Can You Drink Alcohol With Concussion?

Can You Drink Alcohol With Concussion
Drinking with a Concussion: What’s the Problem? – “As a concussion specialist who has worked with thousands of TBI patients, I cannot stress this enough: do not drink alcohol while recovering from a brain injury,” says medical director and founder of Mid-Atlantic Concussion (MAC) Alliance. When it comes to this advice, he’s in good company.

According to, alcohol consumption following a brain injury is known to impair brain injury recovery and is not recommended. After sustaining a brain injury, many people find they are much more sensitive to the effects of alcohol – specifically its negative impact on cognition and an increase in symptoms of depression. recommends that concussed individuals not drink alcohol until they have fully recovered, because alcohol may slow down how quickly someone recovers from a TBI, as well as increase the chance of another injury. It can also make it harder to make decisions. (MSKTC), a resource and information clearinghouse for patients and caregivers run by the American Institutes for Research, recommends refraining from alcohol while recovering from a concussion or TBI in order to give the brain the best chance to heal. The MSKTC also notes that people with TBIs can be at risk for seizures, and that drinking may actually increase the risk of having seizures and can trigger seizures. warn that alcohol and other drugs (not approved by your doctor) may slow your recovery and put you at risk of further injury.

How long after concussion can you drink alcohol?

It is sensible to avoid alcohol for at least one week after injury and then monitor carefully how alcohol affects you. Reduce your normal intake until you feel fully recovered.

What happens if you drink alcohol after a concussion?

Understanding the Effects of Alcohol on a Concussed Brain – Is drinking with a concussion bad? The answer: a resounding Yes, for several reasons. Alcohol is known as a central nervous system (CNS) depressant. It slows down nervous activity in the system’s central organ: the brain.

Combining a concussion and alcohol consumption can harm recovery, When alcohol is affecting brain function, it can make it more difficult for the brain to heal. Alcohol can increase the severity of a concussion’s aftereffects, When you drink after a concussion, you may experience more dizziness, headaches and other symptoms. You may be more sensitive to alcohol when recovering from a concussion, While healing from a concussion, alcohol may affect you faster, leading to potentially dangerous levels of intoxication more quickly.

Can alcohol trigger a concussion?

Should You Drink Alcohol After a Concussion ? – Can You Drink Alcohol With Concussion Every brain injury is different. When we use fNCI (a special form of fMRI) to examine patients’ brains, we see some areas of the brain that are hypoactive and some that are hyperactive. The exact combination, along with factors such as balance and blood flow to the liver, determines a person’s symptoms and how they’ll react to alcohol.

  1. If you experience an increase in symptoms while drinking, we recommend against drinking at all.
  2. Animal studies suggest that alcohol impairs recovery from mild TBI; as for human patients, it’s inconclusive.
  3. That said, alcohol can interfere with sleep quality.
  4. Good sleep is essential for full recovery (whether you’re suffering from acute concussion or post-concussion syndrome).

So if you do decide to drink, do it the right way: Don’t drink right before bed, consume it with food, and don’t drink alcohol shortly after traveling to different time zones (the change to your schedule is hard enough to adjust to without adding alcohol to the mix!).

Alcohol is a toxin. We don’t know if brain injury compromises your body’s ability to process alcohol. Both alcohol and concussion affect neurovascular coupling. NVC is important because brain regions need a certain amount of oxygen at the right times to function. Intoxication can alter your balance and decision making, putting you at risk for multiple concussions, Alcohol affects sleep, which affects the recovery process. We recommend avoiding alcohol if it increases your symptoms.

Ultimately, whether or not to drink alcohol during concussion recovery or while suffering from post-concussion syndrome is up to you and your doctor. But you may set back your recovery in the process. Note: Heavy use of alcohol is common after a TBI, We do not intend to discuss substance abuse in this post. If you need help, try the samhsa.gov helpline,

Can you have caffeine and alcohol on a concussion?

‘The bottom line: Limit your caffeine to your normal pre-concussion routine, unless it’s excessive, and don’t drink it late in the day. Alcohol is off limits until your concussion expert okays you to do so,’ advises Dr. Sufrinko.

Can I drink one beer after a concussion?

Can You Drink Alcohol with A Concussion? – Drinking alcohol with a concussion can be damaging to the brain’s recovery. It may prolong symptoms or in some cases, even make them worse. Because alcohol is a psychoactive substance, it alters brain function.

A concussed brain can be especially sensitive to these changes, which can make the effects of alcohol more pronounced. Even just one drink with a concussion could lead to intoxicating effects that make concussion symptoms worse. Alcohol is also a neurotoxin that can kill brain cells and make recovery more challenging when the brain is trying to heal.

Your best bet is to avoid drinking after a concussion altogether. Along with hindering recovery, having alcohol after a concussion could potentially lead to further injury. A concussion already can lead to confusion, impaired coordination, or cause dizziness.

When combined with alcohol that has similar effects, the results may be stronger symptoms that can lead to injury from a fall or accident. If someone with a concussion experiences another brain injury, it could lead to permanent brain damage. Unfortunately, not everyone is willing or able to give up drinking alcohol with a concussion.

If you find yourself or a loved one unable to stop drinking after a concussion, they may have an alcohol problem and need inpatient or outpatient addiction treatment to get better. Drinking with a concussion isn’t the only thing you should avoid. Psychoactive substances and sometimes neurotoxins as well as illicit drugs like cocaine and methamphetamine can cause damaging effects to the brain on their own.

Like with alcohol, taking these illicit drugs when you have a concussion can hinder the recovery process or make concussion symptoms worse. It is best to avoid taking any unnecessary drugs when you have a concussion and get any medications you do take cleared by your doctor. If you find yourself drinking or using drugs regardless of a concussion or other brain injury, you may need help.

Our drug rehab in Chicago helps people move past their drug and alcohol problems. By quitting, you may even avoid further injury as anywhere from 30 to 50% of people with a traumatic brain injury got hurt while they were under the influence of alcohol and about 33% were under the influence of drugs.3

What should I avoid after a concussion?

Electronic Devices and Screen Time During Concussion Recovery – It is important not to completely avoid use of electronic devices or exposure to screens unnecessarily. Restriction from email and social media can lead to social isolation and worsening of concussion-like symptoms.

Does alcohol make post concussion syndrome worse?

Neurovascular coupling decreases even more – As you discovered earlier in this article, your neurovascular coupling has probably slowed down since your brain injury. This means that the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal doesn’t come through that well anymore, which causes your brain to have too little blood flow and oxygen in certain regions at certain times.

How long does a mild concussion last?

Getting Better After a Mild TBI or Concussion There are steps you can take to feel better after a mild TBI or concussion. If you do not think you are getting better or your symptoms are getting worse, tell your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider may refer you to a specialist.

Older adults Young children Teens People who have had a concussion or other TBI in the past

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The first few days

Take it easy the first few days after a mild TBI or concussion when symptoms are more severe. You may need to take a short time off from work or school, although usually no more than 2 to 3 days. Ask your healthcare for written instructions about when you can safely return to work, school, or other activities, such as driving a car.

As you start to feel better

As you start to feel better after the first few days of your injury, you can gradually return to regular (non-strenuous) activities, such as taking a short walk. Avoid activities that make your symptoms come back or get worse.

When symptoms are nearly gone

When your symptoms are mild and nearly gone, you can return to most of your regular activities. If your symptoms do not get worse during an activity, then that activity is OK for you. If your symptoms get worse, you should cut back on that activity.

Taking these steps may help speed your recovery:

Avoid activities that can put you at risk for another injury to your head and brain. Stay connected to friends and loved ones and talk with them about how you are feeling. Having support from family and friends can help with your recovery. Ask your healthcare provider about medications that are safe to take during recovery to help with symptoms (for example, ibuprofen or acetaminophen for headaches). Limit screen time and loud music before bed, sleep in a dark room, and keep to a fixed bedtime and wake-up schedule.

Talk to your healthcare provider if symptoms don’t go away While most people with a mild TBI or concussion feel better within a couple of weeks, some will have symptoms for months or longer.1 Talk with your healthcare provider if symptoms:

Do not go away, or Get worse after you return to your regular activities

Anxiety and depression may make it harder to adjust to the symptoms of a mild TBI or concussion 2 If you have one or more symptoms that last months after the injury, your healthcare provider may talk to you about post-concussive syndrome. Post-concussive syndrome is believed to occur most commonly among people with:

A history of multiple mild TBI or concussions, or Prior health conditions, such as depression and anxiety 2

Stay connected to others during recovery There are many organizations who can help you and your family as you recover. You do not have to do it alone. Keep talking with your healthcare provider, family members, caregivers, and loved ones about how you are feeling. If you do not think you are getting better, tell your healthcare provider. See webpage for more information on organizations that can provide support for persons living with a TBI and their families. : Getting Better After a Mild TBI or Concussion

How long does a concussion take to heal?

What Steps Should My Child Take to Feel Better? – Making short-term changes to your child’s daily activities can help him or her get back to a regular routine more quickly. As your child begins to feel better, you can slowly remove these changes. Use your child’s symptoms to guide return to normal activities.

  • If your child’s symptoms do not worsen during an activity then this activity is OK for them.
  • If symptoms worsen, your child should cut back on how much he or she can do that activity without experiencing symptoms.
  • It is important to remember that each concussion and each child is unique, so your child’s recovery should be customized based on his or her symptoms.

Factors that might delay recovery include your child having:

a history of a previous concussion or other brain injury, neurological or mental health disorders, learning difficulties, and/or family and social stressors.

Your child should take it easy the first few days after the injury when symptoms are more severe.

Early on, limit physical and thinking/remembering activities to avoid symptoms getting worse. Avoid activities that put your child at risk for another injury to the head and brain. Get a good night’s sleep and take naps during the day as needed.

As your child starts to feel better, gradually return to regular (non-strenuous) activities.

Find relaxing activities at home. Avoid activities that put your child at risk for another injury to the head and brain. Return to school gradually. If symptoms do not worsen during an activity, then this activity is OK for your child. If symptoms worsen, cut back on that activity until it is tolerated. Get maximum nighttime sleep. (Avoid screen time and loud music before bed, sleep in a dark room, and keep to a fixed bedtime and wake up schedule.) Reduce daytime naps or return to a regular daytime nap schedule (as appropriate for their age).

When symptoms are mild and nearly gone, your child can return to most regular activities.

Help your child take breaks only if concussion symptoms worsen. Return to a regular school schedule.

Recovery from a concussion is when your child is able to do all of their regular activities without experiencing any symptoms. Also, be sure to:

Schedule a follow up appointment for your child’s doctor or nurse. Ask your child’s doctor or nurse about safe over-the-counter or prescription medications to help with symptoms (e.g., Ibuprofen or acetaminophen for headache). Limit the number of soft drinks or caffeinated items to help your child rest.

While most children and teens with a concussion feel better within a couple of weeks, some will have symptoms for months or longer. Talk with your children’s or teens’ health care provider if their concussion symptoms do not go away or if they get worse after they return to their regular activities. If your child or teen has concussion symptoms that last weeks to months after the injury, their medical provider may talk to you about post-concussive syndrome. While rare after only one concussion, post-concussive syndrome is believed to occur most commonly in patients with a history of multiple concussions. There are many people who can help you and your family as your child or teen recovers. You do not have to do it alone. Keep talking with your medical provider, family members, and loved ones about how your child or teen is feeling. If you do not think he or she is getting better, tell your medical provider. Concussion Signs and Symptoms Brain Injury Safety and Prevention : Recovery from Concussion

What is the recovery time for a concussion?

Concussion recovery and treatment – Approximately 80 percent of concussions resolve over seven to 14 days, with an average of 10 days. People with concussions should never return to sports or other physical activity sooner than one week from sustaining the injury.

A concussed patient’s recovery has two and sometimes three phases depending on the severity of the concussion: Acute phase is the initial period after sustaining a concussion in which the patient is still experiencing symptoms. This phase can last a week or more. During the acute phase, the concussed brain requires mental and physical rest to recover from the injury.

Absence from school or half-day attendance may be recommended because academic work demands focus, memory, and concentration – all brain processes that are affected by a concussion. Decreasing the amount of activity in the brain through absence from school and schoolwork (and therefore achieving mental rest) will help decrease symptoms and begin the healing process.

  1. People who have had a concussion should avoid texting, computer use, video games, television, driving, loud music and music through headphones because all of these activities make the brain work harder to process information and can exacerbate symptoms and slow the recovery process.
  2. Additionally, people with concussions may not participate in any physical activity until cleared by a health care provider, including gym class, weightlifting and sports activities due to the risk of second impact syndrome.
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This potentially life-threatening event may result from a second, often minor, blow to the head suffered before recovery from the initial injury has occurred. Ultimately, the key to a speedy recovery is both physical and mental rest. The patient may take pain medicine as prescribed, and use an icepack on the head and neck for comfort.

They may also sleep or rest. Recovery phase occurs once the patient feels physical improvement, such as headaches subsiding, and postconcussion neurocognitive test scores have improved. During this phase, the patient can gradually return to academic and athletic activity as directed by a health care provider.

However, academic accommodations may be required during the recovery phase because the concussion may still affect thinking, attention, focus, memory, learning speed and mental processing. Chronic phase occurs in some cases when the patient may experience more long-lasting (chronic) problems with cognitive function.

  1. This may require consideration of a 504 plan, home schooling or a medical leave of absence.
  2. If unmanaged, these problems have the potential to significantly impact the patient’s life as a whole.
  3. Patients who are in the chronic phase of a concussion will be referred to one of our neuro rehab specialists who will treat the chronic symptoms.

No two concussions are exactly the same, so individualized treatment is necessary. Developing brains are highly variable, so the symptoms experienced by one person may be completely different from another. Some patients will take longer to recover from a concussion for various reasons.

Can alcohol cause a brain bleed?

Chronic alcoholics have decreased concentrations of liver-produced coagulation factors and platelet abnormalities that predispose them to hemorrhagic stroke.

What should I drink if I have a concussion?

Water – Water is one of the most important things to consume after a traumatic brain injury. Your brain uses water to digest and absorb all the other nutrients you consume. Drinking plenty of water during your recovery can help your body and brain make the most of the other nutrients you’re taking in. Water can also help regulate your temperature, which is important for post-concussion recovery.

Does a concussion feel like a hangover?

Recovering from concussion can be tricky – ESPN – Chicago Blackhawks Blog- ESPN As the prepare for a huge matchup against the on Saturday, they know they’ll take the ice, once again, without center, The Ducks present a major challenge: a top offensive line which few teams have been able to slow down.

  1. Bolland would be perfect for the job, but he won’t get the chance after getting knocked out of a game on March 9 with a hit to the head that he has yet to recover from.
  2. Bolland hasn’t seen the ice for practice or a game since, and the Hawks don’t have a timetable for his return.
  3. Concussions have been a major topic in sports lately and it’s hard to stand in a team’s locker room and not find several players who have experienced one.

That includes the Hawks. The Blackhawks’ Dave Bolland hasn’t played since suffering a concussion on March 9. Joel Auerbach/Getty Images “I felt like absolute garbage for 4-5 days,” forward said. “When people ask me, ‘what does it feel like?’ I tell them it feels like 24 hours a day, seven days a week, you’re hung over.

  • And it’s the worst hangover you’ve ever had.
  • You feel lethargic, no energy, headaches, and you just want to sleep.” Johnson took a hit in Dallas earlier this season and missed the next three games, although he skated a couple of shifts before leaving.
  • I won’t lie to you, within 25-30 minutes I was very unsure where I was and what I was doing, what day or month it was,” Johnson said.

“Everything becomes panicky.” Defenseman experienced his first major injury while playing for the University of Minnesota last year. Leddy got hit in the open ice, suffering a concussion and a broken jaw. “I don’t recall anything from that night besides warm-ups,” he said.

  1. I don’t remember what happened to me or what I was doing.
  2. I started to remember leaving the rink and heading to the hospital.” Leddy agreed with the “hangover” analogy Johnson used but said he started to feel better within days.
  3. Even so, he had to see a replay of the hit before he knew what happened and he doesn’t recall talking to anyone afterwards, though he did.

“I said some pretty funny stuff,” Leddy said he was told. “I had Bambi legs and I couldn’t really skate. My trainer tells me I told him ‘I can’t believe I got hurt in my first college game.’ And this was already game 8 or 9 so I got knocked back a few weeks.” The unknown timetable for a player’s return is one of the stranger aspects of a concussion.

  • Last season, Johnson was taken off on a stretcher after tripping over ‘s stick and falling headfirst into the boards while playing for Vancouver.
  • The next day, his teammates couldn’t believe their eyes when he walked into the dressing room.
  • You just never know,” Johnson said.
  • Every concussion is different.

I could have played that very next night. I missed a few days and that was it.” Bolland, who understandably isn’t doing interviews, feels bad today but he could be better tomorrow. But his recovery hasn’t happened yet and Johnson says you have to be careful of “mind games.” “You think you might not be feeling well for some other reason and really, it’s the concussion still,” he said.

“So you have to be careful.” Bolland’s teammates are doing their best to be there for him. “The worst thing you can do to a guy battling with a concussion is to run into him every day and be like, ‘How you feeling, how you feeling,’ ” Johnson said. “I tend not to ask about it and instead just say, ‘Hey, how’s your day going.’ That kind of thing.” Right now Bolland’s days aren’t going well but that could change as quickly as he got hit.

That’s the hope, anyway. : Recovering from concussion can be tricky – ESPN – Chicago Blackhawks Blog- ESPN

Can you workout with a concussion?

After a sports-related concussion, traditional recovery recommendations have previously called for weeks or months of rest, depending on the duration of a person’s symptoms. But Michael Popovich, M.D., M.P.H., a sports neurologist at Michigan NeuroSport, thinks this method could actually do more harm than good.

  1. LISTEN UP: Add the new Michigan Medicine News Break to your Alexa-enabled device, or subscribe to our daily updates on iTunes, Google Play and Stitcher,
  2. Recent studies have suggested that regular, daily activities during the initial days of a concussion may actually be safe, not worsen symptoms and even speed up recovery.

The research also suggests supervised exercise challenges and mild to moderate levels of physical exertion during that same period could provide similar effects. Even athletes with symptoms that lasted longer than four weeks benefited from active rehabilitation.

What makes a concussion worse?

Ignoring your symptoms and trying to ‘tough it out’ often makes symptoms worse. Rest is very important after a concussion because it helps the brain to heal. You’ll need to be patient because healing takes time.

What makes post concussion worse?

Not sleeping well can worsen symptoms resulting from concussion including cognition (thinking), mood changes, anxiety, fatigue and irritability. Nightmares can also sometimes be problematic following a concussion. Feelings of anxiety and sadness can also contribute to poor sleep.

Does alcohol make post concussion syndrome worse?

Neurovascular coupling decreases even more – As you discovered earlier in this article, your neurovascular coupling has probably slowed down since your brain injury. This means that the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal doesn’t come through that well anymore, which causes your brain to have too little blood flow and oxygen in certain regions at certain times.

How long does it take to fully recover from a concussion?

Concussion recovery and treatment – Approximately 80 percent of concussions resolve over seven to 14 days, with an average of 10 days. People with concussions should never return to sports or other physical activity sooner than one week from sustaining the injury.

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A concussed patient’s recovery has two and sometimes three phases depending on the severity of the concussion: Acute phase is the initial period after sustaining a concussion in which the patient is still experiencing symptoms. This phase can last a week or more. During the acute phase, the concussed brain requires mental and physical rest to recover from the injury.

Absence from school or half-day attendance may be recommended because academic work demands focus, memory, and concentration – all brain processes that are affected by a concussion. Decreasing the amount of activity in the brain through absence from school and schoolwork (and therefore achieving mental rest) will help decrease symptoms and begin the healing process.

People who have had a concussion should avoid texting, computer use, video games, television, driving, loud music and music through headphones because all of these activities make the brain work harder to process information and can exacerbate symptoms and slow the recovery process. Additionally, people with concussions may not participate in any physical activity until cleared by a health care provider, including gym class, weightlifting and sports activities due to the risk of second impact syndrome.

This potentially life-threatening event may result from a second, often minor, blow to the head suffered before recovery from the initial injury has occurred. Ultimately, the key to a speedy recovery is both physical and mental rest. The patient may take pain medicine as prescribed, and use an icepack on the head and neck for comfort.

They may also sleep or rest. Recovery phase occurs once the patient feels physical improvement, such as headaches subsiding, and postconcussion neurocognitive test scores have improved. During this phase, the patient can gradually return to academic and athletic activity as directed by a health care provider.

However, academic accommodations may be required during the recovery phase because the concussion may still affect thinking, attention, focus, memory, learning speed and mental processing. Chronic phase occurs in some cases when the patient may experience more long-lasting (chronic) problems with cognitive function.

  • This may require consideration of a 504 plan, home schooling or a medical leave of absence.
  • If unmanaged, these problems have the potential to significantly impact the patient’s life as a whole.
  • Patients who are in the chronic phase of a concussion will be referred to one of our neuro rehab specialists who will treat the chronic symptoms.

No two concussions are exactly the same, so individualized treatment is necessary. Developing brains are highly variable, so the symptoms experienced by one person may be completely different from another. Some patients will take longer to recover from a concussion for various reasons.

How long does a concussion take to heal?

What Steps Should My Child Take to Feel Better? – Making short-term changes to your child’s daily activities can help him or her get back to a regular routine more quickly. As your child begins to feel better, you can slowly remove these changes. Use your child’s symptoms to guide return to normal activities.

If your child’s symptoms do not worsen during an activity then this activity is OK for them. If symptoms worsen, your child should cut back on how much he or she can do that activity without experiencing symptoms. It is important to remember that each concussion and each child is unique, so your child’s recovery should be customized based on his or her symptoms.

Factors that might delay recovery include your child having:

a history of a previous concussion or other brain injury, neurological or mental health disorders, learning difficulties, and/or family and social stressors.

Your child should take it easy the first few days after the injury when symptoms are more severe.

Early on, limit physical and thinking/remembering activities to avoid symptoms getting worse. Avoid activities that put your child at risk for another injury to the head and brain. Get a good night’s sleep and take naps during the day as needed.

As your child starts to feel better, gradually return to regular (non-strenuous) activities.

Find relaxing activities at home. Avoid activities that put your child at risk for another injury to the head and brain. Return to school gradually. If symptoms do not worsen during an activity, then this activity is OK for your child. If symptoms worsen, cut back on that activity until it is tolerated. Get maximum nighttime sleep. (Avoid screen time and loud music before bed, sleep in a dark room, and keep to a fixed bedtime and wake up schedule.) Reduce daytime naps or return to a regular daytime nap schedule (as appropriate for their age).

When symptoms are mild and nearly gone, your child can return to most regular activities.

Help your child take breaks only if concussion symptoms worsen. Return to a regular school schedule.

Recovery from a concussion is when your child is able to do all of their regular activities without experiencing any symptoms. Also, be sure to:

Schedule a follow up appointment for your child’s doctor or nurse. Ask your child’s doctor or nurse about safe over-the-counter or prescription medications to help with symptoms (e.g., Ibuprofen or acetaminophen for headache). Limit the number of soft drinks or caffeinated items to help your child rest.

While most children and teens with a concussion feel better within a couple of weeks, some will have symptoms for months or longer. Talk with your children’s or teens’ health care provider if their concussion symptoms do not go away or if they get worse after they return to their regular activities. If your child or teen has concussion symptoms that last weeks to months after the injury, their medical provider may talk to you about post-concussive syndrome. While rare after only one concussion, post-concussive syndrome is believed to occur most commonly in patients with a history of multiple concussions. There are many people who can help you and your family as your child or teen recovers. You do not have to do it alone. Keep talking with your medical provider, family members, and loved ones about how your child or teen is feeling. If you do not think he or she is getting better, tell your medical provider. Concussion Signs and Symptoms Brain Injury Safety and Prevention : Recovery from Concussion

How long after a head injury are you in the clear?

Recovering from concussion – If you’re diagnosed with concussion in hospital, you’ll be able to go home when any serious brain injury has been ruled out and you’re starting to feel better. Most people feel back to normal within a few days or weeks of going home. But some people, especially children, can take longer to recover. Things you can do to help your recovery include:

getting plenty of rest and avoiding stressful situations asking someone to stay with you for the first 48 hours so they can look out for problems such as changes in your behaviour or problems concentrating or understanding taking paracetamol if you have a headache – don’t use aspirin or anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen because they could cause your injury to bleed avoiding alcohol when you’re feeling better, gradually increasing how much activity you do each day – do as much as you can without your symptoms coming back don’t return to things like work, college, school, driving or riding a bike until you feel you’ve recovered avoiding sports or strenuous exercise for at least a week, and avoiding contact sports for at least three weeks

Speak to your GP if you still have symptoms after two weeks or you’re unsure about returning to activities such as work or sports. Get medical help straight away if you develop any symptoms that mean you should go to hospital or call 999.

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