How Many Drinks A Week Makes You An Alcoholic?

How Many Drinks A Week Makes You An Alcoholic
Drinking in Moderation: According to the “Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture, adults of legal drinking age can choose not to drink or to drink in moderation by limiting intake to 2 drinks or less in a day for men and 1 drink or less in a day for women, when alcohol is consumed.

NIAAA defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking alcohol that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 percent – or 0.08 grams of alcohol per deciliter – or higher. For a typical adult, this pattern corresponds to consuming 5 or more drinks (male), or 4 or more drinks (female), in about 2 hours.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which conducts the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), defines binge drinking as 5 or more alcoholic drinks for males or 4 or more alcoholic drinks for females on the same occasion (i.e., at the same time or within a couple of hours of each other) on at least 1 day in the past month.

Heavy Alcohol Use:

NIAAA defines heavy drinking as follows:

For men, consuming more than 4 drinks on any day or more than 14 drinks per week For women, consuming more than 3 drinks on any day or more than 7 drinks per week

SAMHSA defines heavy alcohol use as binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month.

Patterns of Drinking Associated with Alcohol Use Disorder : Binge drinking and heavy alcohol use can increase an individual’s risk of alcohol use disorder. Certain people should avoid alcohol completely, including those who:

Plan to drive or operate machinery, or participate in activities that require skill, coordination, and alertness Take certain over-the-counter or prescription medications Have certain medical conditions Are recovering from alcohol use disorder or are unable to control the amount that they drink Are younger than age 21 Are pregnant or may become pregnant

How much do you have to drink to be an alcoholic?

What is Excessive Alcohol Use? How Many Drinks A Week Makes You An Alcoholic What is excessive alcohol use? Excessive drinking includes:

Binge drinking: For women, binge drinking is 4 or more drinks consumed on one occasion (one occasion = 2-3 hours). For men, binge drinking is 5 or more drinks consumed on one occasion. Underage drinking: Any alcohol use by those under age 21. Heavy drinking: For women, heavy drinking is 8 drinks or more per week. For men, heavy drinking is 15 drinks or more per week. Pregnant drinking: Any alcohol use by pregnant women

What is considered a “drink”? U.S. standard drink sizes:

12 ounces of 5% ABV beer 8 ounces of 7% ABV malt liquor 5 ounces of 12% ABV wine 1.5 ounces of 40% ABV (80-proof) distilled spirits or liquor (examples: gin, rum, vodka, whiskey)

How does excessive drinking affect us?

88,000 deaths per year Violence, injuries, and motor vehicle crashes Risky sexual behaviors, unintended pregnancies, miscarriage and stillbirth Chronic conditions such as cancer, heart disease and high blood pressure $249 billion economic cost

Binge drinking is the main problem

Over 90% of excessive drinkers binge drink 1 in 6 more than 38 million U.S. adults binge drink Binge drinkers do so about 4 times a month Binge drinkers average 8 drinks per binge Most people who binge drink are not alcohol dependent or alcoholics

If you choose to drink, do so in moderation

No one should begin drinking or drink more frequently based on potential health benefits Up to 1 drink a day for women Up to 2 drinks a day for men Don’t drink at all if you are under age 21, pregnant or may be pregnant, or have health problems that could be made worse by drinking

For more information: : What is Excessive Alcohol Use?

How many drinks a week is safe?

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Is daily drinking problem drinking? How Many Drinks A Week Makes You An Alcoholic DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Is it possible to become an alcoholic just by having one or two drinks nightly? I have a glass or two of wine with dinner but never drink to the point of feeling drunk. Should I be concerned? ANSWER: Occasional beer or wine with dinner, or a drink in the evening, is not a health problem for most people.

When drinking becomes a daily activity, though, it may represent progression of your consumption and place you at increased health risks. From your description of your drinking habits, it may be time to take a closer look at how much you drink. Drinking alcohol in moderation generally is not a cause for concern.

According to the, drinking is considered to be in the moderate or low-risk range for women at no more than three drinks in any one day and no more than seven drinks per week. For men, it is no more than four drinks a day and no more than 14 drinks per week. How Many Drinks A Week Makes You An Alcoholic That said, it’s easy to drink more than a standard drink in one glass. For example, many wine glasses hold far more than 5 ounces. You could easily drink 8 ounces of wine in a glass. If you have two of those glasses during a meal, you are consuming about three standard drinks.

Although not drinking to the point of becoming drunk is a common way people gauge how much they should drink, it can be inaccurate. Researchers who study find that people with high tolerance to alcohol, who do not feel the effects of alcohol after they drink several alcoholic beverages, are actually at a higher risk for alcohol-related problems.

It’s also important to note that, even though you may not feel the effects of alcohol, you still have the same amount of alcohol in your body as someone who starts to feel intoxicated after one or two drinks. Your lack of response to the alcohol may be related to an increase in your body’s alcohol tolerance over time.

Some people are born with high tolerance; many people develop a tolerance with regular drinking. Drinking more than the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism recommended limits puts you in the category of “at-risk” drinking. That means you have a higher risk for negative consequences related to your alcohol use, including health and social problems.

You are also at higher risk of becoming addicted to alcohol. Alcohol can damage your body’s organs and lead to various health concerns. For women, this damage happens with lower doses of alcohol, because their bodies have lower water content than men. That’s why the moderate drinking guidelines for women and men are so different.

The specific organ damage that happens with too much alcohol use varies considerably from one person to another. The most common health effects include heart, liver and nerve damage, as well as memory problems and sexual dysfunction. Unless you notice specific negative consequences related to your drinking, it probably is not necessary for you to quit drinking alcohol entirely.

However, I would strongly encourage you to reduce the amount you drink, so it fits within the guidelines of moderate drinking. Doing so can protect your health in the long run. —, Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota : Mayo Clinic Q and A: Is daily drinking problem drinking?

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Is 14 drinks a week too much?

Men and women are advised not to drink more than 14 units a week on a regular basis. spread your drinking over 3 or more days if you regularly drink as much as 14 units a week. if you want to cut down, try to have several drink-free days each week.

What qualifies as an alcoholic?

Press Release – Embargoed until: Thursday, November 20, 2014, Noon ET Contact: pdf icon 9 out of 10 excessive drinkers are not alcohol dependent 89.8%: Excessive Drinkers Who are Not Dependent 10.2%: Excessive Drinkers Who are Dependent Entire Infographic pdf icon Nine in 10 adults who drink too much alcohol are not alcoholics or alcohol dependent, according to a new study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

  • The study appears today in the CDC journal Preventing Chronic Disease,
  • Excessive drinking includes binge drinking (four or more drinks on an occasion for women, five or more drinks on an occasion for men); consuming eight or more drinks a week for women or 15 or more drinks a week for men; or any alcohol use by pregnant women or those under the minimum legal drinking age of 21.

Alcohol dependence is a chronic medical condition that typically includes a current or past history of excessive drinking, a strong craving for alcohol, continued use despite repeated problems with drinking, and an inability to control alcohol consumption.

“This study shows that, contrary to popular opinion, most people who drink too much are not alcohol dependent or alcoholics,” said Robert Brewer, M.D., M.S.P.H., Alcohol Program Lead at CDC and one of the report’s authors. “It also emphasizes the importance of taking a comprehensive approach to reducing excessive drinking that includes evidence-based community strategies, screening and counseling in healthcare settings, and high-quality substance abuse treatment for those who need it.” The study found that nearly 1 in 3 adults is an excessive drinker, and most of them binge drink, usually on multiple occasions.

In contrast, about 1 in 30 adults is classified as alcohol dependent. The rates of alcohol dependence increase with the amount of alcohol consumed. About 10 percent of binge drinkers are alcohol dependent, while 30 percent of people who binge frequently (10 or more times a month) are alcohol dependent.

  1. Excessive alcohol use is responsible for 88,000 deaths in the U.S.
  2. Each year (including about 3,700 deaths from alcohol dependence), and cost the U.S.
  3. 223.5 billion in 2006.
  4. These deaths were due to health effects from drinking too much over time, such as breast cancer, liver disease, and heart disease; and health effects from drinking too much in a short period of time, such as violence, alcohol poisoning, and motor vehicle crashes.

Excessive drinkers who are dependent often need specialized or more intensive treatment to change their behavior. People who drink too much, but are not dependent, can still be encouraged to drink less through state and local interventions that increase the price and limit the availability of alcohol.

  • In addition those who are not dependent may be candidates for other clinical interventions, including screening and counseling offered by doctors and other health professionals.
  • CDC and SAMHSA scientists analyzed data on 138,100 U.S.
  • Adults aged 18 years and older from all 50 states and D.C.
  • Who participated in the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) in 2009, 2010, or 2011.

The survey includes a wide range of questions on substance use, including current drinking, binge drinking, average alcohol consumption, and symptoms of alcohol dependence. The Community Preventive Services Task Force recommends several evidence-based strategies to reduce excessive drinking, including increasing alcohol taxes, regulating alcohol outlet density, and holding alcohol retailers liable for harms resulting from illegal sales to minors or intoxicated patrons.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening and counseling for excessive drinking for all adult patients. This service is covered by most insurance plans, and can also be delivered by computer or telephone. For more information about excessive drinking, including binge drinking, and how to prevent this dangerous behavior, visit the CDC’s Alcohol and Public Health website at http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/index.htm.

Members of the public who are concerned about their own or someone else’s drinking can call SAMHSA’s National Helpline at1-800-662-HELP to receive assistance from the Treatment Referral Routing Service. ### U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES external icon

Is 4 alcoholic drinks a week too much?

The Basics: Defining How Much Alcohol is Too Much Step 1 – Read the Article

  • Show your patients a standard drink chart when asking about their alcohol consumption to encourage more accurate estimates. Drinks often contain more alcohol than people think, and patients often underestimate their consumption.
  • Advise some patients not to drink at all, including those who are managing health conditions that can be worsened by alcohol, are taking medications that could interact with alcohol, are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or are under age 21.
  • Otherwise, advise patients who choose to drink to follow the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, by limiting intake to 1 drink or less for women and 2 drinks or less for men—on any single day, not on average, Drinking at this level may reduce, though not eliminate, risks.
  • Don’t advise non-drinking patients to start drinking alcohol for their health. Past research overestimated benefits of moderate drinking, while current research points to added risks, such as for breast cancer, even with low levels of drinking.

How much, how fast, and how often a person drinks alcohol all factor into the risk for alcohol-related problems. How much and how fast a person drinks influences how much alcohol enters the bloodstream, how impaired he or she becomes, and what the related acute risks will be.

Over time, how much and how often a person drinks influences not only acute risks but also chronic health problems, including liver disease and alcohol use disorder (AUD), and social harms such as relationship problems.1 (See Core articles on and,) It can be hard for patients to gauge and accurately report their alcohol intake to clinicians, in part because labels on alcohol containers typically list only the percent of alcohol by volume (ABV) and not serving sizes or the number of servings per container.

Whether served in a bar or restaurant or poured at home, drinks often contain more alcohol than people think. It’s easy and common for patients to underestimate their consumption.2,3 While there is no guaranteed safe amount of alcohol for anyone, general guidelines can help clinicians advise their patients and minimize the risks.

  1. Here, we will provide basic information about drink sizes, drinking patterns, and alcohol metabolism to help answer the question “how much is too much?” In short, the answer from current research is, the less alcohol, the better.
  2. A note on drinking level terms used in this Core article: The 2020-2025 states that for adults who choose to drink alcohol, women should have 1 drink or less in a day and men should have 2 drinks or less in a day.
See also:  Can Alcohol Make You Depressed?

These amounts are not intended as an average but rather a daily limit. brings a person’s blood alcohol concentration to 0.08 percent or more, which typically happens if a woman has 4 or more drinks, or a man has 5 or more drinks, within about 2 hours.

How often is it OK to drink?

Dietary Guidelines for Alcohol

  • Alcohol consumption is associated with a variety of short- and long-term health risks, including motor vehicle crashes, violence, sexual risk behaviors, high blood pressure, and various cancers (e.g., breast cancer).1
  • The risk of these harms increases with the amount of alcohol you drink. For some conditions, like some cancers, the risk increases even at very low levels of alcohol consumption (less than 1 drink).2,3
  • To reduce the risk of alcohol-related harms, the recommends that adults of legal drinking age can choose not to drink, or to drink in moderation by limiting intake to 2 drinks or less in a day for men or 1 drink or less in a day for women, on days when alcohol is consumed.4 The Guidelines also do not recommend that individuals who do not drink alcohol start drinking for any reason and that if adults of legal drinking age choose to drink alcoholic beverages, drinking less is better for health than drinking more.4 How Many Drinks A Week Makes You An Alcoholic
  • Two in three adult drinkers report drinking above moderate levels at least once a month.5

The Guidelines note that some people should not drink alcohol at all, such as:

  • If they are pregnant or might be pregnant.
  • If they are younger than age 21.
  • If they have certain medical conditions or are taking certain medications that can interact with alcohol.
  • If they are recovering from an alcohol use disorder or if they are unable to control the amount they drink.4

The Guidelines also note that not drinking alcohol also is the safest option for women who are lactating. Generally, moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages by a woman who is lactating (up to 1 standard drink in a day) is not known to be harmful to the infant, especially if the woman waits at least 2 hours after a single drink before nursing or expressing breast milk.

  • The Guidelines note, “Emerging evidence suggests that even drinking within the recommended limits may increase the overall risk of death from various causes, such as from several types of cancer and some forms of cardiovascular disease. Alcohol has been found to increase risk for cancer, and for some types of cancer, the risk increases even at low levels of alcohol consumption (less than 1 drink in a day).” 4
  • Although past studies have indicated that moderate alcohol consumption has protective health benefits (e.g., reducing risk of heart disease), recent studies show this may not be true.6-12 While some studies have found improved health outcomes among moderate drinkers, it’s impossible to conclude whether these improved outcomes are due to moderate alcohol consumption or other differences in behaviors or genetics between people who drink moderately and people who don’t.6-12
  • Most U.S. adults who drink don’t drink every day.13 That’s why it’s important to focus on the amount people drink on the days that they drink. Even if women consume an average of 1 drink per day or men consume an average of 2 drinks per day, increases the risk of experiencing alcohol-related harm in the short-term and in the future.14
  • Drinking at levels above the moderate drinking guidelines significantly increases the risk of short-term harms, such as injuries, as well as the risk of long-term chronic health problems, such as some types of cancer.1,15,16
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention., Accessed April 18, 2022.
  2. Di Castelnuovo A, Costanzo S, Bagnardi V, Donati M, Iacoviello L, de Gaetano G., Arch Intern Med 2006;166(22):2437-45.
  3. Rehm J, Shield K. Alcohol consumption. In: Stewart BW, Wild CB, eds., Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2014
  4. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.,9th Edition, Washington, DC; 2020.
  5. Henley SJ, Kanny D, Roland KB, et al., Alcohol Alcohol 2014;49(6):661-7.
  6. Chikritzhs T, Fillmore K, Stockwell T., Drug Alcohol Rev 2009;28:441–4.
  7. Andréasson S, Chikritzhs T, Dangardt F, Holder H, Naimi T, Stockwell T., In: Alcohol and Society 2014, Stockholm: IOGT-NTO & Swedish Society of Medicine, 2014.
  8. Knott CS, Coombs N, Stamatakis E, Biddulph JP., BMJ 2015;350:h384.
  9. Holmes MV, Dale CE, Zuccolo L, et al. BMJ 2014;349:g4164
  10. Naimi TS, Brown DW, Brewer RD, et al., Am J Prev Med 2005;28(4):369–73.
  11. Rosoff DB, Davey Smith G, Mehta N, Clarke TK, Lohoff FW., PLoS Med 2020;17:e1003410.
  12. Biddinger KJ, Emdin CA, Haas ME, et al., JAMA Netw Open 2022;5(3):e223849.
  13. Naimi TS., J Stud Alcohol Drug 2011;72:687.
  14. Holahan CJ, Holahan CK, Moos RH., Am J Prev Med 2022 (in press);10.1016.
  15. Vinson DC, Maclure M, Reidinger C, Smith GS. J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2003;64:358-66.
  16. Nelson DE, Jarman DW, Rehm J, et al. Am J Public Health 2013;103(4):641-8.
  • : Dietary Guidelines for Alcohol

    Why do I drink alcohol every night?

    Drinking every night – a sign of problem drinking or alcoholism? – Here are some of the common signs of alcoholism to think about:

    Experiencing more and more negative consequences as a result of your drinking, such upsetting the family, or feeling increasingly guilty or ashamed Drinking to the point where you ‘black out’ and can’t remember the night before, including conversations or behaviours. You may try to find out what happened by dropping hints, or only remember when someone reminds you Feeling embarrassed about the amount that you drink Needing a drink before you go out in case there isn’t enough. You may have also noticed that other people don’t drink in the same way as you Lying to others or hiding your drinking from others Drinking more than you intended on doing in the evening Finding that you are drinking to relieve stress or to relax Prioritising your drinking above your responsibilities, like family, work and hobbies Wanting to cut down or stop drinking every night but being unable to

    If you feel that you need a drink every night or to get through a social event, stressful situation or personal struggle, and you have a compulsion to drink or, maybe even daily, this could be a sign of psychological dependency. This is just as serious as physical addiction, and is something to address.

    1. Regular heavy drinking can lead to you building up a tolerance to alcohol, where you need to drink more and more to feel its effects.
    2. In an evening, you may feel that you are not getting drunk despite drinking quite a lot of alcohol – this can be a sign that you may have an alcohol problem.
    3. Over time, if you have found that you need to drink to stave off withdrawal symptoms, like shakes, sweating or tremors, this is a sign of physical addiction too.
    See also:  Can Brain Recover From Alcohol Damage?

    It’s important to recognise that it is dangerous to suddenly stop drinking without first consulting your GP.

    How many drinks per day is alcoholism?

    Drinking in Moderation: According to the “Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture, adults of legal drinking age can choose not to drink or to drink in moderation by limiting intake to 2 drinks or less in a day for men and 1 drink or less in a day for women, when alcohol is consumed.

    NIAAA defines binge drinking as a pattern of drinking alcohol that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to 0.08 percent – or 0.08 grams of alcohol per deciliter – or higher. For a typical adult, this pattern corresponds to consuming 5 or more drinks (male), or 4 or more drinks (female), in about 2 hours.

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), which conducts the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), defines binge drinking as 5 or more alcoholic drinks for males or 4 or more alcoholic drinks for females on the same occasion (i.e., at the same time or within a couple of hours of each other) on at least 1 day in the past month.

    Heavy Alcohol Use:

    NIAAA defines heavy drinking as follows:

    For men, consuming more than 4 drinks on any day or more than 14 drinks per week For women, consuming more than 3 drinks on any day or more than 7 drinks per week

    SAMHSA defines heavy alcohol use as binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month.

    Patterns of Drinking Associated with Alcohol Use Disorder : Binge drinking and heavy alcohol use can increase an individual’s risk of alcohol use disorder. Certain people should avoid alcohol completely, including those who:

    Plan to drive or operate machinery, or participate in activities that require skill, coordination, and alertness Take certain over-the-counter or prescription medications Have certain medical conditions Are recovering from alcohol use disorder or are unable to control the amount that they drink Are younger than age 21 Are pregnant or may become pregnant

    How bad is drinking 3 times a week?

    Many people with alcohol problems cannot tell when their drinking is out of control. It is important to be aware of how much you are drinking. You should also know how your alcohol use may affect your life and those around you. One drink equals one 12-ounce (oz), or 355 milliliters (mL), can or bottle of beer, one 5-ounce (148 mL) glass of wine, 1 wine cooler, 1 cocktail, or 1 shot of hard liquor.

    How often you have an alcoholic drinkHow many drinks you have when you do drinkHow any drinking you are doing affects your life or the lives of others

    Here are some guidelines for drinking alcohol responsibly, as long as you do not have a drinking problem. Healthy men up to age 65 should limit themselves to:

    No more than 4 drinks in 1 dayNo more than 14 drinks in a week

    Healthy women up to age 65 should limit themselves to:

    No more than 3 drinks in 1 dayNo more than 7 drinks in a week

    Healthy women of all ages and healthy men over age 65 should limit themselves to:

    No more than 3 drinks in 1 dayNo more than 7 drinks in a week

    Health care providers consider your drinking medically unsafe when you drink:

    Many times a month, or even many times a week3 to 4 drinks (or more) in 1 day5 or more drinks on one occasion monthly, or even weekly

    You may have a drinking problem if you have at least 2 of the following characteristics:

    There are times when you drink more or longer than you planned to.You have not been able to cut down or stop drinking on your own, even though you have tried or you want to.You spend a lot of time drinking, being sick from drinking, or getting over the effects of drinking.Your urge to drink is so strong, you cannot think about anything else.As a result of drinking, you do not do what you are expected to do at home, work, or school. Or, you keep getting sick because of drinking.You continue to drink, even though alcohol is causing problems with your family or friends.You spend less time on or no longer take part in activities that used to be important or that you enjoyed. Instead, you use that time to drink.Your drinking has led to situations that you or someone else could have been injured, such as driving while drunk or having unsafe sex.Your drinking makes you anxious, depressed, forgetful, or causes other health problems, but you keep drinking.You need to drink more than you did to get the same effect from alcohol. Or, the number of drinks you are used to having now have less effect than before.When the effects of alcohol wear off, you have symptoms of withdrawal. These include, tremors, sweating, nausea, or insomnia. You may even have had a seizure or hallucinations (sensing things that are not there).

    If you or others are concerned, make an appointment with your provider to talk about your drinking. Your provider can help guide you to the best treatment, More information and support for people with drinking problems and their families can be found at:

    Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) – aa.org/

    Alcohol use disorder – drinking problem; Alcohol abuse – drinking problem; Alcoholism – drinking problem; Alcohol dependence – drinking problem; Alcohol addiction – drinking problem Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Fact sheets: alcohol use and your health.

    Www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm, Updated April 14, 2022. Accessed May 9, 2022. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website. Alcohol’s effects on the body. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohols-effects-health/alcohols-effects-body, Accessed May 6, 2022. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism website.

    Understanding alcohol use disorder. www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/brochures-and-fact-sheets/understanding-alcohol-use-disorder, Updated April 2021. Accessed May 6, 2022. O’Connor PG. Alcohol use disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine,26th ed.

    Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 30. Sherin K, Seikel S, Hale S. Alcohol use disorders. In: Rakel RE, Rakel DP, eds. Textbook of Family Medicine,9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 48. US Preventive Services Task Force. Screening and behavioral counseling interventions to reduce unhealthy alcohol use in adolescents and adults: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement.

    JAMA,2018;320(18):1899-1909. PMID: 30422199 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30422199/, Updated by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M.

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