How To Fall Asleep After Drinking Alcohol?

How To Fall Asleep After Drinking Alcohol
How to sleep after drinking

  1. Give your body time to process the alcohol. It’s hard to say exactly how long it takes your body to metabolize alcohol, but the general rule of thumb is 1 hour for a standard drink.
  2. Go to the bathroom before bed.
  3. Stay away from fizzy drinks.
  4. Skip drinks with caffeine.

What helps sleep after drinking alcohol?

What Alcohol Affects, Water Offsets – We’ve all been told that drinking eight glasses of water a day keeps us healthy and ready for the day, but have you ever tried drinking water after every pint or shot? One of the effects of alcohol is obviously, getting you drunk.

  1. Intoxication, mild or severe, leads to dehydration and this adds to the headaches and vomiting.
  2. It has been proven that drinking water in between rounds minimises alcohol effects in the short term, and allows you to function at a kind of normal capacity.
  3. Drinking plenty of water can combat the diuretic effect of alcohol on your body.

Another benefit of drinking water while drinking alcohol lessens the effects of alcohol when it comes to your sleep. A bad hangover prevents you from getting enough sleep and in bad cases, will have you throwing up in the middle of the night. Drinking plenty of water might help prevent those sleep disruptions.

Why can’t I sleep after drinking alcohol?

Why Does Alcohol Mess With My Sleep? (Published 2022) How To Fall Asleep After Drinking Alcohol Credit. Aileen Son for The New York Times Ask Well Tips for getting a better night’s rest when your evening plans include drinking. Credit. Aileen Son for The New York Times

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Published Jan.25, 2022 Updated May 5, 2022

To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times,, A couple of glasses of wine or a few drinks in the evening will probably make you fall asleep faster than normal. Who among us hasn’t left the dishes for the next morning or neglected a skin-care routine after a dinner party or festive night out? But even if you thud into dreamland, there’s a good chance that too much alcohol will mean a fitful night of sleep.

  • That’s because alcohol, the normal phases of deeper and lighter sleep we go through every night.
  • A night of drinking can “fragment,” or interrupt, these patterns, experts say, and you may wake up several times as you ricochet through the usual stages of,
  • You pay for it in the second half of the night,” said Dr.

Jennifer Martin, a psychologist and professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. Alcohol is “initially sedating, but as it’s metabolized, it’s very activating.” Here’s how it breaks down. In the first half of the night, when fairly high levels of alcohol are still coursing through your bloodstream, you’ll probably sleep deeply and dreamlessly.

One reason: In the brain, alcohol acts on gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, a neurotransmitter that inhibits impulses between nerve cells and has a calming effect. Alcohol can also suppress rapid eye movement, or REM sleep, which is when most dreaming occurs. Later in the night, as alcohol levels drop, your brain kicks into overdrive.

You may toss and turn as your body undergoes a rebound arousal. “As the levels decline, you’re going to get more issues with the fragmentation,” said Dr.R. Nisha Aurora, a member of the board of directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. You’ll also probably have more vivid or stressful dreams and — because fitful sleep means that you’re waking up more regularly — you are more likely to remember them.

Alcohol is also a diuretic, a substance that increases urine output, which means you may find yourself waking up to go to the bathroom. “You are going to have to pee more often,” said Dr. Bhanu Prakash Kolla, an associate professor of psychiatry and a consultant at the Center for Sleep Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“Moderate amounts of alcohol, especially wine and spirits, have an early diuretic effect, especially in the elderly,” he added. It’s unclear whether the urge to urinate wakes you up, or if you’re just more attuned to your body in the second half of the night because you’re sleeping more fitfully.

People may also snore more after they drink. Alcohol is a muscle relaxant and relaxes the muscles in your upper airways, disrupting normal breathing. Drinking can be especially dangerous for people with obstructive, who wake up many times during the night as their airways momentarily collapse. Most experts agree that drinking will mess with your sleep, no matter your age or gender.

And because alcohol depresses the central nervous system, experts caution against using it with sleep aids such as Ambien, Tylenol PM, Benadryl or even supplements like melatonin. “Alcohol is a sedative,” said Dr. Ilene M. Rosen, a sleep medicine doctor and associate professor of medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

  1. I would not use any sedative hypnotic, whether over-the-counter or not, when you’re drinking alcohol.” Some people drink closer to bedtime to help them get to sleep.
  2. But that can start a dangerous cycle of more fragmented sleep, followed by heavier drinking.
  3. I do see a lot of people who self-medicate for insomnia with alcohol, which is definitely not a good practice,” said Dr.

Sabra Abbott, an assistant professor of neurology in sleep medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Sustained nightly drinking can establish worrying patterns that can persist even after people have stopped drinking, she and other experts say.

To help assess how alcohol may be affecting your sleep, experts recommend an alcohol-free reset period, or what Dr. Martin called “an alcohol holiday,” lasting at least two weeks. “It can be very eye-opening to appreciate how much alcohol affects your sleep,” she said. A lot of people who think they have insomnia, she said, may just be drinking too much or too close to bedtime.

“It turns out that if they don’t drink, they sleep much better,” said Dr. Martin, who is also a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. After the “holiday,” she said, “they can just make a more informed decision about how much — and how often — they consume alcohol.” Experts also suggest building in a buffer zone of at least a few hours between drinking and bedtime.

A nightcap is not your friend. “It’s probably OK to have a glass of wine with dinner four hours before bed,” Dr. Abbott said. Or maybe limit your drinking to happy hour or the appetizer course. Alcohol can mess with your morning routine, too. “People may turn to stimulants” like caffeine, drinking coffee well into the afternoon, said Dr.

Armeen Poor, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Metropolitan Hospital Center in New York and clinical assistant professor of medicine at New York Medical College. “That makes it harder to fall asleep at night,” he said. “And then you need more of that sedative, and then it just goes around and around and around.” Audio produced by Kate Winslett.

How long does it take to fall asleep after drinking?

Frequently Asked Questions –

  • Why does alcohol make you sleepy? Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, also called a sedative. Sedatives cause your brain activity to slow down and can make you feel relaxed. This may allow you to fall asleep more quickly, however it can greatly impact your sleep quality.
  • How does alcohol disrupt your sleep? Alcohol may reduce REM sleep in the first half of the night, creating an imbalance in your sleep cycle. This can decrease your sleep quality and may lead to less sleep and more awakenings.
See also:  Welke Alcohol Heeft De Minste CalorieëN?

Verywell Health uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Sleep Health Foundation. Caffeine, food, alcohol, smoking, and sleep.
  2. Simou E, Britton J, Leonardi-Bee J. Alcohol and the risk of sleep apnoea: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Sleep Med,2018;42:38–46. doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2017.12.005
  3. Cederbaum AI. Alcohol metabolism, Clin Liver Dis,2012;16(4):667–685. doi:10.1016/j.cld.2012.08.002
  4. Sleep Foundation. Alcohol and sleep,

By Brandon Peters, MD Brandon Peters, MD, is a board-certified neurologist and sleep medicine specialist. Thanks for your feedback!

How do you sleep with hangover anxiety?

Do you get ‘hangxiety’? How to cope with an anxious hangover Y ou’ve got a raging thirst but you can’t drag yourself out of bed for a glass of water. All you remember from last night is going off on one about a man who “hatfished” you on a date while wearing a cap, only to realise the guy listening to you was heavily receding.

None of your friends have messaged you this morning so you assume they must hate you now. You lie in the foetal position and kid yourself into believing you are still asleep so you don’t have to deal with the consequences of your actions. You have “hangxiety” (hangover anxiety) or you are suffering from a “prangover” (pranging out hungover), and it’s the worst feeling in the world.

There’s a scientific reason why drinking makes us feel like this. “Alcohol is one of the most promiscuous of drugs, in that it affects a lot of different types of receptors and hence the majority, if not all, of the neurons,” says David Nutt, professor of neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London and author of 2020 book Drink? The New Science of Alcohol and Your Health.

That blissed-out state we associate with drinking is caused by alcohol enhancing the Gaba receptors (neurotransmitters that essentially turn off the brain) and this calms you down by making fewer neurons fire. As we enter withdrawal, the brain increases levels of the main excitatory transmitter, glutamate, in an attempt to decrease Gaba, and this chemical imbalance results in anxiety.

Or, in other words – as Nutt puts it: “The brain is a finely balanced machine. You add in alcohol and that balance dissolves like a sugar cube in hot tea.” Not remembering leaves you feeling you lost control. It’s horrible Rachel Buchan, psychotherapist To make matters worse, this anxiety tends to kick in when you’re trying to sleep off the alcohol.

  • As your blood alcohol level goes down during the night, you’re left with too many receptors and so too much glutamate activity,” says Nutt.
  • And that is why you are too alert, and why the world seems too much.” Compromised glutamate levels also lead to memory loss, forcing your brain to try to fill in the gaps in what you did after hitting that third bottle of wine.

“Because of the physical effects of the anxiety, you tend to think the worst,” says psychotherapist Rachel Buchan. “But not remembering leaves you with this feeling that you lost control of what was happening or what you were doing. It’s horrible.” Before any of you mindful drinkers start to feel smug, it is worth noting that hangxiety is not always alcohol-related, according to clinical psychologist Linda Blair.

  • A lot of social anxiety is caused by a buildup of energy that we don’t know what do with.
  • You’ve been directing all your excitement towards this particular event and now it’s over but the energy is still there, bouncing around.” That is when we start to obsess about what we said and did.
  • You want to use that energy to fix your worry but, of course, you can’t.

You can’t go back in time.” Some of us are more predisposed to ruminate than others. “Certain people are more reflective than they are impulsive,” says Blair. A lot of this is genetic but there is a learned element to it. “They deal with problems by thinking them through again and again until they calm down.

It’s not a good strategy, but it becomes a pattern.” And, of course, we are all a bit rusty since Covid lockdowns. “When you’re socialising, you’re constantly gauging the other person’s feelings and reactions, so you can respond appropriately,” says Blair. “We’re out of practice. This makes us more tired than usual, which can trigger anxious thoughts.” When our bodies are depleted in this way, we tend to think emotionally rather than logically, negatively rather than positively.

Knowing all this probably isn’t going to stop you partying – and nor should it. But before you resign yourself to waking up on 1 January full of self-loathing, there are things you can do to lessen the symptoms of hangxiety. Ones that go beyond paracetamol, ordering from Deliveroo and turning on a reality TV show. “Go for a coffee with someone you were at the party with and you’ll see that they won’t treat you any differently from the way they did before the party,” Blair recommends. “But don’t bring up what you said. All it does is make you look needy – they’ll give you reassurance by enjoying your company.” Just make sure you pick someone sympathetic, not that friend who’ll remind you of the time you cornered that Irish girl in the kitchen so you could rant about your family from Cork.

Buchan advises inhaling and exhaling through your nose rather than your mouth. Four seconds is good but do more or less if that doesn’t feel comfortable. Try to imagine your stomach is a balloon: as you inhale, it expands and as you exhale, it contracts. “This will deepen your breath, which will have a calming impact on your body,” says Buchan.

“You can do it anywhere and no one knows you’re doing it.” “Exercise will help speed up your metabolism and so help shift your hangover,” Nutt says. But avoid anything too strenuous because that can put a strain on the cardiovascular system. Think a light jog or a long walk.

Shuffling to the Co-op in your dressing gown for some Pringles doesn’t count. Sign up to Inside Saturday The only way to get a look behind the scenes of the Saturday magazine. Sign up to get the inside story from our top writers as well as all the must-read articles and columns, delivered to your inbox every weekend.

Privacy Notice: Newsletters may contain info about charities, online ads, and content funded by outside parties. For more information see our, We use Google reCaptcha to protect our website and the Google and apply. after newsletter promotion To avoid that disappointing crash after a party, Blair recommends making sure you have something else exciting in the diary.

  • So when you wake up you think, That was so fun, and I’m so sorry it’s over, but actually, I have that work party on Tuesday so I can get excited about that.
  • If you set up something else immediately, you will give your emotions and your energy a direction.” Sure, your mind is racing and you are sweating a bit thinking about what happened last night, but, advises Blair, don’t just rush to conclusions.

You could choose to call that grouping of symptoms anxiety, she says, but you could just call it a hangover.” Blair says this can help us reframe. “When you think of it in that way, it’s in your control and not taking you over.” Sometimes a hangover is just a hangover.

  1. Everyone at the party is probably feeling the same as you.
  2. And it, too, shall pass.
  3. Alcohol wreaks havoc with our blood sugar levels, which can disturb sleep,” says nutritional therapist Alice Mackintosh.
  4. Another side-effect of high blood sugar is that our bodies release more of the stress hormone cortisol, and, for many, this can lead to anxiety.” Eating something before you go to bed can stabilise blood sugar and absorb some of the alcohol in the gut.
See also:  Can I Use Isopropyl Alcohol To Clean Electronics?

“Aim for some protein and fibre, as these are critical for gut health. If you’re home and need something quick, go for wholegrain toast with peanut butter and banana.” Eggs make the perfect hangover breakfast. “They’re rich in amino acids to aid liver function, protein, B vitamins, nutrients such as choline, and healthy fats to help get you back on your feet,” says Mackintosh.

Eat them on toast with avocado and some mushrooms as both are “rich in detoxifying B-vitamins, folate and antioxidants.” If you’re vegan, go for baked beans instead of eggs, because these provide all-important protein and fibre. You could also pop some supplements containing B vitamins, magnesium, and vitamin C to aid liver function and antioxidants NAC, or milk thistle.

: Do you get ‘hangxiety’? How to cope with an anxious hangover

What is the first night effect?

Introduction – The “first night effect” (FNE) is a well-known phenomenon in polysomnographic (PSG) recordings characterized by decreased total sleep time, lower sleep efficiencies, reduction in REM sleep, and longer REM latencies on the first night of testing ( Agnew, Webb, & Williams,1966 ).

First night data are often excluded in analyses of PSG recordings because they are considered to reflect a period of adaptation that is unrepresentative of usual sleep patterns. Although the FNE has been widely studied in healthy subjects and clinical populations, few studies have systematically examined the causes of FNE.

Some ambulatory PSG studies suggest that providing a comfortable sleeping environment or conducting home recording eliminates or reduces FNE ( Coates et al., 1981 ; Edinger, Marsh, McCall, Erwin, & Lininger, 1997 ; Sharpley, Solomon & Cowen, 1988 ). Other home PSG studies of healthy participants ( Le Bon et al., 2001 ), elderly individuals ( Wauquier, van Sweden, Kerkhof, & Hamphuisen, 1991 ; Edinger, Marsh, McCall, Erwin, & Lininger, 1991 ) and patients with generalized anxiety disorder ( Saletu et al., 1996 ) conclude that adaptation effects occur in certain subgroups regardless of setting.

Others have postulated that adaptation to PSG recording equipment plays a significant role in FNE. Lorenzo and Barbanoj studied the FNE in healthy volunteers during three nonconsecutive sets of laboratory recordings one month apart. They found FNE only in the “very first night” of the first series of recordings ( Lorenzo & Barbanoj, 2002 ).

These results suggest that familiarity with PSG equipment may eliminate FNE in subsequent PSG studies. Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are an important test population for PSG studies that examine FNE. Most patients with PTSD report nightmares and insomnia, which are listed separately in the re-experiencing and hyperarousal clusters in the DSM-IV criteria for the disorder ( First, Spitzer, Williams, & Gibbon, 1996 ).

Subjective sleep disturbances are frequent among patients with PTSD both in treatment seeking ( Roszell, McFall, & Malas, 1991 ) and epidemiologic samples ( Neylan et al., 1998 ), while laboratory-based PSG studies have produced mixed results. A recent meta-analysis of 20 studies found that patients with PTSD had more stage 1 sleep, less slow wave sleep, and greater rapid-eye-movement (REM) density (REM activity/ minutes REM sleep) compared to people without PTSD ( Kobayashi, Boarts, & Delahanty, 2007 ).

Given the high frequency of reported sleep disturbances and the hypothesized state of nighttime hypervigilance in subjects with PTSD, it has been proposed that FNE would be prominent in these subjects, particularly in an unfamiliar sleep environment.

Two laboratory-based PSG studies comparing first night adaptation effects in PTSD subjects and controls have reported mixed findings ( Ross et al., 1999 ; Woodward, Bliwise, Friedman, & Gusman, 1996b ). Ross and colleagues found no differences in adaptation effects in a mixed sample of outpatient and residential treatment PTSD subjects compared to outpatient controls in a laboratory study ( Ross et al., 1999 ).

However, increased REM activity and density was observed in PTSD subjects on the first versus the second night. In contrast, Woodward (1996b) found that FNEs in PTSD subjects were dependent on whether the subjects were currently in a residential treatment program versus outpatient treatment.

  • In this laboratory-based study, PTSD inpatients showed decreased FNEs compared to outpatient controls, whereas PTSD outpatients had enhanced FNE compared to outpatient controls ( Woodward, Bliwise, Friedman, & Gusman, 1996b ).
  • These results suggest that adaptation effects observed in PTSD may reflect enhanced sensitivity to a novel sleeping environment.

As most previous PSG studies in PTSD have been conducted only in the sleep laboratory, it is difficult to discern whether FNEs observed in PTSD represent adaptation to recording equipment, novel sleeping environment, or both. A direct comparison of PSG testing in the two settings would clarify whether the recording context affects the results, allowing for more accurate study and enhanced understanding of PTSD- related sleep disruption.

  1. To date, this is the first study to examine FNE in medically healthy medication-free subjects with PTSD and age-matched controls with two pairs of PSG studies conducted in both home and hospital settings.
  2. We hypothesized that both the PTSD group and the control group would have greater FNE in the hospital than at home, and that the PTSD group would have greater FNE compared to controls in night one versus night two of the study in both settings.

Finally, we hypothesized that adaptation effects in both groups would be attenuated in the second pair of PSG studies.

What to do if you drank too much alcohol?

How is a hangover treated? – Many hangover remedies claim to treat a hangover. But they’re often not based in science, and some can be dangerous. For example, drinking more alcohol (“hair of the dog”) will not cure a hangover. More alcohol just increases the toxicity of the alcohol already in your body. Steps you can take to improve hangover symptoms include:

Eating bland foods with complex carbohydrates, such as toast or crackers. You’ll boost low blood sugar levels and reduce nausea. Drinking water, juice, broth and other non-alcohol beverages to reduce dehydration. Getting sleep to counteract fatigue. Taking antacids to help settle your stomach. Trying aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, to help your headache or muscle ache. However, use them sparingly since they can upset your digestive system. Do not take acetaminophen (Tylenol®) — it can be toxic to your liver when combined with alcohol. Being patient. Hangover symptoms tend to ease up over eight to 24 hours. Your body has to clear the toxic byproducts of alcohol, rehydrate, heal tissue and restore functions and activity to normal.

How do you sleep with hangover anxiety?

Do you get ‘hangxiety’? How to cope with an anxious hangover Y ou’ve got a raging thirst but you can’t drag yourself out of bed for a glass of water. All you remember from last night is going off on one about a man who “hatfished” you on a date while wearing a cap, only to realise the guy listening to you was heavily receding.

None of your friends have messaged you this morning so you assume they must hate you now. You lie in the foetal position and kid yourself into believing you are still asleep so you don’t have to deal with the consequences of your actions. You have “hangxiety” (hangover anxiety) or you are suffering from a “prangover” (pranging out hungover), and it’s the worst feeling in the world.

There’s a scientific reason why drinking makes us feel like this. “Alcohol is one of the most promiscuous of drugs, in that it affects a lot of different types of receptors and hence the majority, if not all, of the neurons,” says David Nutt, professor of neuropsychopharmacology at Imperial College London and author of 2020 book Drink? The New Science of Alcohol and Your Health.

  • That blissed-out state we associate with drinking is caused by alcohol enhancing the Gaba receptors (neurotransmitters that essentially turn off the brain) and this calms you down by making fewer neurons fire.
  • As we enter withdrawal, the brain increases levels of the main excitatory transmitter, glutamate, in an attempt to decrease Gaba, and this chemical imbalance results in anxiety.
See also:  How To Tell If You Have Alcohol Poisoning?

Or, in other words – as Nutt puts it: “The brain is a finely balanced machine. You add in alcohol and that balance dissolves like a sugar cube in hot tea.” Not remembering leaves you feeling you lost control. It’s horrible Rachel Buchan, psychotherapist To make matters worse, this anxiety tends to kick in when you’re trying to sleep off the alcohol.

As your blood alcohol level goes down during the night, you’re left with too many receptors and so too much glutamate activity,” says Nutt. “And that is why you are too alert, and why the world seems too much.” Compromised glutamate levels also lead to memory loss, forcing your brain to try to fill in the gaps in what you did after hitting that third bottle of wine.

“Because of the physical effects of the anxiety, you tend to think the worst,” says psychotherapist Rachel Buchan. “But not remembering leaves you with this feeling that you lost control of what was happening or what you were doing. It’s horrible.” Before any of you mindful drinkers start to feel smug, it is worth noting that hangxiety is not always alcohol-related, according to clinical psychologist Linda Blair.

A lot of social anxiety is caused by a buildup of energy that we don’t know what do with. “You’ve been directing all your excitement towards this particular event and now it’s over but the energy is still there, bouncing around.” That is when we start to obsess about what we said and did. “You want to use that energy to fix your worry but, of course, you can’t.

You can’t go back in time.” Some of us are more predisposed to ruminate than others. “Certain people are more reflective than they are impulsive,” says Blair. A lot of this is genetic but there is a learned element to it. “They deal with problems by thinking them through again and again until they calm down.

  1. It’s not a good strategy, but it becomes a pattern.” And, of course, we are all a bit rusty since Covid lockdowns.
  2. When you’re socialising, you’re constantly gauging the other person’s feelings and reactions, so you can respond appropriately,” says Blair.
  3. We’re out of practice.
  4. This makes us more tired than usual, which can trigger anxious thoughts.” When our bodies are depleted in this way, we tend to think emotionally rather than logically, negatively rather than positively.

Knowing all this probably isn’t going to stop you partying – and nor should it. But before you resign yourself to waking up on 1 January full of self-loathing, there are things you can do to lessen the symptoms of hangxiety. Ones that go beyond paracetamol, ordering from Deliveroo and turning on a reality TV show. “Go for a coffee with someone you were at the party with and you’ll see that they won’t treat you any differently from the way they did before the party,” Blair recommends. “But don’t bring up what you said. All it does is make you look needy – they’ll give you reassurance by enjoying your company.” Just make sure you pick someone sympathetic, not that friend who’ll remind you of the time you cornered that Irish girl in the kitchen so you could rant about your family from Cork.

  1. Buchan advises inhaling and exhaling through your nose rather than your mouth.
  2. Four seconds is good but do more or less if that doesn’t feel comfortable.
  3. Try to imagine your stomach is a balloon: as you inhale, it expands and as you exhale, it contracts.
  4. This will deepen your breath, which will have a calming impact on your body,” says Buchan.

“You can do it anywhere and no one knows you’re doing it.” “Exercise will help speed up your metabolism and so help shift your hangover,” Nutt says. But avoid anything too strenuous because that can put a strain on the cardiovascular system. Think a light jog or a long walk.

Shuffling to the Co-op in your dressing gown for some Pringles doesn’t count. Sign up to Inside Saturday The only way to get a look behind the scenes of the Saturday magazine. Sign up to get the inside story from our top writers as well as all the must-read articles and columns, delivered to your inbox every weekend.

Privacy Notice: Newsletters may contain info about charities, online ads, and content funded by outside parties. For more information see our, We use Google reCaptcha to protect our website and the Google and apply. after newsletter promotion To avoid that disappointing crash after a party, Blair recommends making sure you have something else exciting in the diary.

So when you wake up you think, That was so fun, and I’m so sorry it’s over, but actually, I have that work party on Tuesday so I can get excited about that. If you set up something else immediately, you will give your emotions and your energy a direction.” Sure, your mind is racing and you are sweating a bit thinking about what happened last night, but, advises Blair, don’t just rush to conclusions.

You could choose to call that grouping of symptoms anxiety, she says, but you could just call it a hangover.” Blair says this can help us reframe. “When you think of it in that way, it’s in your control and not taking you over.” Sometimes a hangover is just a hangover.

Everyone at the party is probably feeling the same as you. And it, too, shall pass. “Alcohol wreaks havoc with our blood sugar levels, which can disturb sleep,” says nutritional therapist Alice Mackintosh. “Another side-effect of high blood sugar is that our bodies release more of the stress hormone cortisol, and, for many, this can lead to anxiety.” Eating something before you go to bed can stabilise blood sugar and absorb some of the alcohol in the gut.

“Aim for some protein and fibre, as these are critical for gut health. If you’re home and need something quick, go for wholegrain toast with peanut butter and banana.” Eggs make the perfect hangover breakfast. “They’re rich in amino acids to aid liver function, protein, B vitamins, nutrients such as choline, and healthy fats to help get you back on your feet,” says Mackintosh.

  • Eat them on toast with avocado and some mushrooms as both are “rich in detoxifying B-vitamins, folate and antioxidants.” If you’re vegan, go for baked beans instead of eggs, because these provide all-important protein and fibre.
  • You could also pop some supplements containing B vitamins, magnesium, and vitamin C to aid liver function and antioxidants NAC, or milk thistle.

: Do you get ‘hangxiety’? How to cope with an anxious hangover

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