Is Erythritol Alcohol?

Is Erythritol Alcohol
Erythritol is a sugar alcohol used as a low calorie sweetener.

Is erythritol considered alcohol?

Sugar substitutes have risen and fallen in popularity like fashion trends in decades gone by, stocking favorite foods and drinks before being eclipsed by something deemed tastier, safer, or more natural. The latest to enter the sweetener vernacular: sugar alcohol—or, more specifically, erythritol, which can be found in drinks like Bai Water and increasingly popular light ice cream Halo Top.

Which begs the question: What is sugar alcohol, and what are the associated health risks with consuming it, if any? Octavia Pickett-Blakely, a gastroenterologist and assistant professor at the Perelman School of Medicine, explains the “alcohol” component of sugar alcohol, its relationship to sugar, and how the gastrointestinal tract responds to it in the body.

What is erythritol, otherwise known as sugar alcohol? Sugar alcohols, in general, are a class of sugar derivatives where the alcohol is formed from fermentation of the carbohydrate. Erythritol is part of the class of sugar alcohols. Typically, the sugar alcohols end in ‘-ol,’ and that’s a signal it’s a sugar alcohol.

Erythritol is not the only sugar alcohol; some others are xylitol or mannitol. Those originate from smaller sugar molecules that undergo a fermentation process that changes the chemical structure and results in there being an alcohol component. Erythritol is a derivative of glucose, one of the monosaccharides, or basic sugars, and fermentation can occur from bacteria, or from fungi, to form these sugar alcohols.

When you say ‘alcohol,’ you mean.? Alcohol is a broad umbrella term that refers to the chemical structure, but not alcohol as in beers or sodas. It has some of the common chemical components. And what you’re saying suggests sugar alcohol is related to sugar? It’s a sugar that undergoes the chemical process that converts and then ferments into a sugar alcohol.

  1. How does the body react so differently to sugar, then, by comparison? It depends on the sugar alcohol.
  2. Some sugar alcohols—for example, xylitol–are larger molecules, and these molecules are not necessarily digested by the human body, and when they get into the gastrointestinal tract in particular, the colon, they can attract water.

An adverse effect can be diarrhea as a result of that. Another thing that can happen to large molecules is the bacteria in the colon can ferment those large molecules and cause fermentation leading to gas formation, which can result in bloating. Erythritol is reported to not lead to those effects because erythritol is a smaller molecule, which allows it to be absorbed through the small intestine into the bloodstream, and then it’s eventually excreted into the urine.

  1. So, it’s not broken down the way a normal sugar molecule is, in the sense of raising your blood sugar level.
  2. But it also does not reach the colon completely intact, which is thought to be what could lead to reduced gastrointestinal symptoms.
  3. And that’s for erythritol, in particular? Right.
  4. Compared to xylitol and mannitol.

And those other two are more likely to give you digestive discomfort? Correct. Then why don’t more people use erythritol instead of xylitol or mannitol? Erythritol is a newer sugar alcohol. That’s one reason. Another is that, even though it occurs naturally, in fruits and vegetables, the amount is small.

To mass produce it requires commercial production, and my understanding—I’m not a chemist—is it’s not necessarily as easy to produce in mass as some other sugar alcohols. Erythritol is something you’ll notably find in more recent food items, like Halo Top. Erythritol is Truvia. So, you can buy Truvia commercially.

But you don’t buy xylitol by itself. You’re not going to find xylitol in a bag next to sugar in the grocery store. Artificial sweeteners you’ll find, like Sweet ‘n’ Low. You may find those, as artificial sweeteners, commercially available. But erythritol is in Truvia.

It sounds like these associated problems are more short-term than long-term? Short-term effects. To my knowledge, erythritol is one of the newer sugar alcohols, but it’s been deemed safe in humans. I ran across one study that referred to an adverse effect in the fruit fly, so it’s been looked into as a potential pesticide.

The flies that ingested the erythritol-enhanced food had slower neurological function, and didn’t live as long. But extrapolating what happens with flies and what happens in human physiology is not something that’s appropriate to do. It’s similar to the controversy years back with the aspartame, or Sweet ‘n’ Low, and bladder cancer in rats.

  • Later on, there were reports in the press about artificial sweeteners leading to cancer.
  • It turned out rats had an increased risk of cancer related to something else, and it wasn’t even the Sweet ‘n’ Low.
  • It requires more time and study, but as of now it doesn’t look like, in small and safe amounts, there are any adverse effects to be had.

And it’s new? When I say ‘new,’ I mean in terms of the U.S., in the past few decades. But it was discovered at least 100 years ago. As far as being used in food production and as a sweetener, it’s relatively recent as it comes to be a common household item.

  • Do you ever discourage people from ingesting this sort of thing? From a gastroenterological standpoint.
  • I haven’t had anyone specifically ask me about erythritol.
  • In general, when I assess a patient who has symptoms, I ask about dietary consumption, and do make it a point to ask if they consume artificial sweeteners, or non-nutrient sweeteners, or low-caloric sweeteners, or if someone is drinking five or six Diet Cokes a day, or eating a lot of sugar-free gums or candy, then I advise them to try avoiding them to see if symptoms improve.

In general, when I give patients dietary advice, it’s trying to figure out if it’s something specific they’re eating. And what’s also notable, and perhaps what’s alluring for a lot of folks, is sugar alcohol doesn’t spike blood sugar, right? Interestingly, erythritol is not shown to have significant effects on your blood sugar because even though it is absorbed into the bloodstream, it does not metabolize in a way that glucose does.

  • That doesn’t mean it doesn’t have an impact on insulin.
  • So, if you think about the base of all these sugar alcohols being sugar, or a small carbohydrate, if there’s some way the alcohol portion is separated from the sugar part and it ends up being metabolized back down to the original sugar, there’s a possibility it can be absorbed, enter the blood stream, and raise your blood sugar that way.

It all depends how much the sugar alcohol is metabolized. Most of the larger ones are not metabolized very much. But with bacterial fermentation, if there’s a chemical reaction where some of the smaller sugars are cleaved from the alcohol molecules, I could conceive that it may have some effect on the blood sugar.

Is erythritol or sugar alcohol?

Highlights –

Erythritol is a type of carbohydrate called a sugar alcohol, or polyol. Erythritol is unique from other sugar alcohols because it contains zero calories. Erythritol occurs naturally in a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fermented foods and beverages. It is also commercially produced through fermentation. Our bodies also produce smaller amounts of erythritol during glucose metabolism. Erythritol does not impact blood glucose or insulin secretion and contributes to oral health. Erythritol’s safety has been confirmed by numerous health authorities around the world, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and World Health Organization. Erythritol is approved for use in more than 60 countries.

Is erythritol an organic alcohol?

About Product. Organic Erythritol is a sugar alcohol derived from non-GMO corn and other organic plant sources. It is a naturally-occurring sugar alcohol found in many fruits and vegetables, including pears, grapes, melons, and mushrooms.

Is erythritol sugar alcohol halal?

Conclusion – Yes, the sugar alcohol is halal! Islamic laws permit Muslims to consume sugar alcohol since it can be said to be halal from all studies and research. Its rich health benefits and absence of alcohol make it suitable for the Islam diet. Visit Chewwies store for your delicious, gluten-free, and healthy products!

Does erythritol taste like alcohol?

Though it sounds new, erythritol (ear-RITH-ri-tall) has been around as long as grapes, peaches, pears, watermelon, and mushrooms. It’s a type of carbohydrate called a sugar alcohol that people use as a sugar substitute. Erythritol is found naturally in some foods.

  • It’s also made when things like wine, beer, and cheese ferment.
  • Besides its natural form, erythritol has also been a man-made sweetener since 1990.
  • You can find it with other sugar substitutes in stores and online.
  • It’s also sold in bulk to companies that use it to sweeten or thicken products like reduced-calorie and sugar-free foods and drinks.
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You’ll often find it mixed with popular sugar substitutes like aspartame, stevia, and Truvia to make them sweeter. Calories. Sugar has 4 calories per gram, but erythritol has zero. That’s because your small intestine absorbs it quickly and gets it out of your body through urine within 24 hours.

  • This means erythritol doesn’t have a chance to “metabolize” – turn into energy in your body. Safety.
  • Though erythritol is one of the newer sugar alcohols on the market – xylitol and mannitol have been around longer – researchers have done a number of studies of it in animals and humans.
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) approved erythritol in 1999, and the FDA did the same in 2001.

It’s also OK for people with diabetes, Erythritol has no effect on glucose or insulin levels. This makes it a safe sugar substitute if you have diabetes. Foods that contain erythritol may still contain carbohydrates, calories, and fat, so it’s important to check the label.

Taste. Erythritol tastes sweet. It’s similar to table sugar. Appearance. It’s in the form of white crystal granules or powder. How much can I eat? There aren’t official guidelines on using erythritol, but most people can handle 1 gram for every kilogram of body weight daily. So if you weigh 150 pounds, you can tolerate 68 grams of erythritol a day, or more than 13 teaspoons.

How it’s used. You can use erythritol the same way as sugar. It’s fine to stir it into your coffee or tea, sprinkle it on grapefruit, or bake with it. Remember that it’s a sugar substitute and not real sugar, so foods that you bake may have a different taste or consistency than you’re used to.

Side effects. Eating lots of sugar alcohols can lead to bloating and an upset stomach, Some sugar alcohols can cause gas and cramping or work like a laxative when they reach your colon, But erythritol is generally mostly absorbed before it gets to your colon and is excreted unchanged in your urine. Excess gas and a laxative effect are possible, but people generally handle it better than other sugar alcohols, and it doesn’t come with any warnings.

OK for your teeth, In most cases, bacteria in your mouth break down regular sugars and starches and turn them into acid. This can wear down your enamel and cause cavities, But the FDA says erythritol is good for oral health because it slows the growth of one type of bacteria and decreases the acid that bacteria make.

Is erythritol halal?

Erythritol › Erythritol Replace your table sugar with Erythritol, a low-GI natural sweetener, found naturally in fruits such as pears, grapes and melons, Erythritol has 70% relative sweetness compared to table sugar. It is a low-caloric sugar and has a GI of 1.

Low Glycemic Index of 1 Vegan Friendly Keto- Friendly Trans-Fat Free Cholesterol Free Gluten Free Halal-Certified 100% erythritol in powder form Net Weight: 300g

Note: Excess consumption may lead to diarrhoea. Select Language 简体中文 English Bahasa Melayu : Erythritol

Is erythritol bad for you?

At a Glance –

Higher blood levels of the artificial sweetener erythritol were associated with increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The results highlight the need for further study of erythritol’s long-term risks for cardiovascular health.

Artificial sweeteners have become a widespread way to reduce sugar and calorie intake. Regulatory agencies generally consider artificial sweeteners to be safe. But little is known about their long-term health consequences. Growing evidence points to a link between certain artificial sweeteners and cardiovascular problems.

But the connection hasn’t yet been proven. Erythritol is a common artificial sweetener. Low amounts occur naturally in fruits and vegetables. It is also made inside our cells as part of normal metabolism. But when used as a sweetener, erythritol levels are typically more than 1,000-fold greater than levels found naturally in foods.

Erythritol is in an ingredient category called “sugar alcohols,” which are not required to be listed individually on Nutrition Facts labels. An NIH-funded research team led by Dr. Stanley Hazen at the Cleveland Clinic examined the relationship between erythritol and heart attacks and stroke.

  1. In an initial study with more than 1,000 people, the team looked for compounds in blood whose levels were linked to future cardiac risk.
  2. They tracked major adverse cardiovascular events over three years, including death and nonfatal heart attack or stroke.
  3. Results appeared in Nature Medicine on February 27, 2023.

The team found that elevated levels of erythritol and several related artificial sweeteners were associated with the risk for cardiovascular events. To confirm this result, the researchers examined two more groups of people in the U.S. and Europe totaling almost 3,000.

They also developed a method to better distinguish erythritol from related compounds. These measurements reproduced the association between erythritol and cardiovascular events. People with the highest erythritol levels (top 25%) were about twice as likely to have cardiovascular events over three years of follow-up as those with the lowest (bottom 25%).

Next, the team wanted to better understand how erythritol might increase these health risks. So, they exposed human platelets, which control blood clotting, to erythritol. Doing so increased the platelets’ sensitivity to blood clotting signals. Increasing blood erythritol levels also sped up blood clot formation and artery blockage in mice.

The scientists next asked how diet affects erythritol levels in people. To find out, they measured blood erythritol levels in eight healthy volunteers after drinking a beverage sweetened with erythritol. Blood erythritol levels increased 1,000-fold and remained substantially elevated for several days.

For at least two days, the erythritol levels grew more than high enough to trigger changes in platelet function. These results suggest that consuming erythritol can increase blood clot formation. This, in turn, could increase the risk of heart attack or stroke.

  1. Given the prevalence of erythritol in artificially sweetened foods, further safety studies of the health risks of erythritol are warranted.
  2. Sweeteners like erythritol have rapidly increased in popularity in recent years, but there needs to be more in-depth research into their long-term effects,” Hazen says.

“Cardiovascular disease builds over time, and heart disease is the leading cause of death globally. We need to make sure the foods we eat aren’t hidden contributors.” —by Brian Doctrow, Ph.D.

Is erythritol good or bad for you?

Is erythritol safe? – Overall, erythritol appears to be very safe. Multiple studies on its toxicity and effects on metabolism have been performed in animals. Erythritol has been found safe for both human and animal consumption ( 2 ). However, there is one major caveat to most sugar alcohols: They can cause digestive issues.

Because of their unique chemical structure, your body can’t digest them, and they pass unchanged through most of your digestive system until they reach your colon. In your colon, they’re fermented by the resident bacteria, which produce gas as a byproduct. Consequently, eating large amounts of sugar alcohols may cause bloating and digestive upset.

In fact, sugar alcohols belong to a category of fibers known as FODMAPs, But erythritol is different from the other sugar alcohols. Most of it gets absorbed into your bloodstream before it reaches your colon ( 3 ). It circulates in your blood for a while and is eventually excreted, unchanged, in your urine.

Is erythritol natural or chemical?

Is Erythritol Natural or Artificial? Erythritol is widely promoted as a natural sweetener for being found in nature, but it is, in fact, a synthetic sweetener. A sweetener that does not occur in the plant from which it is manufactured is a synthetic sweetener.

How much erythritol is safe per day?

Is It Safe? – How safe is erythritol? As of 1997, erythritol has earned the status of “generally recognized as safe” by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The food industry and consumers love it because it has a similar sweet taste as sugar, but it’s noncaloric and does not raise blood sugar levels.

Although there are some concerns with sugar alcohols, studies thus far suggest that erythritol is unlikely to do any more harm when consumed in normal amounts. Research shows that it’s rapidly absorbed in the small intestine but poorly metabolized, and it may not carry the same health benefits as other natural sweeteners that serve as sugar substitutes — such as monk fruit or raw honey.

In order to avoid potential side effects, it’s recommended that adults consume no more than 0.45 grams of erythritol per pound of body weight per day (or one gram of erythritol per kilogram of body weight), which would be 68 grams of erythritol for someone weighing 150 pounds.

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Does erythritol break a fast?

Does Erythritol Break a Fast ? – Erythritol is a common sugar alcohol. Generally, sugar alcohols present a chemical structure similar to sugar and alcohol, but because they are neither, your body will metabolize it differently. Erythritol itself provides only 0.24 calories/gram, which is very minimal.

However, stevia has 0 calories per gram, which might make it a better choice. Since erythritol has very low calories, it might not affect the body’s ability to stay in ketosis or burn fat. However, it will stimulate your digestive tract, because about 90% of it is absorbed in your gut. Various studies have shown that consuming erythritol causes the body to secret two gut peptides for nutrient intake.

Thus, if you consume erythritol, your gut will need to work to absorb it, even if it doesn’t significantly add to your calorie intake. Research remains limited on erythirtol’s impact on longevity. However, because erythritol is a protein-free substance and provides the body little in the way of energy, it is generally safe to assume that it doesn’t affect autophagy.

What is the news about erythritol?

Now a new study has found that a popular artificial sweetener called Erythritol has been linked to greater risk of blood clots that could lead to heart attacks or strokes. Erythritol is used in sugar substitutes like Splenda Naturals and Truvia.

Is erythritol fermented?

Erythritol ( Chapter 2 ) – To date, erythritol is the only polyol not made commercially by reduction; it is made by a fermentation process.5 Erythritol has a clean sweet taste and is about 70% as sweet as sucrose. It is nonhygroscopic. Consumption of erythritol does not produce laxation.

  1. To date, erythritol has largely been used in combination with other substances (for economic reasons).
  2. A 2:3 blend of erythritol and sorbitol is reported to improve chewing gum coatings.
  3. A blend of erythritol, inulin Chapter 17 ), and isomalt (Section on Isomalt below) is reported to be effective in production of sugar-free chocolate products with improved digestive tolerance (as compared to maltitol) in addition to producing a very low glycemic response ( Chapter 17 ).

Erythritol is used together with the high-potency sweetener stevia (Section on High-potency Sweeteners below) in soft drinks both to add bulk and to provide a sweet taste similar to that of sucrose. A blend of erythritol, tagatose (below), and a maltodextrin mimics the taste, texture, and mouthfeel of sucrose. Read full chapter URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128120699000194

Is erythritol inflammatory?

2.8. Erythritol Decreased the Expression of Genes Related to Inflammation, Glucose Transporters, and Fatty Acid Transporters in the Small Intestine – We investigated gene expression in the small intestine. The expression of Il-22, a cytokine that is secreted by ILC3 and induces the expression of mucin genes in mucosal epithelial cells via STAT3-dependent signaling, was significantly elevated in the Ery group ( p = 0.0003; Figure 6 A). Erythritol decreased the expression of inflammation-related genes in the small intestine and white adipose tissue. ( A ) Il22, ( B ) Il6, ( C ) Il1b, ( D ) Il23a, ( E ) Sglt1, and ( F ) Cd36 gene expression in the small intestine ( n = 6). ( G ) Il5, ( H ) Il13, ( I ) Il33, ( J ) Il1b, ( K ) Tnfa, ( L ) Il6, and ( M ) Pparg gene expression in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) ( n = 6). ( N ) Scd1 and ( O ) Fasn gene expression in liver (n = 6). Data have been represented in terms of mean ± SD values. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001, and **** p < 0.0001 using an unpaired t -test.

Why is sugar not halal?

5. Sugar – Sugar seems like a straightforward case – it’s a pure, plant-based food, so there shouldn’t be any questions about Halal suitability. But, some sugar is refined using bone char as a part of the bleaching process. If the bone char was derived from non-Halal cattle, the sugar would no longer be Halal.

Why do monks fruit erythritol?

Why is there erythritol in Lakanto Monk Fruit Sweeteners? – We use it in our Lakanto Monkfruit Sweeteners as a way to make a convenient one-to-one sugar replacement. It’s first important to understand that neither monk fruit, nor erythritol can match the sweetness of sugar by themselves.

  1. Monk fruit is much too sweet, being about 200-300 times sweeter than sugar; and Erythritol is only about 70% as sweet as sugar.
  2. Because of this, the combination of the two (in a very special recipe) is where magic happens in matching the flavor of sugar.
  3. Monk fruit is the key ingredient.
  4. We believe giving up sugar is one of the best choices we can make for our health.

And a one-to-one sugar substitute is the most simple solution for people starting a healthier, sugar-free life without disrupting their normal cooking and baking routines.

Can erythritol cause weight gain?

Erythritol: A Healthy Sweetener To Replace Processed Sugar- HealthifyMe Erythritol is a naturally great sweetener and is extremely popular. It is a common sweetener in low-calorie foods, sweets, and bakery products. Erythritol is a carbohydrate that is a sugar alcohol and is a sugar substitute.

It is a naturally occurring substance in many fruits like peaches, grapes, pears,, etc. It is also present in certain mushrooms. Erythritol appears in the form of crystal granules or powdered form. It has a very similar taste to table sugar. It is possible to use Erythritol in the same way as sugar. It’s acceptable to mix it into coffee or tea, sprinkle it on grapefruit, or use it in baking.

Remember that this is a sugar substitute, not natural sugar. So your baked goods may have a different flavour or consistency than you’re used to. Despite its carbohydrate-based origin and name, the body does not absorb Erythritol, and its consumption will not lead to weight gain.

Sugar alcohols offer the sweetening effect that this chemical provides. Sugar alcohols do not degrade in the body and do not contribute to your regular carbohydrate consumption. Some show how Erythritol is toxic to fruit flies. As a result, agricultural firms may be able to employ it as an effective pesticide that is also safe for human consumption.

We will discuss the effectiveness of reducing weight gain later in this text. When consumed in moderation as part of a balanced diet, Erythritol is unlikely to be hazardous.

Is erythritol xylitol?

Both natural sweeteners found in fruits and plants which are used as a lower calorie, natural sugar alternative, and are often used by those trying to maintain their blood sugar levels. They are sugar alcohols. To get technical: “alcohol” is simply referring to a chemical structure.

Sugar alcohols are modified forms of sugar and not technically an actual sugar, which is why foods containing erythritol and xylitol can be labeled “sugar-free.” Unlike sugar, honey, and maple syrup, they not trigger a spike in the blood glucose as well as a response in insulin, which can cause diabetes and weight gain.

It has been researched that Erythritol is better in terms of:

Better aftertaste, preferred sugar substitute for people with diabetes, promotes oral health and doesn’t lead to tooth decay, and xylitol also aids in the prevention of cavities and reduces plaque formation. Causes less digestive distress. (unlike Xylitol has gastrointestinal side effects from xylitol, such as gas, bloating and diarrhea, and digestive stress) Erythritol has a Lower GI than Xylitol Xylitol contains 2.4 calories per gram while Erythritol contains 0.2 calories per gram. Xylitol is 100% as sweet as sugar. Erythritol is 70% as sweet as sugar

Although they are both naturally found in fruits and plants, they go through different processes when they’re commercially produced for use as sweeteners. Erythritol is usually produced by fermenting another natural sugar, glucose, while xylitol is extracted from corncobs or trees Are you a sugar-free baker? Xylitol adds moisture to baked goods and gives a sheen to frostings.

  1. Erythritol creates the same shiny effect in low-calorie chocolate, adds bulk to dairy products and improves shelf life in baked goods 1 Cup Sugar = 1 + ⅓ Cup Erythritol 1 Cup Sugar = 1 Cup Xylitol *Note: Xylitol is toxic to dogs/animals.
  2. Ensure that your animals do not get hold of it, and do not make any treats for your pets using Xylitol.
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How it’s made? For those who want to know a little more about these sweeteners, here you go: Xylitol is extracted from corncobs or hardwood trees. It ranks seven on the glycemic scale. Our, YouFirst Xylitol, is made from corncobs. Corncobs are a preferred source for xylitol, it is much more sustainable and environmentally friendly.

  • In China, most corn is harvested by hand and so at the harvest there are big piles of corn cobs that need to be disposed of.
  • To get rid of this they build xylitol production facilities.
  • Erythritol, is a sugar alcohol made from sugar with a fermenting agent added.
  • It is naturally found in fruits such as cantaloupe as well as in grapes.

It is also a natural byproduct of the fermentation of bacteria in our digestive system. It is normally made from glucose that is created from corn or wheat starch. @Livestrong explains the process to us in a bit more details: “the starch is first treated with enzymes (special proteins) that break the starch down into glucose.

This glucose is then mixed with yeast, such as Moniliella pollinis or Trichosporonoides megachliensis, and the yeast ferments the glucose to form erythritol. The fermented mixture is then heated (in order to kill off the yeast) an dried (by boiling off all the water) so that erythritol crystals are formed.

These crystals are then washed (to remove impurities), redissolved, purified again (using a special kind of chemical filter) and finally are isolated in solid form, at which point the erythritol is safe for human consumption.” Research sources: http://www.differencebetween.net/object/comparisons-of-food-items/processed-foods/difference-between-xylitol-and-erythritol/ https://www.livestrong.com/article/22548-erythritol-made/

Is erythritol a drug?

Erythritol is a four-carbon sugar that is found in algae, fungi, and lichens. It is twice as sweet as sucrose and can be used as a coronary vasodilator.

Is erythritol intoxicating?

Let’s Talk About Erythritol and Why It’s Safe A supplement doesn’t work if nobody takes it. That’s why our Chief Product Officer, Rob Bent, took taste seriously when developing Som Sleep. How does he describe it? Berry with a twist. How does he achieve it? Using a natural sweetener system that includes erythritol.

What it is: Erythritol is a “sugar alcohol” found naturally in some fruits, vegetables, and fermented foods. Think: pears, melons, mushrooms, and wine. Despite its name, erythritol will not get you drunk. Sorry to disappoint. Its “alcohol” moniker simply describes its molecular structure. We use erythritol in Som as a natural, low-calorie sweetener.

What it does: Erythritol is about 70% as sweet as sugar, but contains 95% fewer calories. It’s unique in that its sweetness is very similar to sugar, but it doesn’t raise your blood sugar level or contribute to tooth decay. To top it off, using erythritol lets you avoid the tummy aches associated with other sugar alcohols like xylitol, sorbitol, and maltitol.

Why we use it: We use erythritol as one part of the natural sweetener system in Som. We pair it with stevia and cane sugar in our original version, while our sugar free option includes stevia and monk fruit extract instead. Erythritol provides an excellent sweetness profile to help balance the other ingredients in the natural sweetener system.

Its clean taste and low caloric content help make Som an easy addition to your sleep regimen. : Let’s Talk About Erythritol and Why It’s Safe

Is erythritol fermented?

Erythritol ( Chapter 2 ) – To date, erythritol is the only polyol not made commercially by reduction; it is made by a fermentation process.5 Erythritol has a clean sweet taste and is about 70% as sweet as sucrose. It is nonhygroscopic. Consumption of erythritol does not produce laxation.

To date, erythritol has largely been used in combination with other substances (for economic reasons). A 2:3 blend of erythritol and sorbitol is reported to improve chewing gum coatings. A blend of erythritol, inulin Chapter 17 ), and isomalt (Section on Isomalt below) is reported to be effective in production of sugar-free chocolate products with improved digestive tolerance (as compared to maltitol) in addition to producing a very low glycemic response ( Chapter 17 ).

Erythritol is used together with the high-potency sweetener stevia (Section on High-potency Sweeteners below) in soft drinks both to add bulk and to provide a sweet taste similar to that of sucrose. A blend of erythritol, tagatose (below), and a maltodextrin mimics the taste, texture, and mouthfeel of sucrose. Read full chapter URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128120699000194

Is it safe to drink erythritol?

At a Glance –

Higher blood levels of the artificial sweetener erythritol were associated with increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The results highlight the need for further study of erythritol’s long-term risks for cardiovascular health.

Artificial sweeteners have become a widespread way to reduce sugar and calorie intake. Regulatory agencies generally consider artificial sweeteners to be safe. But little is known about their long-term health consequences. Growing evidence points to a link between certain artificial sweeteners and cardiovascular problems.

  • But the connection hasn’t yet been proven.
  • Erythritol is a common artificial sweetener.
  • Low amounts occur naturally in fruits and vegetables.
  • It is also made inside our cells as part of normal metabolism.
  • But when used as a sweetener, erythritol levels are typically more than 1,000-fold greater than levels found naturally in foods.

Erythritol is in an ingredient category called “sugar alcohols,” which are not required to be listed individually on Nutrition Facts labels. An NIH-funded research team led by Dr. Stanley Hazen at the Cleveland Clinic examined the relationship between erythritol and heart attacks and stroke.

In an initial study with more than 1,000 people, the team looked for compounds in blood whose levels were linked to future cardiac risk. They tracked major adverse cardiovascular events over three years, including death and nonfatal heart attack or stroke. Results appeared in Nature Medicine on February 27, 2023.

The team found that elevated levels of erythritol and several related artificial sweeteners were associated with the risk for cardiovascular events. To confirm this result, the researchers examined two more groups of people in the U.S. and Europe totaling almost 3,000.

They also developed a method to better distinguish erythritol from related compounds. These measurements reproduced the association between erythritol and cardiovascular events. People with the highest erythritol levels (top 25%) were about twice as likely to have cardiovascular events over three years of follow-up as those with the lowest (bottom 25%).

Next, the team wanted to better understand how erythritol might increase these health risks. So, they exposed human platelets, which control blood clotting, to erythritol. Doing so increased the platelets’ sensitivity to blood clotting signals. Increasing blood erythritol levels also sped up blood clot formation and artery blockage in mice.

  • The scientists next asked how diet affects erythritol levels in people.
  • To find out, they measured blood erythritol levels in eight healthy volunteers after drinking a beverage sweetened with erythritol.
  • Blood erythritol levels increased 1,000-fold and remained substantially elevated for several days.

For at least two days, the erythritol levels grew more than high enough to trigger changes in platelet function. These results suggest that consuming erythritol can increase blood clot formation. This, in turn, could increase the risk of heart attack or stroke.

  • Given the prevalence of erythritol in artificially sweetened foods, further safety studies of the health risks of erythritol are warranted.
  • Sweeteners like erythritol have rapidly increased in popularity in recent years, but there needs to be more in-depth research into their long-term effects,” Hazen says.

“Cardiovascular disease builds over time, and heart disease is the leading cause of death globally. We need to make sure the foods we eat aren’t hidden contributors.” —by Brian Doctrow, Ph.D.

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