Is Panthenol Alcohol?

Is Panthenol Alcohol
– Panthenol is an alcohol derivative of vitamin B5, or pantothenic acid. It is a stable, water-soluble, light ingredient that readily penetrates the skin. At room temperature, panthenol is typically a viscous, transparent oil or white powder. It is structurally similar to vitamin B5 except that it contains a hydroxyl group, making it an alcohol.

What is panthenol made from?

– Panthenol is a chemical substance made from pantothenic acid, also known as vitamin B-5. It occurs organically and can also be produced from both plant and animal sources. It’s used as an additive in various cosmetic products around the globe. You very likely have pantothenic acid in your system right now, since it occurs in so many common food sources.

dexpanthenolD-pantothenyl alcoholbutanamidealcohol analog of pantothenic acid provitamin B-5

When absorbed into the body, panthenol becomes vitamin B-5.

Is panthenol halal to use?

D-Panthenol is certified with SC, Kosher, Halal, BRC, ISO22000:2005, ISO9001:2008, OHSAS 18001:1999 and ISO 14001:2004.

What category is panthenol?

Panthenol is an alcohol derivative of pantothenic acid, a component of the B complex vitamins and an essential component of a normally functioning epithelium.

Is panthenol soluble in alcohol?

It is easily soluble in water and alcohol, moderately soluble in diethyl ether, soluble in chloroform (1:100), in propylene glycol, and slightly soluble in glycerin.

Is Cetearyl an alcohol?

– Cetearyl alcohol is a fatty alcohol that can soften the skin and hair. It also stabilizes products that contain a mixture of oil and water, and changes the thickness of liquids. Because of these properties, it is a popular ingredient in many cosmetics and toiletries.

Is panthenol powder natural?

Panthenol Powder is a synthetically produced ingredient created by combining propanolamine and beta-dimethylbutyrolactone.

Is alcohol in hair products halal?

Right intentions: Why alcohol use in halal beauty and personal care products is permitted One of the most common misconceptions about halal beauty products is that they cannot include alcohol, and this has led to many alcohol-free beauty offerings in the halal market. The alcohol-free claim is especially touted in perfumes, which conventionally can contain up to 80% or 90% of alcohol.

In truth, even though alcohol is considered haram – which means prohibited or sinful – multiple halal authorities and Islamic scholars have agreed that alcohol use in medicine and personal care is permissible as it does not intoxicate the user.According to the Halal Products Research Institute (HPRI) of Universiti Putra Malaysia, the use of alcohol in products like perfumes is permitted under Islamic laws.Quoting its own research and the Fatwa Committee of the National Council for Malaysian Islamic Religious Affairs dialogue held in 2011, HPRI concluded that ‘not all alcohol is khamr’. ​

Khamr is an Arabic word for intoxicant and refers to items such as alcoholic beverages. According to HPRI, an alcohol that is not from a Khamr source can be used in medicine and cosmetic products. Similarly, the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore or Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura (MUIS), has given the green light for Muslims to use perfumes that contain alcohol.

“Most modern perfumes contain alcohol as a solvent and/or to speed up the dispersion of the smelling agent. This alcohol usually comes from the industrial chemical process of producing ethyl alcohol. It does not come from the usual fermentation of carbohydrates such as fruits. Most contemporary ulama are of the view that industrially produced alcohol from chemical process is not najis since it is poisonous and cannot be consumed.” ​ Under Islamic law, najis means spiritually unclean.

Alcohol, when derived from a non-khamr source, is considered not najis and permissible for Muslims to use.

Is panthenol vegan?

There’s a lot of alarmist information out there that can really scare vegans – However, it’s important to apply common sense to avoid getting scared by false information. The modern industrial food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries are motivated by profit, and the fact is that livestock management, even in the horrific conditions they experience in the factory farming industry, is not as cost-effective as using plant-based alternatives or synthesizing chemical compounds in a lab.

  1. In many cases (but not all!), manufacturers will choose to use the botanical or synthetic option.
  2. This is not to say that you shouldn’t be vigilant; many animal-derived ingredients sneak into seemingly vegan products, and it’s important to educate yourself with accurate information.
  3. When in doubt, do your research, stick with trusted brands, and be sure to look out for product labels with symbols and fine print certifying a product as vegan.

You may see some of the ingredients on this list that are also on the ingredients list of a product certified as vegan, In those cases, you can research the certifying organization for reassurance that the form of the potentially animal-derived ingredient on the list is actually either synthetic or derived from plants.

  1. This list covers some of the most common animal-derived ingredients and some more obscure or misleadingly labeled ingredients that vegans should either avoid entirely or carefully research to determine the exact origin.
  2. Aioli: An emulsified sauce or condiment frequently made with egg yolks.
  3. In some cases, the sauce may be a mix of olive oil and garlic, which is vegan.

Albumen: Protein derived from egg whites and occasionally from blood. Most often used in foods. Alcohols: Industrial alcohols such as aliphatic alcohol, fatty alcohols, cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, lauryl alcohol, oleyl alcohol etc. Though they can be derived from animal sources, most industrial alcohols are synthesized through the fermentation and processing of plants such as wheat, corn, and olives.

  1. Fatty alcohols are usually sourced from vegetable oils, including coconut and canola.
  2. Most often used in beauty and personal care products as an emulsifier, foaming agent, or surfactant.
  3. See LANOLIN for exception.
  4. Angora: A type of wool derived from rabbit fur.
  5. Can be spun into yarn to create knit fabrics.

Animal Hormones: Adrenaline, thyroid hormone T4, cortisol/hydrocortisone, and progesterone are all naturally occurring hormones found in many animals, including humans and livestock animals. These hormones are often available in synthetic form and may also be derived from plants.

Used for medical applications, including over-the-counter and prescription drugs. Ambergris: A traditional perfume scent derived from the digestive system of the sperm whale. Still used in some high-end perfumes, but the ingredient is very expensive and therefore not common. Synthetic versions have been developed as well.

Products made and sold in the USA are legally barred from including this and other ingredients sourced from marine mammals, but products made in other countries may include this ingredient. Amylase: An enzyme found in animal and human saliva. Can be used for medical and personal care products.

Aspic: A gelatin-based dish that uses stock made from fish, cow, pig, or chicken bones to create a jelly-like substance in which food is held together for presentation. Bone Ash: A white powdered substance made from the refined ash of burned animal bones. Used as a food additive and as an anticaking agent for granulated foods such as salt and dried herbs or spices.

Also known as bone phosphate of lime. Possibly also referred to as calcium phosphate or tribasic calcium phosphate, but these can also be synthetic. Boneblack/Bone Charcoal: A black pigment extracted from burned animal bones. Often used for black tattoo inks.

  • Vegan tattoo ink is available.
  • Bone Char/Natural Carbon: Charcoal made from animal bones used in the processing and filtration of a variety of foods and beverages, including refined white sugar and some liquors.
  • Bone Meal: A traditional organic fertilizer made from crushed animal bones.
  • Because it is a source of calcium, it may be used in calcium supplements and multivitamins.

Calcium Silicate: A chemical compound used in a wide range of industrial practices, including the manufacturing of food and plant fertilizers. May be made from ingredients derived from animal bones. Carmine: Also known as carmine cochineal, carminic acid, or Natural Red #4, carmine is a red dye made from insect shells.

Found in some red, orange, purple or pink candy, juices, red-dyed pasta, wine and candles among other products. Cashmere: A type of wool prized for its softness. Derived from the cashmere goat. Used for high-end clothing, accessories, and housewares. Castoreum: A natural secretion from beaver and muskrat scent glands located near the base of the animal’s tail.

Though once used as a flavoring and scent agent, it is rarely found in mass-produced commercial products though it may be used in specialty perfumes. NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH castor oil, a completely plant-based oil made from castor beans. Castor oil is vegan and is a widely used substitute for castoreum.

  1. Chitosan: A chemical compound derived from the shells of shellfish such as crabs and shrimp and is used in a variety of different industrial contexts.
  2. It can be used as a pesticide for fruits and vegetables such as bananas and as a preservative in winemaking.
  3. Civet Absolute: A perfuming and flavoring agent made from the musk of the civet cat.

Civet cats are also used to create civet coffee ; the animal first ingests the coffee beans, then excretes them. The musk transfer from excretion is considered a flavoring agent for the coffee. Cod Liver Oil: A fatty oil extracted from the livers of codfish.

  • Often used in dietary supplements or sold on its own as a supplement for essential fatty acids (EFA).
  • Collagen: A protein found in skin, cartilage, bone, and other animal bodily tissues.
  • Found in many different food products that contain gelatin (see below) and in a variety of different beauty products.

Also used as a dietary supplement for bone health. Cysteine: Also known as L-cysteine, this amino acid is used in various manufacturing processes, including the production of commercial bread and dough products, and is sourced primarily from bird feathers and human hair.

  • Can also be found in cigarettes.
  • Synthetic versions are also available, but there is a large market for L-cysteine derived from human hair.
  • Disodium Isonate: A food additive that can be derived from animal sources or plants.
  • Down: A fine, delicate feather produced as an insulating base feather layer in birds.

Used as a filling for pillows, blankets, comforters, jackets, vests and other warm garments and bedding items. Elastin: An animal-derived ingredient that comes from connective tissues. Often combined with collagen in beauty products. Synthetic alternatives may be available.

Faux Pearl: An iridescent ingredient created by crushing pearly seashells. Used in makeup to create a shimmery effect. Fish Scales: A common ingredient in makeup with shimmery or iridescent qualities. Scales are removed from fish and ground into powder to be mixed in with makeup such as lipstick or eyeshadow.

Vegan makeup uses alternative ingredients such as minerals. Gelatin: A coagulant and food thickener derived from animal bones, skin and other parts containing collagen. Gelatin is used to thicken and solidify a wide range of foods, including gummy bears, fruit-flavored jello, and marshmallows.

  • Ghee: Clarified butter.
  • Created by heating butter and straining the solids.
  • This dairy product is often used in Indian and other Southeast Asian cooking traditions.
  • Glycerides: A class of chemical compounds formed through the use of fatty acids.
  • Monoglycerides and diglycerides used in commercially prepared food and personal care products may be made from fatty acids derived from animal sources.

Plant-derived glycerides are also in use, but the distinction may not be made clear on product labels. Glycerol: Also known as glycerine or glycerin, this colorless, odorless liquid is used as a sweetener in food products and can also be found in personal care products such as soap.

There are some pharmaceutical applications as well. Glycerol is derived from both animal and plant sources, and while it is possible to create synthetic glycerol, it’s most commonly used in its natural form. Products containing glycerol that don’t specify whether they’re vegan are best avoided. Guanine: Also known as pearl essence when used in personal care and beauty products.

Derived from various animal sources, including bird excrement. Horseradish: A spicy paste made from the horseradish, a type of radish. Does not contain any horse, but when mixed with other ingredients such as mayonnaise, it may contain animal products.

  • India Ink: A common black ink used in painting and calligraphy that often uses non-vegan ingredients like ivory black and shellac.
  • Isinglass: A gelatin derived from fish.
  • It’s commonly used to clarify beer, wine and other alcoholic beverages.
  • Beers from the United Kingdom tend to be filtered with isinglass.

Ivory Black: A black pigment made from charred animal bones. Used to create black inks. Keratin: A fibrous protein derived from animal hair, bones, hooves, nails, claws, shells, and beaks. Used in haircare and other beauty products. Krab: Also known as crab sticks, imitation crab meat or krab sticks.

  1. This is a crabmeat substitute that uses both vegetable starch and pulverized fish meat to create what some believe is a vegetarian alternative to crab.
  2. Lactic Acid: A naturally occurring acid that is found in animal muscles and dairy products.
  3. Can be used as a preservative or flavoring agent for foods such as pickles and sour candy.

Lactose: A sugar naturally derived from milk. Can be used as a flavoring agent in processed foods. Lanolin: A waxy secretion that is produced by wooly mammals like sheep. Commonly used in beauty products and also used as a source of dietary vitamin D for some vitamin-D-fortified beverages and foods.

  1. Lard: Pig fat.
  2. Often used as an ingredient or flavoring agent in foods such as baked goods or potato chips.
  3. May be included in refried beans and other seemingly vegan foods.
  4. Leather: The tanned hides (skins) of various animals, including ostrich, alligator, snake, stingray, eel, cow, sheep and others.
  5. Used for clothing, accessories and some types of tools and industrial equipment.

May be dyed bright colors. Vegan alternatives are available. Lecithin: An emulsifier and hydrophobic repellant used to homogenize food mixtures and create nonstick coatings. Derived from several animal-based sources but also frequently extracted from plant sources as well.

Soy lecithin is a particularly common ingredient and is more widely used than animal-derived lecithin. Marabou: A type of feather taken from the marabou stork. Mink Oil: An oily substance created through the rendering of mink fat that results from the fur industry. Used for a variety of personal care and cosmetic applications, including as a shoe polish and as an ingredient in some medications.

Musk: A glandular secretion sourced from a variety of animals, including deer and oxen. Used in colognes, perfumes and some food products. Synthetic alternatives are available. Natural Flavor/Color: A catchall term for organically derived flavoring ingredients included in proportions that are not legally required to be disclosed in specific.

This may include animal-derived substances such as broth or cheese. If in doubt, look into what specific ingredients are included in the product, look for vegan certification, or choose a different product. Nondairy: Though the word implies an absence of dairy products, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows this label on foods that include a very small proportion of dairy ingredients.

Do not assume that a product labeled as “nondairy” is vegan; read the ingredients list and other disclosures. Oil Pastels: An artistic medium that’s often made through a combination of pigments and animal fat. Vegan options may be available. Omega-3 Fatty Acid: An essential fatty acid that’s an important building block of health and wellness.

Often derived from oily fish such as anchovies, salmon, and cod. Botanical sources such as avocadoes and nuts are abundant. Only fatty, oily foods contain omega-3 fatty acids; foods such as orange juice that is advertised as containing omega-3 are fortified with what may be animal-derived substances. Oxgall/Ox Bile: A digestive fluid sourced from cows.

Used as a wetting agent for artistic media and, rarely, beauty products. Watercolor paints in particular tend to use oxgall as an ingredient, though vegan options are available. Panthenol: An alcohol form of vitamin B sourced from both plants and animals.

Commonly used in beauty products and topical medical ointments for moisturizing and skin-penetrating properties. Products containing panthenol that don’t specify whether they’re vegan are best avoided. Parchment: A type of paper made using animal skin. Mostly out of use now, animal-derived parchment is often seen in antique books and documents.

Modern parchment paper is now primarily made from botanical sources such as wood cellulose. Pearl: A natural gemstone produced by living animals such as mollusks (particularly oysters). Natural pearls are not vegan and are typically more expensive than their synthetic counterparts, which may be vegan.

Pepsin: A digestive enzyme sourced from animal stomachs. Can be used to make cheese and other homogenized foods. Placenta: Also known as afterbirth, the placenta is connected to a mammal fetus through the umbilical cord. Human, cow, pig and other mammal fetuses are nourished in utero with this organ, which is expelled during birth.

Can be found as an ingredient in haircare items and other beauty products. Polypeptide: A polymer chain found in protein molecules that can be derived either from animal collagen (see collagen above) or vegetable oil sources, particularly coconut. Most often used in personal care products, particularly in shampoos and conditioners.

  • Propolis: Also known as bee glue.
  • A naturally produced salivary resin that honeybees use to seal cracks in the hive.
  • Used in supplements, vitamins and some naturopathic medications.
  • Can also be used as a waxing agent for musical instruments and cars, or as an all-natural chewing gum ingredient.
  • Rennet: The lining of ruminant mammal’s stomach.
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Cow rennet is a common ingredient in cheese. Vegetable rennet is available. Retinol: Also known as vitamin A1, the only natural sources of this essential vitamin are animal products such as eggs, dairy, and cod liver oil. Synthetic, vegan-friendly retinol is available and may be an important supplement for vegans as dietary retinol intake is not possible on a vegan diet.

  1. Retinol is also used in some beauty products.
  2. Royal Jelly: A protein-rich nutrient substance secreted by worker honeybees to provide nutrition for the hive’s larvae and queen bee.
  3. Used as a medication in naturopathic settings, but its efficacy has been thoroughly disproven and it can even cause deadly allergic reactions.

Sable: The fur of the sable, a mammal in the marten species. Often used for brushes in both makeup and art. Schmaltz: Chicken fat. This Yiddish word is often used instead of the words “chicken fat” in ingredients lists. Sepia: A pigment that may use squid and other marine animal inks to get its dark brown color.

Found most often in expensive sepia inks. Shellac: Also known as confectioner’s glaze, shellac is an insect-derived resin that provides a shiny coating for candies. Any candy with a uniformly shiny, hard outer shell that looks glossy and polished probably uses shellac. This ingredient is also found in medications.

Silk: The fibrous material used by specific species of insect larvae to make cocoons. Used to create textiles and fibers for use in clothing, accessories, housewares and other products. Faux silk is available. Sponge: A multicellular water-dwelling animal that can be harvested and used for household and bathing sponges.

Look out for labels like “sea sponge” and “all-natural sponge.” Synthetic cellulose sponges and loofahs are a vegan alternative. Squid Ink: The black defensive ink contained in ink sacs in marine cephalopod animals such as squid, cuttlefish, and octopi. Can be used as an ingredient in food, particularly in Italian and some Asian cuisines.

Stearic Acid: A fatty acid derived most commonly from animal fat. Shea butter and other botanical sources can also produce useable stearic acid. Most commonly used for personal care products such as soap, textile manufacturing and, in some cases, plaster casting.

  • Stearic acid can also be found in some fireworks.
  • Suede: A type of leather made from animal hides.
  • Faux suede and leather is available.
  • Suet: A hard animal fat found in the abdomens of sheep and cows.
  • Can be used as a fat for deep frying.
  • Used primary in traditional recipes from the United Kingdom, including haggis and spotted dick.

Tallow: Rendered suet. Can be used as a cooking ingredient or for a variety of other applications, including soapmaking and the production of biodiesel fuel. Vellum: A translucent paper made from animal skin. Most commonly used for high-end book and artmaking, though it has mostly been replaced with more affordable paper, also called vellum, made from botanically-derived ingredients such as cellulose.

  • Vegan alternatives are widely available, but you may want to check when purchasing vellum to make sure it’s vegan.
  • Vitamin B12: A vitamin with no known botanical sources.
  • Used primarily for dietary supplements and multivitamins.
  • Synthetic supplements are available and may be an important dietary supplement for vegans due to the fact that this vitamin is wholly absent from a plant-based diet.

Vitamin D: A class of fat-soluble vitamins vital for health in a number of areas ranging from bone density to mental health. Most D vitamins are available in a synthetic form, and foods supplemented with vitamin D tend to use the synthetic form. Vegans should avoid vitamin D3, which, in its all-natural form, is derived from animals such as fish or mammals.

  1. Wax: A wide-ranging class of substances that can be animal-derived, botanical, or synthetic.
  2. Beeswax, which is made by bees and is not vegan.
  3. It is a common ingredient in all-natural foods, personal care products and other products, including some art supplies.
  4. Soy and other wax alternatives are available.

Whey: A high-protein byproduct of cheesemaking. Anything with “whey” in the name, including whey protein isolate, is a dairy product and therefore not vegan. Wool: Textiles and other fabrics that use fur from sheep, alpacas and other animals. The fur is shaved from the animal while it is living and processed for use in the creation of clothing, housewares and other products.

Is panthenol a drug?

Identification – Summary Panthenol is an ingredient used in skin, hair care, and nutritional products but is not an approved medication. Generic Name Panthenol DrugBank Accession Number DB11204 Background Panthenol is an alcohol derivative of pantothenic acid, a component of the B complex vitamins and an essential component of a normally functioning epithelium.

Panthenol exists as a racemic mixture containing both the dextrorotatory form (dexpanthenol) and the levorotatory form (levopanthenol). While pantothenic acid is optically active, only the dextrorotatory form ( Dexpanthenol ) is biologically active. Dexpanthenol, the active form of panthenol, is enzymatically cleaved to form pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5), which is an essential component of Coenzyme A that acts as a cofactor in many enzymatic reactions that are important for protein metabolism in the epithelium 1,

Due to its good penetration and high local concentrations, dexpanthanol is used in many topical products, such as ointments and lotions for treatment of dermatological conditions to relieve itching or promote healing. Dermatological effects of the topical use of dexpanthenol include increased fibroblast proliferation and accelerated re-epithelialization in wound healing.

Is phenoxyethanol an alcohol?

Summary Phenoxyethanol is an antiseptic used as a hand disinfectant or preservative in medications. Generic Name Phenoxyethanol DrugBank Accession Number DB11304 Background Phenoxyethanol is a colorless liquid with a pleasant odor. It is a glycol ether used as a perfume fixative, insect repellent, antiseptic, solvent, preservative, and also as an anesthetic in fish aquaculture.

  • Phenoxyethanol is an ether alcohol with aromatic properties.
  • It is both naturally found and manufactured synthetically.
  • Demonstrating antimicrobial ability, phenoxyethanol acts as an effective preservative in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics and lubricants 5,
  • Phenoxyethanol (EU), or PE, is the most commonly used globally-approved preservative in personal care formulations.

It is very easy to use in various types of formulations and is chemically stable. Phenoxyethanol is a colorless, clear, oily liquid with a faint aromatic odor at room temperature and a low water solubility and evaporation rate. It is produced by reacting phenol (EU) and ethylene oxide (EU) at a high temperature and pressure.

  • This substance occurs naturally in green tea (EU) 6,
  • According to the European Union Cosmetics Regulation (EC) n.1223/2009, phenoxyethanol is authorized as a preservative in cosmetic formulations at a maximum concentration of 1.0% 8,
  • Phenoxyethanol has been classified as an antimicrobial and preservative by Health Canada 7,

It has also been used in vaccines and shown to inactivate bacteria, and several types of yeast 2, Type Small Molecule Groups Approved Structure Weight Average: 138.166 Monoisotopic: 138.068079562 Chemical Formula C 8 H 10 O 2 Synonyms

  • 1-Hydroxy-2-phenoxyethane
  • 2-Hydroxyethyl phenyl ether
  • 2-phenoxyethanol
  • 2-Phenoxyethyl alcohol
  • beta-Hydroxyethyl phenyl ether
  • Ethylene glycol monophenyl ether
  • Phenoxytol
  • Phenyl cellosolve
  • Phenylmonoglycol ether

External IDs

FEMA NO.4620

Indication Antimicrobial agent used as a preservative in cosmetics 4, 5, 8, Reduce drug development failure rates Build, train, & validate machine-learning models with evidence-based and structured datasets. Build, train, & validate predictive machine-learning models with structured datasets. Associated Therapies

Skin disinfection

Contraindications & Blackbox Warnings Avoid life-threatening adverse drug events Improve clinical decision support with information on contraindications & blackbox warnings, population restrictions, harmful risks, & more. Avoid life-threatening adverse drug events & improve clinical decision support. Pharmacodynamics This substance has broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against bacteria, yeasts, and mold 6, Mechanism of action Phenoxyethanol has antibacterial properties and is effective against strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa even in the presence of 20% serum. It not as effective against Proteus vulgaris, other gram-negative organisms, and gram-positive organisms. Phenoxyethanol has been used as a preservative at a concentration of 1%. A wider spectrum of antimicrobial activity is achieved with preservative mixtures of phenoxyethanol and hydroxybenzoates. Phenoxyethanol may be used as a 2.2% solution or a 2% cream for the treatment of superficial wounds, burns, or abscesses infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In skin infection, derivatives of phenoxyethanol are used in combination with either cyclic acid or zinc undecenoate 7, Absorption Not Available Volume of distribution A pharmacokinetic study of phenoxyethanol was performed using a mass spectrometry model for simultaneous analysis of phenoxyethanol (PE) and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid (PAA), in rat plasma, urine, and 7 different tissues 10, The absolute topical bioavailability of PE was 75.4% and 76.0% for emulsion and lotion, respectively. Conversion of PE to PAA was extensive, with the average AUCPAA-to-AUCPE ratio being 4.4 and 5.3 for emulsion and lotion, respectively. The steady-state tissue-to-plasma PE concentration ratio (Kp) was higher than unity for kidney, spleen, heart, brain, and testis and was lower (0.6) for lung and liver, while the metabolite Kp ratio was higher than unity for kidney, liver, lung, and testis and was lower (0.3) for other tissues 10, Protein binding Not Available Metabolism The fate of phenoxyethanol in rats and humans has been investigated 4, The rate of intestinal absorption was rapid, with 60-70% of the excreted (14)C detected at 3 hours and > 95% of the total 4-day urinary (14)C detected within the first 24 hr. Trace amounts of radioactivity were detected in feces. Four days after dosing, only trace amounts of radioactivity remained in the carcass, primarily in the liver (< 0.2% of the dose), fat and muscle. At the 4 day point, the (14)C concentration in blood was measured to be only 0.001 4, The major metabolite of phenoxyethanol is phenoxyacetic acid 10, Route of elimination The fate of phenoxyethanol in rats and humans has been investigated. More than 90% of an oral dose of 16, 27 or 160 mg/kg body weight of (2-(14)C)phenoxyethanol administered to male Colworth rats by was excreted in the urine within 24 hours of administration. A female rat also excreted about 90% of a dose of 27 mg/kg body weight in the urine within 24 hours. About 2% and 1.3% of the ingested dose was recovered from the exhaled air of female and male rats, respectively 4, Half-life Not Available Clearance Not Available Adverse Effects Improve decision support & research outcomes With structured adverse effects data, including: blackbox warnings, adverse reactions, warning & precautions, & incidence rates. Improve decision support & research outcomes with our structured adverse effects data.

  • Toxicity LC50 oral, rat; 1980 mg/kg MSDS,
  • LD50 Rabbit dermal 2250 mg/kg 4,2-Phenoxyethanol (PhE) has been shown to induce hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, and hemolysis at dosages ≥ 400 mg/kg/day in subchronic and chronic studies in multiple species 3,
  • The major hazards encountered in the use and handling of 2-phenoxyethanol stem from its toxicologic properties.

Toxic by all routes (inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact), exposure to this very faintly aromatic, colorless, oily liquid may occur from its use as a fixative for cosmetics, perfumes, and soaps; as a bactericide and insect repellant; as a solvent for cellulose acetate,dyes, stamp pad, ball point, and specialty inks; as a chemical intermediate for carboxylic acid esters (eg, acrylate, maleate) and polymers (eg, formaldehyde, melamine); and as a preservative for human specimens used for dissection and demonstrations in anatomical studies.

Effects resulting from exposure to this substance can include eye irritation, headache, tremors, and central nervous system depression. If contact with the eyes occurs, irrigate exposed eyes with copious amounts of tepid water for at least 15 minutes, and wash exposed skin thoroughly with soap and water.2-Phenoxyethanol must be preheated before ignition can occur 7,

Pathways Not Available Pharmacogenomic Effects/ADRs Not Available Drug Interactions This information should not be interpreted without the help of a healthcare provider. If you believe you are experiencing an interaction, contact a healthcare provider immediately.

  • Approved
  • Vet approved
  • Nutraceutical
  • Illicit
  • Withdrawn
  • Investigational
  • Experimental
  • All Drugs
Drug Interaction
Integrate drug-drug interactions in your software
Baclofen Baclofen may increase the central nervous system depressant (CNS depressant) activities of Phenoxyethanol.
Clobazam The risk or severity of sedation, somnolence, and CNS depression can be increased when Clobazam is combined with Phenoxyethanol.
Cyclobenzaprine The risk or severity of CNS depression can be increased when Cyclobenzaprine is combined with Phenoxyethanol.
Daridorexant The risk or severity of CNS depression can be increased when Phenoxyethanol is combined with Daridorexant.
Fluoxetine Phenoxyethanol may increase the central nervous system depressant (CNS depressant) activities of Fluoxetine.
Haloperidol The risk or severity of CNS depression can be increased when Haloperidol is combined with Phenoxyethanol.
Lasmiditan The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Lasmiditan is combined with Phenoxyethanol.
Metoclopramide The risk or severity of sedation can be increased when Metoclopramide is combined with Phenoxyethanol.
Midazolam The risk or severity of sedation and CNS depression can be increased when Midazolam is combined with Phenoxyethanol.
Oliceridine The risk or severity of hypotension, sedation, death, somnolence, and respiratory depression can be increased when Phenoxyethanol is combined with Oliceridine.

Food Interactions No interactions found. Drug product information from 10+ global regions Our datasets provide approved product information including: dosage, form, labeller, route of administration, and marketing period. Access drug product information from over 10 global regions. Over the Counter Products

Name Dosage Strength Route Labeller Marketing Start Marketing End Region Image
DISINFECT Wet WIPES Cloth 1 mg/1 Topical Jiangsu Xiaolikang Medical Technology Co., Ltd. 2020-03-30 Not applicable
Grime Eater Lotion Soap 2.5% Soap 2.5 % Topical Grime Eater Products Ltd. 1988-12-31 2005-06-17
Lanohex Nettoyeur Pour LA Peau 1.7% Liquid 1.7 % Topical Rougier Pharma Division Of Ratiopharm Inc 1960-12-31 2003-09-22
Lanohex Shp 1.7% Shampoo 1.7 % Topical Rougier Pharma Division Of Ratiopharm Inc 1960-12-31 2000-09-07
Vaxol Puri Liquid 1.5 mg/100mL Topical OPENKOREA CO., Ltd 2020-12-17 Not applicable

Mixture Products

Name Ingredients Dosage Route Labeller Marketing Start Marketing End Region Image
75% Alcohol Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.1938 g/51) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.0969 g/51) + Benzethonium chloride (0.0646 g/51) + Bronopol (0.0969 g/51) + Ethanol (242.25 g/51) Cloth Topical Baijieyuan Biotechnology (Shandong) Co., Ltd. 2020-06-10 2020-06-16
Acropole Bleu Phenoxyethanol (.45 %) + Chloroxylenol (.15 %) Jelly Topical Groupe Parall Inc 1997-10-01 2001-07-23
Aiweier Alcohol Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.1938 g/201) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.0969 g/201) + Benzethonium chloride (0.0646 g/201) + Bronopol (0.0969 g/201) + Ethanol (242.25 g/201) Cloth Topical Baijieyuan Biotechnology (Shandong) Co., Ltd. 2020-06-10 Not applicable
Aiweier Disinfecttant Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.18 g/1001) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.09 g/1001) + Benzethonium chloride (0.06 g/1001) + Bronopol (0.09 g/1001) + Ethanol (225 g/1001) Cloth Topical Baijieyuan Biotechnology (Shandong) Co., Ltd. 2020-06-10 Not applicable
Aiweier Disinfecttant Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.081 g/601) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.0405 g/601) + Benzethonium chloride (0.027 g/601) + Bronopol (0.0405 g/601) + Ethanol (101.25 g/601) Cloth Topical Baijieyuan Biotechnology (Shandong) Co., Ltd. 2020-06-10 Not applicable
Alcohol disinfectant wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.5 g/501) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.5 g/501) + Ethanol (160 mL/501) + Methylisothiazolinone (0.5 g/501) + Propylene glycol (0.5 g/501) Cloth Topical Zhejiang Huanghua Biological Technology Co., Ltd 2020-11-26 Not applicable
Alcohol disinfectant wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.5 g/501) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.5 g/501) + Ethanol (160 mL/501) + Methylisothiazolinone (0.5 g/501) + Propylene glycol (0.5 g/501) Cloth Extracorporeal Zhejiang Huanghua Biological Technology Co., Ltd 2020-08-10 Not applicable
Alcohol disinfectant wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.05561375 g/101) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.309375 g/101) + Ethanol (25.3125 mL/101) + Methylisothiazolinone (0.73125 mg/101) + Propylene glycol (0.2475 g/101) Cloth Extracorporeal Zhejiang Huanghua Biological Technology Co., Ltd 2020-11-26 Not applicable
Alcohol disinfectant wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.27806875 g/501) + Benzalkonium chloride (1.715625 g/501) + Ethanol (126.5625 mL/501) + Methylisothiazolinone (3.65625 mg/501) + Propylene glycol (1.2375 g/501) Cloth Extracorporeal Zhejiang Huanghua Biological Technology Co., Ltd 2020-11-26 Not applicable
Alcohol disinfectant wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.05561375 g/101) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.309375 g/101) + Ethanol (25.3125 mL/101) + Methylisothiazolinone (0.73125 mg/101) + Propylene glycol (0.2475 g/101) Cloth Extracorporeal Zhejiang Huanghua Biological Technology Co., Ltd 2020-05-21 Not applicable

Unapproved/Other Products

Name Ingredients Dosage Route Labeller Marketing Start Marketing End Region Image
DISINFECT Wet WIPES Phenoxyethanol (1 mg/1) Cloth Topical Jiangsu Xiaolikang Medical Technology Co., Ltd. 2020-03-30 Not applicable
Disinfectant Cleaning Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.6 g/1601) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.12 g/1601) + Ethylhexylglycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Glycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Propylene glycol (0.12 g/1601) Cloth Extracorporeal Reynard (Ningbo) Biotechnology Co., Ltd. 2020-04-17 2020-05-29
Disinfectant Cleaning Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.6 g/1601) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.12 g/1601) + Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (0.24 g/1601) + Ethylhexylglycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Glycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Propylene glycol (0.12 g/1601) Cloth Extracorporeal Reynard (Ningbo) Biotechnology Co., Ltd. 2020-06-12 Not applicable
Disinfectant Cleaning Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.6 g/1601) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.12 g/1601) + Ethylhexylglycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Glycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Propylene glycol (0.12 g/1601) Cloth Extracorporeal Reynard (Ningbo) Biotechnology Co., Ltd. 2020-04-17 2020-05-29
Disinfecting Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.6 g/1601) + Benzalkonium chloride (0.12 g/1601) + Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (0.24 g/1601) + Ethylhexylglycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Glycerin (0.12 g/1601) + Propylene glycol (0.12 g/1601) Cloth Extracorporeal Reynard (Ningbo) Biotechnology Co., Ltd. 2020-04-17 Not applicable
Hand Sanitizer Phenoxyethanol (0.3 g/100mL) + Benzyl alcohol (0.3 g/100mL) + Ethanol (62 mL/100mL) Gel Topical Larry (Xiamen)Hi-Tech Co.,Ltd. 2020-04-01 Not applicable
HydroGold 9 Phenoxyethanol (0.5 mg/100mg) + Acetyl hexapeptide-3 (0.01 mg/100mg) + Adenosine (0.04 mg/100mg) + Allantoin (0.2 mg/100mg) + Sodium benzoate (0.5 mg/100mg) + Butylene glycol (2 mg/100mg) + Castor oil (0.4 mg/100mg) + Dimethicone (0.01 mg/100mg) + Glycerin (20 mg/100mg) + Gold (0.0001 mg/100mg) + Nicotinamide (2 mg/100mg) + Potassium chloride (0.01 mg/100mg) + Titanium dioxide (0.43 mg/100mg) + Xanthan gum (0.5 mg/100mg) Patch Topical Bhmbg Global Branding Inc. 2018-03-09 2019-12-31
Vaxol Puri Phenoxyethanol (1.5 mg/100mL) Liquid Topical OPENKOREA CO., Ltd 2020-12-17 Not applicable
Wet Wipes Phenoxyethanol (0.3 g/100g) + Benzalkonium (0.06 g/100g) + Chlorphenesin (0.1 g/100g) + Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (0.4 g/100g) + Ethanol (10 g/100g) Cloth Topical Sourcery Ltd 2020-06-15 Not applicable

Drug Categories Chemical Taxonomy Provided by Classyfire Description This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as phenol ethers. These are aromatic compounds containing an ether group substituted with a benzene ring. Kingdom Organic compounds Super Class Benzenoids Class Phenol ethers Sub Class Not Available Direct Parent Phenol ethers Alternative Parents Phenoxy compounds / Alkyl aryl ethers / Primary alcohols / Hydrocarbon derivatives Substituents Alcohol / Alkyl aryl ether / Aromatic homomonocyclic compound / Ether / Hydrocarbon derivative / Monocyclic benzene moiety / Organic oxygen compound / Organooxygen compound / Phenol ether / Phenoxy compound Molecular Framework Aromatic homomonocyclic compounds External Descriptors aromatic ether, primary alcohol, hydroxyether ( CHEBI:64275 ) Affected organisms

Humans and other mammals

UNII HIE492ZZ3T CAS number 122-99-6 InChI Key QCDWFXQBSFUVSP-UHFFFAOYSA-N InChI InChI=1S/C8H10O2/c9-6-7-10-8-4-2-1-3-5-8/h1-5,9H,6-7H2 IUPAC Name 2-phenoxyethan-1-ol SMILES General References

  1. Morton WE: Occupational phenoxyethanol neurotoxicity: a report of three cases. J Occup Med.1990 Jan;32(1):42-5.
  2. Lowe I, Southern J: The antimicrobial activity of phenoxyethanol in vaccines. Lett Appl Microbiol.1994 Feb;18(2):115-6.
  3. Troutman JA, Rick DL, Stuard SB, Fisher J, Bartels MJ: Development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol.2015 Nov;73(2):530-43. doi: 10.1016/j.yrtph.2015.07.012. Epub 2015 Jul 16.
  4. Phenoxyethanol
  5. Phenoxyethanol – Brumer
  6. Phenoxyethanol: A Globally-Approved Preservative
  7. Health Canada: Phenoxyethanol
  8. Opinion on Phenoxyethanol – EU Law and Publications
  9. pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment
  10. Simultaneous determination of phenoxyethanol and its major metabolite, phenoxyacetic acid, in rat biological matrices by LC–MS/MS with polarity switching: Application to ADME studies

External Links Human Metabolome Database HMDB0041607 PubChem Compound 31236 PubChem Substance 347827964 ChemSpider 13848467 RxNav 89552 ChEBI 64275 ChEMBL CHEMBL1229846 ZINC ZINC000001577061 PDBe Ligand 268 Wikipedia Phenoxyethanol PDB Entries 2rbr MSDS Clinical Trials

Phase Status Purpose Conditions Count

Manufacturers Not Available Packagers Not Available Dosage Forms

Form Route Strength
Jelly Topical
Liquid Topical
Cloth Topical 1 mg/1
Cloth Topical
Cloth Extracorporeal
Dressing Topical
Soap Topical 2.5 %
Patch Topical
Liquid Topical 1.7 %
Shampoo Topical 1.7 %
Spray Topical
Gel Topical
Solution Topical
Liquid Topical 1.5 mg/100mL
Swab Topical

Prices Not Available Patents Not Available State Liquid Experimental Properties

Property Value Source
melting point (°C) 13 MSDS
boiling point (°C) 245 MSDS
water solubility 24g/L at 20°C MSDS

Predicted Properties

Property Value Source
Water Solubility 24.1 mg/mL ALOGPS
logP 1.22 ALOGPS
logP 1.13 Chemaxon
logS -0.76 ALOGPS
pKa (Strongest Acidic) 15.1 Chemaxon
pKa (Strongest Basic) -2.8 Chemaxon
Physiological Charge Chemaxon
Hydrogen Acceptor Count 2 Chemaxon
Hydrogen Donor Count 1 Chemaxon
Polar Surface Area 29.46 Å 2 Chemaxon
Rotatable Bond Count 3 Chemaxon
Refractivity 38.81 m 3 ·mol -1 Chemaxon
Polarizability 14.91 Å 3 Chemaxon
Number of Rings 1 Chemaxon
Bioavailability 1 Chemaxon
Rule of Five Yes Chemaxon
Ghose Filter No Chemaxon
Veber’s Rule Yes Chemaxon
MDDR-like Rule No Chemaxon

Predicted ADMET Features Not Available Mass Spec (NIST) Not Available Spectra

Spectrum Spectrum Type Splash Key
Predicted GC-MS Spectrum – GC-MS Predicted GC-MS Not Available
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9100000000-b40ca28428e0018311ea
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9100000000-f8c06faa8eb8d23a95c1
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9100000000-7b2a4d4d9b09c7b78741
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9100000000-9bb41b75d1ad646b88f0
GC-MS Spectrum – CI-B GC-MS splash10-000i-0900000000-9421e4830e44b3388570
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9000000000-f53c3891b4914dd833e8
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9200000000-b5db9ef1d198ca188c7c
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9100000000-ab2d6abdcb42c8020070
GC-MS Spectrum – EI-B GC-MS splash10-0006-9000000000-480278f55ce8ffc42edb
Mass Spectrum (Electron Ionization) MS splash10-0006-9100000000-9c2de92b427cc8e30262
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Positive (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 10V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 20V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum – 40V, Negative (Annotated) Predicted LC-MS/MS Not Available
1H NMR Spectrum 1D NMR Not Applicable
13C NMR Spectrum 1D NMR Not Applicable

Drug created at December 03, 2015 16:52 / Updated at January 08, 2021 01:05

Is panthenol safe for skin?

Panthenol comes from vitamin B5 and is a moisturizing compound. It can come from either animal or plant sources. Panthenol can be found in the ingredients in hair conditioners or body wash. Panthenol is used commonly in skincare and cosmetic products. ‌ Panthenol comes from pantothenic acid.

  • These compounds naturally help your skin and hair look and feel better.
  • By using products with panthenol in them your hair might look shinier and feel fuller.
  • This is due to the way panthenol reacts to the surface of your skin.
  • It moisturizes and makes your skin feel soft and smooth.
  • A vitamin B5 supplement might help with your metabolism or cholesterol levels.

You can try eating foods with vitamin B5 before you turn to a panthenol supplement. Pantothenic acid occurs naturally in many types of food. You may also be eating food that it’s been added to. Foods that usually contain vitamin B5 include:

Meats like beef, poultry, and seafoodMilk and eggs Vegetables like avocados, broccoli, mushrooms, and potatoes Whole grains like whole-wheat bread and brown ricePeanuts, sunflower seeds, and chickpeas

A vitamin B5 deficiency is very rare. Most people get enough in their diet. There is a rare hereditary disorder called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. In rare cases of a deficiency, you may feel the following symptoms:

Numbness and burning in your hands and feetExtreme tirednessIrritabilityFeeling restlessTrouble sleeping Headaches Stomach painDiarrheaNausea and vomitingLoss of appetite

‌ If you are experiencing these symptoms you should talk to your doctor immediately. They can determine if you have a deficiency and prescribe the proper treatment. Panthenol works well on your skin because vitamin B5 is extracted with ethanol or benzyl alcohol to dissolve into your skin.

  • This type of topical treatment includes other vitamins and amino acids that are good for your skin.
  • When you put panthenol on your skin it converts into vitamin B5.
  • The vitamin is then absorbed into your skin.
  • You are most likely to find panthenol as an ingredient in products as an oil (D-Panthenol) or a creamy white powder (DL-Panthenol).

You can find panthenol in many common self-care and cosmetic products. Hair products. If you are looking for a moisturizing and nourishing hair product, you’ll find many shampoo and conditioners with panthenol. It is also in many styling gels, hair mousses, hair sprays, and detanglers.

  • Skincare products.
  • You can find many products with panthenol for your self-care and skin care routine.
  • These include facial moisturizers, face masks, serums, facial cleansers, toners, eye creams, sunscreens, makeup removers, bubble baths, and shaving cream products.
  • Cosmetic products.
  • When it comes to your makeup you’ll find panthenol in items you use every day.

This includes some mascaras, foundations, brow liners, eyeliners, lipsticks, bronzers, highlighters, and setting powders or sprays. Baby products. Because panthenol is safe for skin, you can even find some baby products with it. These include baby shampoo, lotion, soap, and sunscreen.

  • Be sure to monitor your baby’s skin to determine if certain products give them skin rashes or not.
  • There aren’t many significant risks of using panthenol.
  • The FDA considers panthenol to be a nutrient or dietary supplement that’s safe.
  • Panthenol is a vitamin that can be used in topical treatments or taken as a supplement.

The FDA has also said that it’s safe when used in your common makeup or personal care products. Studies have shown that there is a very low risk of getting irritated skin if you use panthenol. This could be due to the relatively low levels found in your everyday products.

  1. ‌ Use topical creams with 1% to 5% of panthenol concentrations in them to see better results for your skin.
  2. Products with these concentrations are proven to improve hydration and absorption in your skin.
  3. Your body requires vitamin B5.
  4. Taking panthenol as a supplement if you don’t get enough in your diet is beneficial.

Vitamin B5 can help regulate your metabolism. Talk to your doctor before making any major changes to your diet or adding a vitamin B5 supplement.

Is panthenol good for tattoos?

Description – New look, same great lotion! This light lotion goes on evenly and absorbs quickly, leaving your skin feeling refreshed, never greasy. The itch-relief ingredient panthenol makes this lotion your best friend during the scabbing part of the healing process. It’s also a go-to for healed tattoos to keep skin moisturized and colors vibrant. Quick Facts

For healing and healed tattoos Relieves itching Helps speed healing Petroleum and lanolin-free Fragrance and dye-free Free of zinc oxide and mineral oil

Tattoo Goo® Tattoo Care Lotion contains panthenol (“lab speak” for vitamin B5), which is known to promote healing and reduce skin irritation — particularly the itching that comes with a new tattoo (you’re welcome). The rich olive oil formula penetrates skin with deep moisture to keep tattoos vibrant. And P.S. — it’s not just for tattoos. Apply to any skin that is dry, itchy or irritated!

Is panthenol oil or water based?

As a raw material, two forms of panthenol can be incorporated in personal care product formulas: D-panthenol is a viscous oil and DL-panthenol comes in the form of a white, crystalline powder.

Why is there alcohol in moisturizer?

A Final Word on Alcohol and Skin-Care Products – Alcohol can be a useful addition to help ingredients penetrate the skin, preserve the product, and make it feel lightweight when applied, says Frieling. In smaller amounts, it’s unlikely to be harmful, but be especially careful if you have sensitive, dry, or eczema-prone skin.

How much alcohol is in cetearyl alcohol?

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION – Cetearyl alcohol comes as white, waxy, solid granules or flakes with no odour. It is a co-emulsifier and stabiliser used in oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. It is made up of a mixture of fatty alcohols from plant origin (palm kernel), consisting mainly of cetyl and stearyl alcohols and is classified as a fatty alcohol.

  • Cetearyl Alcohol Standard Version This product is 100% plant based Cetearyl Alcohol consisting of approximately 30% C16 alcohols and 70% C18 alcohols.
  • This version is not currently listed on our COSMOS approved ACS Schedule for COSMOS approved non organic ingredients, however, the specs are similar to the COSMOS approved version.

It is non GMO, not tested on animals and suitable for Vegans. The country of origin is India. Cetearyl Alcohol COSMOS Approved Version This Cetearyl Alcohol is listed on our COSMOS approved ACS Schedule for non organic ingredients, which means it is approved for use in COSMOS certified products.

  • It consists of a minimum of 60% C18 alcohols and a minimum of 23% C16 alcohols.
  • The country of origin is India.
  • It is non gmo and 100% plant based Cetearyl Alcohol.
  • Many different versions are also animal sourced even when declared as vegetable origin.
  • We have undertaken extensive work to ensure that ours are of 100% plant origin.

Saponification Value (mgKOH/g): 1.2 maximum Acid Value (mgKOH/g): 0.1 maximum. Chain Length Distribution C14:0 and lower: 5 % maximum C16:0: 25 – 35 % C18:0: 65 – 75 % C20:0 and higher: 2 % maximum According to the Cosmetic Ingredient Database (Cosing), the functions of Cetearyl Alcohol are: Emollient, Emulsifying, Emulsion Stabilising, Foam Boosting, Opacifying, Surfactant, Viscosity Controlling To view more information, visit the Cosing Database here,

Is panthenol B5 vegan?

Oz. Vegan & Cruelty-free, rich moisturizing cream, moisturizing. Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.

Does panthenol dissolve in oil?

Panthenol is water soluble so it must be dissolved in water and not in oil. Therefore suitable in formulas with water such as shampoo, conditioner, lotion and serums.

How do you dissolve panthenol?

Panthenol Provitamin B5 Cosmetic Active Powder

Panthenol Provitamin B5 Cosmetic Active Powder Appearance: White powder, odorless, soluble in water.Add to the aqueous phase hot or cold or dissolve it in a little water before incorporating it into your product.Recommended rate: 1 to 2%Uses: Hair product, skin care, shower gel, cream and lotion.

Panthenol also called Vitamin B5, is a very effective active and widely used in cosmetics. Panthenol improves hydration, reduces itching and inflammation of the skin. It accelerates and improves the healing of epidermal wounds. It is often used in sunburn treatment products.

Once in the body, Provitamin B5 turns into vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), which has a key role in repairing cells and tissues. This vitamin actively participates in the formation and regeneration of the skin and hair. Panthenol DL Provitamine B5 powder is very famous for hair and skin care thanks to its fortifying, repairing and hydrating action.

Provitamin B5 stimulates skin cells while soothing it. The moisturizing properties of Provitamin B5 help reduce water loss by maintaining the elasticity of the skin.For hair care, Provitamin B5 Panthenol is also recognized for its strengthening and beautifying action, making it brighter and easier to comb.

Is panthenol good or bad for you?

Is Panthenol in skincare a harmful ingredient? Today’s spot light ingredient is Panthenol. Never heard of it? Have you head of “Pantene Pro-V”? Yes? Well, Panthenol is the Pro-V💪 Pro-V is Pro-Vitamin B5 oryep, panthenol. ProV is a moisturizer and humectant (meaning it attracts and retains moisture).

When skin care products containing panthenol penetrate the skin, the provitamin is converted to Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) and its this vitamin which improves hydration, reduces itching and inflammation of the skin and accelerates epidermal wounds’ rate of healing. That means in short, reducing the redness & swelling of breakouts and in the longer term reducing the severity of any scaring.

It doesn’t stop there either. As a moisturising ingredient, it stabilises the skin’s barrier function, reducing the amount of water lost through the skin. This, in turn, improves skin texture and elasticity which helps reduce the severity of acne scaring.

  1. But wait! A study from 2006 tested pantothenic acid on 25 women with oily skin and found that it significantly reduced their sebum levels.
  2. Wow, but there’s more – a 2014 study showed suppressed growth of pathogenic skin bacteria using panthenol.
  3. Two big mechanisms for acne breakouts.
  4. I’ve heard enough, slather me up!” you shout.

Hold your horses sunshine, nothings without negatives. Prolonged and continuous use of products containing high quantities of Panthenol may ironically, turn out to be detrimental to skin health. For example, cases of skin rash and irritation have been reported among massive users.

As always YMMV, try products with panthenol in, keep a diary and see how you go. Sources: The effects of a daily facial lotion containing vitamins B3 and E and provitamin B5 on the facial skin of Indian women: a randomized, double-blind trial. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol.2010;76(1):20-6. Jerajani HR, Mizoguchi H, Li J, Whittenbarger DJ, Marmor MJ.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20061726 : Is Panthenol in skincare a harmful ingredient?

Is panthenol plant based?

Panthenol is a plant-derived provitamin of B5 and can be found in many personal care products including cosmetics or shampoos. This ingredient has many beneficial uses to improve skin appearance because of its humectant properties. It helps soothe oxidative stress like redness, lines, and callouses.

  • D-Panthenol is considered a sustainable and eco-friendly product because it is derived from pantothenic acid (known as vitamin B5).
  • The structure of panthenol has two mirrored sides that do not exactly duplicate one another.
  • Each side possesses a unique biology and chemistry, which developers can amplify or minimize depending on their desired use.

The molecule is critical for normal epithelial activity and is a part of coenzyme A. It is odorless, colorless, bitter, extremely viscous, and is transparent when kept at room temperature. The molecule is soluble in water or alcohol, less so in chloroform and propylene glycol, and it is only slightly soluble in glycerin.

  • The molecule possesses humectant-like moisturizing properties, while retaining the viscosity to spread evenly across hair or skin.
  • It attracts moisture in the air and binds itself to the water molecules.
  • Thus, it protects the skin and hair from dehydration and helps hair avoid tangles or knots.
  • Panthenol helps hydrate skin and can speed up epidermal wound healing by strengthening the skin cells.

By means of nutrient infusion, panthenol can boost the skin’s ability to fight off toxins in the environment. The information presented here was acquired by UL from the producer of the product or material or original information provider. However, UL assumes no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the information contained on this website and strongly encourages that upon final product or material selection information is validated with the manufacturer.

Is panthenol B5 vegan?

Oz. Vegan & Cruelty-free, rich moisturizing cream, moisturizing. Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.

Can panthenol be vegan?

There’s a lot of alarmist information out there that can really scare vegans – However, it’s important to apply common sense to avoid getting scared by false information. The modern industrial food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries are motivated by profit, and the fact is that livestock management, even in the horrific conditions they experience in the factory farming industry, is not as cost-effective as using plant-based alternatives or synthesizing chemical compounds in a lab.

In many cases (but not all!), manufacturers will choose to use the botanical or synthetic option. This is not to say that you shouldn’t be vigilant; many animal-derived ingredients sneak into seemingly vegan products, and it’s important to educate yourself with accurate information. When in doubt, do your research, stick with trusted brands, and be sure to look out for product labels with symbols and fine print certifying a product as vegan.

You may see some of the ingredients on this list that are also on the ingredients list of a product certified as vegan, In those cases, you can research the certifying organization for reassurance that the form of the potentially animal-derived ingredient on the list is actually either synthetic or derived from plants.

  1. This list covers some of the most common animal-derived ingredients and some more obscure or misleadingly labeled ingredients that vegans should either avoid entirely or carefully research to determine the exact origin.
  2. Aioli: An emulsified sauce or condiment frequently made with egg yolks.
  3. In some cases, the sauce may be a mix of olive oil and garlic, which is vegan.

Albumen: Protein derived from egg whites and occasionally from blood. Most often used in foods. Alcohols: Industrial alcohols such as aliphatic alcohol, fatty alcohols, cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, lauryl alcohol, oleyl alcohol etc. Though they can be derived from animal sources, most industrial alcohols are synthesized through the fermentation and processing of plants such as wheat, corn, and olives.

Fatty alcohols are usually sourced from vegetable oils, including coconut and canola. Most often used in beauty and personal care products as an emulsifier, foaming agent, or surfactant. See LANOLIN for exception. Angora: A type of wool derived from rabbit fur. Can be spun into yarn to create knit fabrics.

Animal Hormones: Adrenaline, thyroid hormone T4, cortisol/hydrocortisone, and progesterone are all naturally occurring hormones found in many animals, including humans and livestock animals. These hormones are often available in synthetic form and may also be derived from plants.

  1. Used for medical applications, including over-the-counter and prescription drugs.
  2. Ambergris: A traditional perfume scent derived from the digestive system of the sperm whale.
  3. Still used in some high-end perfumes, but the ingredient is very expensive and therefore not common.
  4. Synthetic versions have been developed as well.

Products made and sold in the USA are legally barred from including this and other ingredients sourced from marine mammals, but products made in other countries may include this ingredient. Amylase: An enzyme found in animal and human saliva. Can be used for medical and personal care products.

  1. Aspic: A gelatin-based dish that uses stock made from fish, cow, pig, or chicken bones to create a jelly-like substance in which food is held together for presentation.
  2. Bone Ash: A white powdered substance made from the refined ash of burned animal bones.
  3. Used as a food additive and as an anticaking agent for granulated foods such as salt and dried herbs or spices.

Also known as bone phosphate of lime. Possibly also referred to as calcium phosphate or tribasic calcium phosphate, but these can also be synthetic. Boneblack/Bone Charcoal: A black pigment extracted from burned animal bones. Often used for black tattoo inks.

  • Vegan tattoo ink is available.
  • Bone Char/Natural Carbon: Charcoal made from animal bones used in the processing and filtration of a variety of foods and beverages, including refined white sugar and some liquors.
  • Bone Meal: A traditional organic fertilizer made from crushed animal bones.
  • Because it is a source of calcium, it may be used in calcium supplements and multivitamins.

Calcium Silicate: A chemical compound used in a wide range of industrial practices, including the manufacturing of food and plant fertilizers. May be made from ingredients derived from animal bones. Carmine: Also known as carmine cochineal, carminic acid, or Natural Red #4, carmine is a red dye made from insect shells.

  • Found in some red, orange, purple or pink candy, juices, red-dyed pasta, wine and candles among other products.
  • Cashmere: A type of wool prized for its softness.
  • Derived from the cashmere goat.
  • Used for high-end clothing, accessories, and housewares.
  • Castoreum: A natural secretion from beaver and muskrat scent glands located near the base of the animal’s tail.

Though once used as a flavoring and scent agent, it is rarely found in mass-produced commercial products though it may be used in specialty perfumes. NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH castor oil, a completely plant-based oil made from castor beans. Castor oil is vegan and is a widely used substitute for castoreum.

  1. Chitosan: A chemical compound derived from the shells of shellfish such as crabs and shrimp and is used in a variety of different industrial contexts.
  2. It can be used as a pesticide for fruits and vegetables such as bananas and as a preservative in winemaking.
  3. Civet Absolute: A perfuming and flavoring agent made from the musk of the civet cat.

Civet cats are also used to create civet coffee ; the animal first ingests the coffee beans, then excretes them. The musk transfer from excretion is considered a flavoring agent for the coffee. Cod Liver Oil: A fatty oil extracted from the livers of codfish.

Often used in dietary supplements or sold on its own as a supplement for essential fatty acids (EFA). Collagen: A protein found in skin, cartilage, bone, and other animal bodily tissues. Found in many different food products that contain gelatin (see below) and in a variety of different beauty products.

Also used as a dietary supplement for bone health. Cysteine: Also known as L-cysteine, this amino acid is used in various manufacturing processes, including the production of commercial bread and dough products, and is sourced primarily from bird feathers and human hair.

  • Can also be found in cigarettes.
  • Synthetic versions are also available, but there is a large market for L-cysteine derived from human hair.
  • Disodium Isonate: A food additive that can be derived from animal sources or plants.
  • Down: A fine, delicate feather produced as an insulating base feather layer in birds.

Used as a filling for pillows, blankets, comforters, jackets, vests and other warm garments and bedding items. Elastin: An animal-derived ingredient that comes from connective tissues. Often combined with collagen in beauty products. Synthetic alternatives may be available.

Faux Pearl: An iridescent ingredient created by crushing pearly seashells. Used in makeup to create a shimmery effect. Fish Scales: A common ingredient in makeup with shimmery or iridescent qualities. Scales are removed from fish and ground into powder to be mixed in with makeup such as lipstick or eyeshadow.

Vegan makeup uses alternative ingredients such as minerals. Gelatin: A coagulant and food thickener derived from animal bones, skin and other parts containing collagen. Gelatin is used to thicken and solidify a wide range of foods, including gummy bears, fruit-flavored jello, and marshmallows.

Ghee: Clarified butter. Created by heating butter and straining the solids. This dairy product is often used in Indian and other Southeast Asian cooking traditions. Glycerides: A class of chemical compounds formed through the use of fatty acids. Monoglycerides and diglycerides used in commercially prepared food and personal care products may be made from fatty acids derived from animal sources.

Plant-derived glycerides are also in use, but the distinction may not be made clear on product labels. Glycerol: Also known as glycerine or glycerin, this colorless, odorless liquid is used as a sweetener in food products and can also be found in personal care products such as soap.

There are some pharmaceutical applications as well. Glycerol is derived from both animal and plant sources, and while it is possible to create synthetic glycerol, it’s most commonly used in its natural form. Products containing glycerol that don’t specify whether they’re vegan are best avoided. Guanine: Also known as pearl essence when used in personal care and beauty products.

Derived from various animal sources, including bird excrement. Horseradish: A spicy paste made from the horseradish, a type of radish. Does not contain any horse, but when mixed with other ingredients such as mayonnaise, it may contain animal products.

  1. India Ink: A common black ink used in painting and calligraphy that often uses non-vegan ingredients like ivory black and shellac.
  2. Isinglass: A gelatin derived from fish.
  3. It’s commonly used to clarify beer, wine and other alcoholic beverages.
  4. Beers from the United Kingdom tend to be filtered with isinglass.

Ivory Black: A black pigment made from charred animal bones. Used to create black inks. Keratin: A fibrous protein derived from animal hair, bones, hooves, nails, claws, shells, and beaks. Used in haircare and other beauty products. Krab: Also known as crab sticks, imitation crab meat or krab sticks.

This is a crabmeat substitute that uses both vegetable starch and pulverized fish meat to create what some believe is a vegetarian alternative to crab. Lactic Acid: A naturally occurring acid that is found in animal muscles and dairy products. Can be used as a preservative or flavoring agent for foods such as pickles and sour candy.

Lactose: A sugar naturally derived from milk. Can be used as a flavoring agent in processed foods. Lanolin: A waxy secretion that is produced by wooly mammals like sheep. Commonly used in beauty products and also used as a source of dietary vitamin D for some vitamin-D-fortified beverages and foods.

Lard: Pig fat. Often used as an ingredient or flavoring agent in foods such as baked goods or potato chips. May be included in refried beans and other seemingly vegan foods. Leather: The tanned hides (skins) of various animals, including ostrich, alligator, snake, stingray, eel, cow, sheep and others. Used for clothing, accessories and some types of tools and industrial equipment.

May be dyed bright colors. Vegan alternatives are available. Lecithin: An emulsifier and hydrophobic repellant used to homogenize food mixtures and create nonstick coatings. Derived from several animal-based sources but also frequently extracted from plant sources as well.

Soy lecithin is a particularly common ingredient and is more widely used than animal-derived lecithin. Marabou: A type of feather taken from the marabou stork. Mink Oil: An oily substance created through the rendering of mink fat that results from the fur industry. Used for a variety of personal care and cosmetic applications, including as a shoe polish and as an ingredient in some medications.

Musk: A glandular secretion sourced from a variety of animals, including deer and oxen. Used in colognes, perfumes and some food products. Synthetic alternatives are available. Natural Flavor/Color: A catchall term for organically derived flavoring ingredients included in proportions that are not legally required to be disclosed in specific.

  1. This may include animal-derived substances such as broth or cheese.
  2. If in doubt, look into what specific ingredients are included in the product, look for vegan certification, or choose a different product.
  3. Nondairy: Though the word implies an absence of dairy products, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) allows this label on foods that include a very small proportion of dairy ingredients.

Do not assume that a product labeled as “nondairy” is vegan; read the ingredients list and other disclosures. Oil Pastels: An artistic medium that’s often made through a combination of pigments and animal fat. Vegan options may be available. Omega-3 Fatty Acid: An essential fatty acid that’s an important building block of health and wellness.

Often derived from oily fish such as anchovies, salmon, and cod. Botanical sources such as avocadoes and nuts are abundant. Only fatty, oily foods contain omega-3 fatty acids; foods such as orange juice that is advertised as containing omega-3 are fortified with what may be animal-derived substances. Oxgall/Ox Bile: A digestive fluid sourced from cows.

Used as a wetting agent for artistic media and, rarely, beauty products. Watercolor paints in particular tend to use oxgall as an ingredient, though vegan options are available. Panthenol: An alcohol form of vitamin B sourced from both plants and animals.

  1. Commonly used in beauty products and topical medical ointments for moisturizing and skin-penetrating properties.
  2. Products containing panthenol that don’t specify whether they’re vegan are best avoided.
  3. Parchment: A type of paper made using animal skin.
  4. Mostly out of use now, animal-derived parchment is often seen in antique books and documents.

Modern parchment paper is now primarily made from botanical sources such as wood cellulose. Pearl: A natural gemstone produced by living animals such as mollusks (particularly oysters). Natural pearls are not vegan and are typically more expensive than their synthetic counterparts, which may be vegan.

  1. Pepsin: A digestive enzyme sourced from animal stomachs.
  2. Can be used to make cheese and other homogenized foods.
  3. Placenta: Also known as afterbirth, the placenta is connected to a mammal fetus through the umbilical cord.
  4. Human, cow, pig and other mammal fetuses are nourished in utero with this organ, which is expelled during birth.

Can be found as an ingredient in haircare items and other beauty products. Polypeptide: A polymer chain found in protein molecules that can be derived either from animal collagen (see collagen above) or vegetable oil sources, particularly coconut. Most often used in personal care products, particularly in shampoos and conditioners.

  1. Propolis: Also known as bee glue.
  2. A naturally produced salivary resin that honeybees use to seal cracks in the hive.
  3. Used in supplements, vitamins and some naturopathic medications.
  4. Can also be used as a waxing agent for musical instruments and cars, or as an all-natural chewing gum ingredient.
  5. Rennet: The lining of ruminant mammal’s stomach.

Cow rennet is a common ingredient in cheese. Vegetable rennet is available. Retinol: Also known as vitamin A1, the only natural sources of this essential vitamin are animal products such as eggs, dairy, and cod liver oil. Synthetic, vegan-friendly retinol is available and may be an important supplement for vegans as dietary retinol intake is not possible on a vegan diet.

  1. Retinol is also used in some beauty products.
  2. Royal Jelly: A protein-rich nutrient substance secreted by worker honeybees to provide nutrition for the hive’s larvae and queen bee.
  3. Used as a medication in naturopathic settings, but its efficacy has been thoroughly disproven and it can even cause deadly allergic reactions.

Sable: The fur of the sable, a mammal in the marten species. Often used for brushes in both makeup and art. Schmaltz: Chicken fat. This Yiddish word is often used instead of the words “chicken fat” in ingredients lists. Sepia: A pigment that may use squid and other marine animal inks to get its dark brown color.

Found most often in expensive sepia inks. Shellac: Also known as confectioner’s glaze, shellac is an insect-derived resin that provides a shiny coating for candies. Any candy with a uniformly shiny, hard outer shell that looks glossy and polished probably uses shellac. This ingredient is also found in medications.

Silk: The fibrous material used by specific species of insect larvae to make cocoons. Used to create textiles and fibers for use in clothing, accessories, housewares and other products. Faux silk is available. Sponge: A multicellular water-dwelling animal that can be harvested and used for household and bathing sponges.

  1. Look out for labels like “sea sponge” and “all-natural sponge.” Synthetic cellulose sponges and loofahs are a vegan alternative.
  2. Squid Ink: The black defensive ink contained in ink sacs in marine cephalopod animals such as squid, cuttlefish, and octopi.
  3. Can be used as an ingredient in food, particularly in Italian and some Asian cuisines.

Stearic Acid: A fatty acid derived most commonly from animal fat. Shea butter and other botanical sources can also produce useable stearic acid. Most commonly used for personal care products such as soap, textile manufacturing and, in some cases, plaster casting.

Stearic acid can also be found in some fireworks. Suede: A type of leather made from animal hides. Faux suede and leather is available. Suet: A hard animal fat found in the abdomens of sheep and cows. Can be used as a fat for deep frying. Used primary in traditional recipes from the United Kingdom, including haggis and spotted dick.

Tallow: Rendered suet. Can be used as a cooking ingredient or for a variety of other applications, including soapmaking and the production of biodiesel fuel. Vellum: A translucent paper made from animal skin. Most commonly used for high-end book and artmaking, though it has mostly been replaced with more affordable paper, also called vellum, made from botanically-derived ingredients such as cellulose.

Vegan alternatives are widely available, but you may want to check when purchasing vellum to make sure it’s vegan. Vitamin B12: A vitamin with no known botanical sources. Used primarily for dietary supplements and multivitamins. Synthetic supplements are available and may be an important dietary supplement for vegans due to the fact that this vitamin is wholly absent from a plant-based diet.

Vitamin D: A class of fat-soluble vitamins vital for health in a number of areas ranging from bone density to mental health. Most D vitamins are available in a synthetic form, and foods supplemented with vitamin D tend to use the synthetic form. Vegans should avoid vitamin D3, which, in its all-natural form, is derived from animals such as fish or mammals.

  1. Wax: A wide-ranging class of substances that can be animal-derived, botanical, or synthetic.
  2. Beeswax, which is made by bees and is not vegan.
  3. It is a common ingredient in all-natural foods, personal care products and other products, including some art supplies.
  4. Soy and other wax alternatives are available.

Whey: A high-protein byproduct of cheesemaking. Anything with “whey” in the name, including whey protein isolate, is a dairy product and therefore not vegan. Wool: Textiles and other fabrics that use fur from sheep, alpacas and other animals. The fur is shaved from the animal while it is living and processed for use in the creation of clothing, housewares and other products.

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