Is Stearyl Alcohol Bad For Hair?

Is Stearyl Alcohol Bad For Hair
If you’ve ever used lotions, shampoos, or conditioners, you may have noticed they include a chemical called cetearyl alcohol. The good news is that cetearyl alcohol isn’t “bad” for you, your skin, or your hair. Most importantly, cetearyl alcohol is very different from “regular” alcohols, like ethanol.

Is stearyl alcohol good for hair?

Is Cetearyl Alcohol Safe for Your Hair? – Let’s take a look at what science has to say, Drying alcohols, as the name suggests, can be drying to the hair and scalp, and should be avoided as much as possible. But because this type of alcohol evaporates quickly, and helps a product to dry faster, it is simply not possible to make products such as hairspray without this ingredient.

You wouldn’t want to spend time on a nice blowout and styling to have your hairspray leave your clients’ hair all wet after, would you? But according to science, fatty alcohols, such as Cetearyl Alcohol, actually has properties that are very beneficial to hair and scalp ! Cetearyl Alcohol is hydrating, moisturizing and smoothening.

It helps to soften the hair and provide slip to help detangle hair better! This is why you will find this nice, hydrating fatty alcohol in our conditioners and hair care products. So, should you always go for “alcohol-free” hair products? Sometimes the answer is yes,

Is stearyl alcohol bad for curly hair?

Safe Alcohols Found in Curly Hair Products – These Long chain alcohols are considered safe and are often found in your hair products such as conditioners, Safe alcohols such as stearyl alcohol, and acetyl alcohol are derived from natural ingredients and fats like vegetable oil and nuts.

Cetyl alcohol Cetearyl alcohol Behenyl alcohol Stearyl alcohol Myristyl alcohol Lauryl alcohol Lanolin alcohol

What alcohols are bad for hair?

Alcohol is known in general to be drying, and while fun to have a few drinks on a night out, it isn’t generally regarded as great for your hair. As we’ve become more sophisticated and selective in the products we eat, drink and wear on our bodies, we’ve also grown more educated about the ingredients contained in our grooming and haircare products.

  1. If you’ve struggled with dry or damaged hair, chances are you’ve come across a common bit of advice: avoid products that contain alcohol.
  2. The general perception is that all alcohols are drying to our locks just as much as they are to our bodies, but not all alcohol is created equal when it comes to haircare.

While it has a reputation for drying, there’s more than one type of alcohol (in fact, there are many) not all of them are bad and there are some that are actually beneficial to the health of hair. Are all alcohols bad for hair? No, they are not, though the subtleties are a bit scientific; there is alcohol in hair products for a variety of reasons, and not all of them are damaging.

We tend to get confused about alcohol because it’s pretty much a generic term, and almost always seen as negative. Plus, most ingredient lists contain several different types of alcohols with different, admittedly rather confusing, names. It’s no wonder we think it’s the devil in disguise when it comes to our haircare.

The first thing it’s important to know is that alcohol is not a single chemical but a family of chemicals with differing properties. There are two major types of alcohols that are used within hair and skin care products: short-chain or drying alcohols and long-chain fatty or emulsifying alcohols.

The good and bad alcohols Get ready for a mini science lesson, but one with major plus points for your tresses. Short-chained alcohols are considered ‘bad’ because they can have limited benefits for most hair types as they have very few carbon atoms, which mean they’re generally used in hair products that need a quick drying effect, aka traditional hair sprays.

They evaporate quickly, so the styling agents attach faster and work better, but the flip side is that your hair is literally getting sucked dry. With prolonged use hair this causes the cuticle to roughen, leaving the hair dry, brittle and frizzy, and on the fast track to breakage.

  • Some of the most common short-chain alcohols that you will find in hair care products are ethanol, SD alcohol, denatured alcohol, propanol, propyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol – these are the ones it’s best to avoid.
  • Alcohol-free hair products – the holy grail? But what do we do if we need products that maintain hold and shape to our style? Most of us guard our best-loved beauty products with a fearsome love, so what are we to do if they could actually be damaging our hair? Most quick-acting products and aerosol hairsprays rely on the wrong type of alcohol to maintain hold, but Pantene has been working hard to formulate one without any alcohol at all.

Contrary to traditional hairsprays, Never Stray No Crunch Alcohol Free HairSpray is alcohol-free and therefore doesn’t dry the hair out in the same way. Not only does it not contain alcohol but is enriched with Pro-V complex, bamboo and silk extracts that locks in your look with a flexible, soft light-as-air look with a crunch-free finish.

  1. The same is true for Pantene Cheat Day Alcohol Free Dry Shampoo Foam, contrary to many dry shampoos in market, it’s completely alcohol-free, refreshing the hair from the root to tip in 60 seconds flat.
  2. Instead it uses natural tapioca to whip your back to life without washing, and without the drying effects of short-chain alcohols.
See also:  How Much Alcohol Is In Whisky?

Are there any good alcohols in hair products? Although many hair products have alcohol-named ingredients, there are some that deliver the opposite of the drying effects of short chain alcohols: meet the long chain fatty alcohols. These are the good guys to their bad short chain cousins and one of the ultimate nourishing ingredients.

Fatty alcohols tend to come from plants and oils and add to the smooth touch and texture of creams and lotions. They’re added to as thickeners and emulsifiers (aka ingredients that keep oil and water in formulas mixed together so it doesn’t separate) but they’re also super hydrating and highly beneficial to your hair.

When looking on the back of your bottle for the ingredients of your products, the most common fatty alcohols that you will find are: lauryl alcohol, cetyl alcohol, myristyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, behenyl alcohol and cetearyl alcohol. Is cetearyl alcohol bad for hair? One of the most common long chain fatty alcohols is this last ingredient, cetearyl alcohol and it’s vastly different from “regular” alcohols, like ethanol.

  • Found in most products for hair that’s dry or prone to frizz, it has incredible smoothing and moisturising properties.
  • Added to formulations for its luxurious slip and glide, it makes hair easier to detangle and keeps the hair hydrated and soft.
  • Think of it as your hair’s favourite alcoholic treat, a double shot of soothing and softening goodness.

Is all alcohol bad for hair? Just as heavy drinking can lead to damage to the health of your hair, so can the wrong types of alcohol product usage. Alcohol intake internally and externally through products leads to dehydration, which makes it difficult for long, healthy hair to thrive.

  1. Does alcohol increase hair growth? Sadly, the complete opposite is true.
  2. The more your body ingests, the more your hair weakens, and once it is weak, growth is almost impossible.
  3. Thinning hair is also a by-product of too much alcohol in the system because the body relies on the minerals zinc and iron for healthy hair growth that is reduced with excessive consumption.

In short, as with everything, enjoy both your drinks and your not-so good alcohol hair products in moderation. However, with Pantene’s Waterless Collection which features Cheat Day Alcohol Free Dry Shampoo Foam, Never Stray No Crunch Hair Spray and Curl Affair Curl (Re)Shaping Cream, you can get all the benefits of clean, fresh and perfectly styled hair, without the negative effects of alcohol. Is Stearyl Alcohol Bad For Hair

Is stearyl alcohol safe?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ruled stearyl alcohol safe as a food additive, and the independent Cosmetic Ingredient Review panel deems it safe as used in cosmetics.

What is the side effects of stearyl alcohol?

Side Effects – Most emollients can be used safely and effectively with no side effects. However, burning, stinging, redness, or irritation may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or promptly. If your doctor has prescribed this, remember that your doctor has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects.

  • Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.
  • Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects, including: unusual changes in the (such as turning white/soft/soggy from too much wetness), signs of,
  • A very serious to this drug is rare.
  • However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious, including:, /swelling (especially of the face//throat), severe,,

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US – Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

What is the difference between cetyl alcohol and stearyl alcohol for hair?

Fatty Alcohols: Cetyl Alcohol & Cetearyl Alcohol

Want to make your emulsion thicker, more creamy and stable? Just add 1-2% of either: cetyl alcohol (cetanol (1-hexadecanol C16));stearyl alcohol (1-octadecanol C18); orcetostearyl alcohol (blend of C16 and C18).

I’m a huge fan of these common higher alcohols. I use them in many product types including emulsions, hair conditioners, anhydrous balms/sticks. They are inexpensive, widely available, “natural” and provide emolliency, viscosity build and stability. Let’s dig a little deeper.

  • Cetyl alcohol melts at 49.3°C and stearyl alcohol at 58°C.
  • Many formulators like to use a combination of both.
  • Making the alkyl distribution wider, by mixing the different chain lengths (C16 and C18) results in a more robust formulation, ability to cope with a wider range of temperatures, improved stability and a better lamellar gel network.

You can buy a combination of C18 and C16 in a pre-made blend called, cetostearyl alcohol (commonly known as cetearyl alcohol) in ratios of: 30:70, 70:30 or 50:50. I like Croda’s Crodacol CS50 which is a 50:50 blend, has low odor and is purported to be less grainy than standard cetearyl alcohol blends.

  1. Some notable differences: Stearyl alcohol produces a whiter and more opaque product due to it’s longer carbon chain length.
  2. Cetyl alcohol breaks more easily when applied so gives a quicker spread and can hold onto more water than stearyl alcohol as it is more hydrophilic.
  3. This results in a higher gel phase which means a higher viscosity.
See also:  How To Get Used To Alcohol?

However stearyl alcohol has a different crystalline structure and is less polar resulting in a a more stable viscosity, unlike cetyl alcohol whose viscosity can increase over time. Do you use fatty alcohols in your formulas? What is your experience of them? : Fatty Alcohols: Cetyl Alcohol & Cetearyl Alcohol

What is stearyl alcohol in hair products?

Approved Ingredients Stearyl alcohol is an organic compound, usually appearing in the form of white crystalline granules, derived from fats and oils. Stearyl alcohol is in a class known as fatty alcohols, which, unlike irritating types of alcohols, do not dry out skin. Stearyl alcohol is typically produced through hydrogenation (process change from a liquid into a solid or semi-solid state) of stearic acid.

  1. Stearic acid is a saturated fatty acid prevalent in animal fats, but rich plant sources of stearic acid include palm fruit, cocoa butter and shea butter.
  2. The stearyl alcohol we use is derived from plant (non-animal) sources.
  3. Stearyl alcohol can be used in personal care products as an emollient, helping to nourish skin and hair, leaving them soft and smooth.

This ingredient also has emulsion stabilizing properties, and can be used to help balance and add structure to oil-water formulations. Other names: C 18 H 38 O, Alcohol Stearylicus, 1-Octadecanol, 1-Hydroxyoctadecane INCI Name: Stearyl Alcohol Ingredient origins: Oil Palm Fruit Role: Emulsifying Agent, Emulsion Stabiliser Common name: Stearyl Alcohol EWG score: The EWG score is a hazard score ranging from 1-2 (low hazard), 3-6 (moderate hazard) and 7-10 (high hazard) published by the Environmental Working Group.

Why is stearyl alcohol in hair conditioner?

More safety Information: – CIR Safety Review: The CIR Expert Panel noted that Stearyl is found naturally in various mammalian tissues and the metabolism of Stearyl Alcohol and Oleyl Alcohol in animals is well described. Due to the chemical nature and benign biological activity of these compounds, they are not suspected of significant potential for carcinogenesis, reproductive or developmental effects. If they are made from plants, Stearyl Alcohol, Oleyl Alcohol and Octyldodecanol may be used in cosmetics and personal care products according to the general provisions of the Cosmetics Regulation of the European Union. Ingredients of animal origin must comply with the European Union animal by-products regulations.

Fatty alcohols, including Stearyl and Oleyl Alcohols occur in small quantities as components of wax esters in plants and animals. The compounds serve to protect the outer surface of plants and animals from water loss. Stearyl, Oleyl Alcohol and Octyldodecanol function as stabilizers, – emulsifying agents, antifoaming agents, and skin conditioning agents – emollient in cosmetics and personal care products.

: Stearyl Alcohol

Does stearyl alcohol cause dryness?

Benefits of Stearyl Alcohol for Skin – On the flip side, because stearyl alcohol is a fatty alcohol, “it’s not drying, non-irritating, and usually beneficial when used consistently,” says Lain. “It acts as an emollient, leaving the skin feeling smooth and soft by forming a protective layer on the surface and helping to prevent moisture loss.” It’s often combined with cetyl alcohol (another fatty alcohol) to create cetearyl alcohol, which also has emollient properties, says Hayag.

Is cetyl alcohol stearyl alcohol good for hair?

– Cetearyl alcohol has emollient properties, which means it softens and smooths the skin and hair. Manufacturers also use this ingredient to alter the texture and performance of their formulas. They may add it to products to:

create an emulsion, which is a blend of oils and waterstabilize foamsincrease foaming capacitychange the thickness of liquids

Is stearyl alcohol from coconut oil?

Stearyl Alcohol NF is a pure and natural fatty alcohol from the fatty acid of Coconut Oil.

Is cetyl alcohol bad for curly hair?

What to watch out for – Some alcohols may cause our delicate curly hair to be dried and frizzy, and we do well to avoid those in most cases. However, other alcohols, such as cetyl alcohol, can help to condition our hair and make it soft and manageable. In general, curlies might want to be cautious of short-chain alcohols, and not so worried about fatty alcohols, benzyl alcohol or proplyene glycol. As with all ingredients, it is always best to use trial and error as a method to find what gives you the best results. Take a glance at this article about what else you should look out for in your curly hair products, check out these alcohol-free products (if you’d rather go without”>, and share your thoughts with us in the comments below! This article was originally published in October 2004 and has been updated with additional graphics.

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Is stearyl alcohol a oil?

Minimum Gelling Concentration and Microstructure – Stearyl alcohol is one of the most promising fatty alcohols to be used for food applications as an oil-structuring agent. Fig.9.4 shows peanut oil containing 2.0%, 2.5%, and 3.0% of stearyl alcohol (C 18 OH).

  • The minimum gelling concentration (MGC), that is the lowest concentration that is permitted to obtain a self-standing material, is 2.5% (w/w).
  • As described by Valoppi et al.
  • 2017), the MGC depends on the chain length of the fatty alcohol and decreases as the chain length of fatty alcohols increases.

The MGC is also affected by the cooling rate applied: upon fast cooling, the ability of molecules to gel is reduced with a concomitant increase of the MGC. For instance, the MGC of stearyl alcohol in peanut oil increases from 2.5% to 7.0% (w/w) upon cooling at 5 and 40°C/min, respectively.

  • This is due to the changes in crystal size and morphology as a consequence of the cooling rate used during oleogel preparation.
  • Considering Fig.9.5, it is evident that a slow cooling rate (5°C/min) of oil with 5% of C 18 OH leads to the formation of crystal structures 10 times larger than at a fast cooling rate (40°C/min) ( Fig.9.5 cf.1A and 1B).

Similar results were obtained for C 16 OH-, C 20 OH-, and C 22 OH-containing oleogels ( Valoppi et al., 2017 ). Is Stearyl Alcohol Bad For Hair Figure 9.4, From left to right, stearyl alcohol-containing oleogel samples with 2.0%, 2.5%, and 3.0% (w/w) concentrations of C 18 OH in peanut oil. Samples in this picture are tested for minimum gelling concentration which was 2.5%. Is Stearyl Alcohol Bad For Hair Figure 9.5, Polarized light (1) and scanning electron (2) micrographs of oleogels containing 5% C 18 OH cooled at 5°C/min (A) and 40°C/min (B). Scale bars: 200 μm for 1A, 1B, and 2A; 30 μm for 2B. Modified from Valoppi, F., Calligaris, S., Marangoni, A.G., 2017.

  • Structure and physical properties of oleogels containing peanut oil and saturated fatty alcohols. Eur.J.
  • Lipid Sci.
  • Technol.119, 1600252 with permission of John Wiley and Sons.
  • Upon cooling, different crystalline microstructures form in the fatty alcohol-containing oleogels, such as rosette-, needle-, mica-, and platelet-like structures.

All microstructures are characterized by an approximate length of 500–1500 μm, except platelets that are in the 30–60 μm rage ( Blach et al., 2016; Gandolfo et al., 2004; Schaink et al., 2007; Valoppi et al., 2017 ) ( Fig.9.5, 1A ). However, Blach et al.

  • 2016) and Valoppi et al.
  • 2017) demonstrated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that all the structures observed using optical microscopy are basically the same platelet-like structure oriented in different ways with respect to the glass coverslip ( Fig.9.5 cf.1A and 2A).
  • This is in agreement with other findings on plant wax-containing oleogels ( Blake and Marangoni, 2015 ).

The interconnection among platelets, responsible for the self-standing property of fatty alcohol-containing oleogels, is clearly visible in Fig.9.5, 2A obtained by using SEM. Read full chapter URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128142707000095

Which alcohol is good for hair growth?

4. Vodka For Hair Growth – You Will Need

  • 10 mL Vodka
  • 60 mL Shampoo

Processing Time 5 minutes Process

  1. Pour the ingredients in a shampoo dispenser and shake well to combine.
  2. Wash your hair as you normally would with this vodka-shampoo mixture.
  3. Let your hair air-dry.

How Often? Once a week. Why This Works Vodka stimulates hair growth as it cleanses the scalp and boosts the blood circulation,

Are cetearyl and stearyl alcohol the same?

Cetyl stearyl is a mixture of fatty alcohols with 16 (cetyl alcohol) and 18 (stearyl alcohol) carbon atoms. It is often sold as cetostearyl alcohol, C16-C18 alcohol, cetearyl alcohol and various other names. As with all fatty alcohol blends, it can be derived from both natural and synthetic sources.

What does stearyl alcohol do in shampoo?

More safety Information: – CIR Safety Review: The CIR Expert Panel noted that Stearyl is found naturally in various mammalian tissues and the metabolism of Stearyl Alcohol and Oleyl Alcohol in animals is well described. Due to the chemical nature and benign biological activity of these compounds, they are not suspected of significant potential for carcinogenesis, reproductive or developmental effects. If they are made from plants, Stearyl Alcohol, Oleyl Alcohol and Octyldodecanol may be used in cosmetics and personal care products according to the general provisions of the Cosmetics Regulation of the European Union. Ingredients of animal origin must comply with the European Union animal by-products regulations.

  • Fatty alcohols, including Stearyl and Oleyl Alcohols occur in small quantities as components of wax esters in plants and animals.
  • The compounds serve to protect the outer surface of plants and animals from water loss.
  • Stearyl, Oleyl Alcohol and Octyldodecanol function as stabilizers, – emulsifying agents, antifoaming agents, and skin conditioning agents – emollient in cosmetics and personal care products.

: Stearyl Alcohol

Is cetyl alcohol stearyl alcohol good for hair?

– Cetearyl alcohol has emollient properties, which means it softens and smooths the skin and hair. Manufacturers also use this ingredient to alter the texture and performance of their formulas. They may add it to products to:

create an emulsion, which is a blend of oils and waterstabilize foamsincrease foaming capacitychange the thickness of liquids

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