Must Have Alcohol For Home Bar?

Must Have Alcohol For Home Bar
Liquor List

  • 1) Vodka. Vodka is used in many different cocktails and mixed drinks, so it should be the first bottle on your liquor list.
  • 2) Gin. Martinis and gin & tonics are so popular that it’s essential to have a classic London dry gin behind your bar.
  • 3) Whiskey.
  • 4) Rum.
  • 5) Tequila.
  • 6) Wine.
  • 7) Champagne.
  • 8) Beer.

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What is the best starter alcohol for a bar?

What is the most common liquor? – If you’re just starting out in the bar scene, and you want something classic for your home bar, picking up the most common liquors is a good starting point. For the most common liquor options, you’ll want some rum, as well as some tequila, whiskey, and vodka. A lot of basic drinks are made with those liquors as the base alcohol. Must Have Alcohol For Home Bar

What are the must have alcohols on a bar cart?

Essential bottles for the bar cart Make sure you have a good quality bottle for the main spirits – gin, whisky, vodka, tequila and rum. ‘You want a Classic London Dry gin – a style that isn’t too powerful, therefore works whether you’re serving up a gin and tonic, or any kind of gin cocktail,’ advises Stefan.

What is the most popular alcohol in bars?

Vodka Highballs – Vodka is the most used liquor in the bar and the star of recipes like the bloody mary, Moscow mule (ginger beer), and vodka tonic (tonic water). It’s also often mixed with a single fruit juice. The cape codder (cranberry juice—aka vodka cranberry), greyhound (grapefruit juice), and screwdriver (orange juice) are three essential vodka drinks.

  • Hairy Navel : peach schnapps, orange juice
  • Melon Ball : melon liqueur, pineapple juice
  • Vodka Red Bull : Red Bull

What is a top shelf drink at a bar?

What is top-shelf liquor? – Let’s start by breaking down the terminology. Top Shelf: Bottles on the highest shelves behind a bar. Though there’s no hard rule as to cost, these tend to be bottles that would retail for $50 or more in a store. Mid Shelf: Bottles on the lower half of the shelf behind a bartender.

  1. With liquor, this would usually be bottles that fall in the $25–50 range.
  2. Bottom Shelf: A slight misnomer, most spirits considered “bottle shelf” aren’t actually displayed on the shelves at all, but are usually kept in the well or rail, a small shelf under the bar and out of sight but positioned closest to the bartenders’ fingertips for easy of frequent use.

The theory behind the top shelf/bottom shelf divide is simple: In a bar, more expensive spirits sit on the harder-to-reach higher shelves since they’re ordered less frequently, while workhorse bottles at a lower price point are kept within easy reach.

What makes the perfect bar cart?

‘ A mixing glass, barspoon, jigger, peeler, bottle opener and a julep strainer should do you well.’ To take it to the next level, he also suggests having dasher bottles in stock, and a small sealable bottle, which makes the addition of bitters and modifiers (such as vermouth or Campari) ‘more elegant and controllable.’

Is it worth having a home bar?

Drinks – Long gone are the days of waking up to a depleted bank account after a fun night out. The advantages of having a home bar include saving the money you would be gratuitously spending at a bar. Pay a quarter of the price for a drink that is double the size of one you would grudgingly buy from the club.

  • Creating drinks at home gives you an opportunity to sharpen your bartending skills while saving money.
  • Consider a home bar a savvy financial investment for your inner mixologist.
  • Another incentive for having a bar in-house is that the drinks will always be up to par with your preference.
  • There’s no disappointment like hearing a bar has run out of your favorite brew or doesn’t serve your favorite red wine.
See also:  Is Mead Alcoholic?

This problem disappears entirely with an in-home bar. Stocking your bar with your liquid favorites ensures it has all the necessities for a spectacular night.

What is the 3 most popular drink?

Beer is the world’s most widely consumed alcoholic drink, and is the third-most consumed drink overall, after water and tea.

What are the 6 basic cocktails?

Six basic drinks – Embury’s six basic drinks are the Daiquiri, the Jack Rose, the Manhattan, the Martini, the Old Fashioned, and the Sidecar, Embury’s preferred recipe for each is: Daiquiri

  • 8 parts white Cuban rum
  • 2 parts lime juice
  • 1 part simple syrup

Shake with much finely crushed ice and strain well into a chilled cocktail glass, Jack Rose

  • 8 parts applejack
  • 2 parts lemon juice
  • 1 part Grenadine

Shake vigorously with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon, if desired. Manhattan

  • 5 parts American whiskey
  • 1 part Italian (sweet) vermouth
  • dash of Angostura bitters to each drink

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass and serve garnished with a Maraschino cherry, Martini

  • 7 parts English gin
  • 1 part French (dry) vermouth

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass, twist lemon peel over the top and serve garnished with an olive, preferably one stuffed with any kind of nut, Embury also states that sherry is a nice substitute for vermouth. Old Fashioned

  • 12 parts American whiskey
  • 1 part simple syrup
  • 1–3 dashes Angostura bitters to each drink

In an old-fashioned glass, add bitters to simple syrup and stir. Add about 1 ounce of whiskey and stir again. Add two cubes of cracked, but not crushed, ice and top off with the rest of the whiskey. Twist lemon peel over the top and serve garnished with the lemon peel and a maraschino cherry. Sidecar

  • 8 parts Cognac or Armagnac
  • 2 parts lemon juice
  • 1 part Cointreau or triple sec

Shake vigorously with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a twist of lemon, if desired.

What is the most loved alcohol?

Beer – Beer is the most popular alcoholic beverage worldwide. In fact, after water and tea, beer is the most commonly-consumed drink in the world. Beer is also most likely the oldest alcoholic drink in history. A standard beer, whether it be a lager or an ale, has between 4% to 6% ABV, although some beers have higher or lower concentrations of alcohol.

What is the most popular alcohol in bars?

Vodka Highballs – Vodka is the most used liquor in the bar and the star of recipes like the bloody mary, Moscow mule (ginger beer), and vodka tonic (tonic water). It’s also often mixed with a single fruit juice. The cape codder (cranberry juice—aka vodka cranberry), greyhound (grapefruit juice), and screwdriver (orange juice) are three essential vodka drinks.

  • Hairy Navel : peach schnapps, orange juice
  • Melon Ball : melon liqueur, pineapple juice
  • Vodka Red Bull : Red Bull

What are the 6 spirits in bartending?

Brandy, Gin, Rum, Tequila, Vodka, and Whiskey Philippe TURPIN / Getty Images Among the many distilled spirits available, there are just six base liquors: brandy, gin, rum, tequila, vodka, and whiskey. While distilled using similar methods, each is unique in flavor, and there are distinct styles within each category.

  • Wittelsback bernd / E+ / Getty Images Brandy is often enjoyed on its own. It’s popularly featured in several classic cocktails and tends to be used in drinks that include just a few ingredients. However, many modern brandy recipes break this mold and experiment with brandy in some unique flavor combinations.
    • Distilled From : Brandy is distilled from fruit, While grapes are used for traditional brandy, the liquor can be distilled from other fruits such as apples, apricots, cherries, and peaches.
    • Flavor Profile : Brandy tastes like fruity burnt wine with a pleasant oakiness.
    • Aged : It varies by style, but brandy is typically aged in oak and often blended.
    • Produced In : Brandy is distilled worldwide. Certain regions of the world make specific brandy styles, such as cognac, Armagnac, and pisco.
    • Styles : Cognac, Armagnac, Spanish Brandy, Pisco, American Brandy, Grappa, Eau-de-vie, Flavored Brandy (non-grape brandy)
    • Alcohol Content : Typically 40 percent alcohol by volume (ABV, 80 proof)
    • Regulations : There are no distinct worldwide regulations for brandy, though some styles must be produced in certain regions using particular ingredients or methods.
  • Ton Koene / age fotostock / Getty Images Gin’s dry profile makes it a perfect candidate for dry (non-sweet) cocktails, including many classics and martinis, It is a nice base for cocktails with just a few ingredients and pairs well with lighter mixers and fruits and naturally works well with herbs.
    • Distilled From : Gin is distilled from neutral grains such as barley, corn, rye, and wheat and flavored with a variety of botanicals, which vary by brand.
    • Flavor Profile : Gin is herbal and dry. The primary flavor that defines gin comes from juniper berries, which impart its signature “piney” aroma and taste. The older style of gins (e.g., genever, Old Tom, Plymouth) have a gentle sweetness.
    • Aged : Typically unaged
    • Produced In : Gin is produced worldwide. Historically, it is best-known as a product of Europe (particularly the Netherlands) and the United Kingdom.
    • Styles : London Dry Gin, Plymouth Gin, Old Tom Gin, Genever, New American (or Modern-Styled) Gin
    • Alcohol Content : Typically 40 to 47 percent ABV (80 to 94 proof)
    • Regulations : There are no distinct worldwide regulations for gin though it is accepted that juniper berries must be included.
  • Bloomberg Creative Photos / Getty Images Rum’s sweeter flavor makes it one of the more versatile spirits. It was among the first liquors to be mixed into drinks, so there are some excellent classic rum cocktails to choose from. It is the obvious base for tropical drinks and appears in several warm cocktails.
    • Distilled From : Rum is distilled from some form of sugar. Molasses is very common, and some rum uses pure sugar cane.
    • Flavor Profile : Rum has a sweet toasted sugar taste that varies by style and region.
    • Aged : Light rum is typically not aged, and other rums are often aged in oak barrels to some extent. Due to climate, aging times vary greatly; warm climate rum requires less barrel time than rum from colder climates. Rum is also often blended.
    • Produced In : The Caribbean and South America are best known for rum production, though it is made worldwide.
    • Styles : Light Rum, Gold Rum, Dark Rum, Over-Proof Rum, Spiced Rum, Cachaça, Flavored Rum
    • Alcohol Content : Typically 40 percent ABV (80 proof). Overproof rums can reach 75 percent ABV (150 proof).
    • Regulations : There are no distinct worldwide regulations, but some rums must adhere to regional laws and traditions. For example, cachaça must be produced in Brazil.
  • The Spruce / S&C Design Studios Tequila has a great flavor profile that mixes well into a variety of cocktails, There are, of course, the margaritas and frozen cocktails in which tequila is mixed with any fruit imaginable. It also makes a perfect base for spicy cocktails and is very popular for party shots.
    • Distilled From : Tequila is distilled from the fermented juices of the agave plant.
    • Flavor Profile : Most tequila has a vegetal, earthy flavor with semi-sweet and spicy tones.
    • Aged : Blanco (or silver) tequila is un-aged. Reposado and añejo tequilas are aged, often in used whiskey (bourbon) oak barrels. Gold tequila is blended.
    • Produced In : Tequila can only be made in Mexico. Agave spirits produced outside of Mexico cannot be labeled “tequila.”
    • Styles : Blanco, Reposado, Añejo, Extra-Añejo, Gold (Other agave spirits are mezcal, pulque, sotol, raicila, and baconara, but these are not “tequilas.”)
    • Alcohol Content : Typically 40 to 50 percent ABV (80 to 100 proof)
    • Regulations : Tequila is the most tightly regulated liquor. The laws are defined under an Appellation of Origin, which was first adopted in 1978, and the industry is overseen by the Tequila Regulatory Council (CRT).

    Continue to 5 of 6 below.

  • Matt Cardy / Stringer / Getty Images News Vodka’s neutral taste makes it the most versatile spirit available today. Vodka cocktails include almost every imaginable flavor profile, from sweet to savory, fruits to herbs, and spices to sparkling mixers. Martinis and shooters are popular vodka drinks as well.
    • Distilled From : Vodka can be distilled from almost anything, and it can be a catch-all category for white spirits that don’t fit elsewhere. Neutral grains (rye, corn, wheat, etc.) and potatoes are the most common, though some vodkas are distilled from beets, grapes, and other bases.
    • Flavor Profile : Vodka has a neutral alcohol/ethanol taste. This can varies greatly depending on the distillate base and added flavorings. Quite often, vodka is distinguished more by texture: oily vs. medicinal.
    • Aged : Vodka is rarely aged.
    • Produced In : Vodka is made everywhere and is traditionally known as a spirit from Russia and Poland.
    • Styles : The base typically distinguishes clear vodka it was distilled from and/or the region it was produced. Flavored vodkas are a popular category.
    • Alcohol Content : Typically 40 to 50 ABV (80 to 100 proof)
    • Regulations : Vodka is open to interpretation, and there are no regulations on its production.
  • Bloomberg Creative Photos / Getty Images Whiskey is another of the more versatile cocktail bases. With so many styles, there is the opportunity for great diversity in flavor profiles. It mixes well with other liquors to create complex drinks, and it pairs well with many fruits, particularly the darker fruits. Warm drinks are also very popular with whiskey.
    • Distilled From : Whiskey is distilled from malted grains. It varies by style, but corn, rye, wheat, and barley are common. Many whiskies use a combination of a few grains in the mashbill.
    • Flavor Profile : Roasted, malted grain with oak undertones should be expected in any whiskey. There are also distinct characteristics in each style.
    • Aged : Whiskey is typically aged in charred oak. Some styles, such as bourbon, require new barrels while others use a mixture of new and previously used whiskey or wine barrels. Moonshine (also called white dog) is the primary exception to aging. Some whiskeys are blended, while others are single malts,
    • Produced In : Whiskey is produced throughout the world, and the various styles are often defined by the country or region in which they’re produced.
    • Styles : Bourbon, Canadian Whisky, Irish Whiskey, Japanese Whisky, Rye Whiskey, Scotch Whisky, Tennessee Whiskey, Blended Whiskey, Flavored Whiskey
    • Alcohol Content : Typically 40 to 50 percent ABV (80 to 100 proof) or higher
    • Regulations : Most whiskey styles have their own distinct regulations governed by the country of origin. Those simply labeled “whiskey” or “blended whiskey” generally do not fall into a regulated category.

The Spruce Eats uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

What Is A Standard Drink? National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohols-effects-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/what-standard-drink.

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