Is Soju Alcohol?

Is Soju Alcohol
This week, the 2018 Winter Olympics will kick off in PyeongChang, South Korea, While the athletes probably won’t be among this group (at least not until they’re finished with competition), a good number of people will celebrate meals by knocking back some soju, Is Soju Alcohol Soju is traditionally consumed as shots. Getty Images How is it made? Traditional soju is made from a blend of rice and grains. From the 1960s to the 1990s, using rice was banned in soju production because it was in such short supply, so sojus were made with other starches like sweet potatoes and wheat.

  • Even though the ban is no longer in place, many soju producers look beyond rice for their starches.
  • How is it consumed? In Korean company, soju is typically drunk out of small glasses and imbibers don’t traditionally serve themselves.
  • It’s very interactive,” says Simon Kim, the owner of Cote, a new and buzzy Korean steakhouse in New York City, which serves four premium sojus and uses the liquor in cocktails.

“I pour you a glass, you pour me a glass, we toast, drink, and then do it all over again.” Since it’s about 20-percent ABV, it sits somewhere between wine and harder booze like gin and whiskey in terms of potency. Is Soju Alcohol Soju is known for its green bottles. Getty Images What does it taste like? “Rubbing alcohol,” says Kim. “Watered-down vodka” is another way he describes the flavor. The taste can vary, but in cocktails you’ll see it used as a vodka substitute. How much does it cost? Next to nothing, which probably explains its popularity. Is Soju Alcohol Courtesy Chum Churum Original Soju (375-ml) Buy Now $8.99 Jinro 24 Soju (1.75 L) Buy Now $16.99 Is Soju Alcohol Simon Kim owns Cote, New York City’s first Korean steakhouse. Gary He Is Soju Alcohol Contributing Digital Editor Sam Dangremond is a Contributing Digital Editor at Town & Country, where he covers men’s style, cocktails, travel, and the social scene.

Does soju count as alcohol?

What a Newbie Needs to Know about Soju, One of the World’s Most Popular Spirits Even if you fancy yourself a true connoisseur of liquors, you may be surprised to learn that based on the sales, the most popular spirit in the world isn’t vodka, whisky or rum but soju, a traditional Korean drink.

(The soju brand Jinro is the best-selling spirit in the world, according to,) Though many Westerners once tended to dismiss soju as a low-alcohol “Korean vodka” you might quaff at a karaoke bar, the liquor is becoming increasingly visible in the West, and you may find yourself downing a shot or two at a fancy bar sooner than you think.

“Soju’s on a similar trajectory as mezcal,” said Kyungmoon Kim, former head of wine and beverage at the Michelin-starred Jungsik restaurant in New York, and founder of KSM Imports, which specializes in artisanal liquors from South Korea. “Ten or 15 years ago, nobody thought of mezcal except as a cheap bottle with a little worm inside that gave you a headache.

Now there are so many different mezcals with different price points, depending on where the mezcal came from, up to $200 a bottle, and people are starting to understand the flavor profile and story behind each product. Soju right now everyone knows as flavorless, green-bottle soju, so we’re trying to change people’s perceptions to see that soju is a beverage with a lot of flavor and complexity.” Pexels / Roi Mojado Soju is an alcoholic beverage distilled from various starchy crops, originally and primarily still produced on the Korean peninsula.

The alcohol content can range anywhere from around 15% to over 50%, and the quality can vary greatly. It got its start in the 13th century, when invading Mongols brought with them distillation techniques they themselves had learned in the Middle East and similar to those still used today to make single-malt scotch or cognac.

Soju” in fact means “burnt liquor,” in reference to how it’s made. At this point, soju was made only from rice wine, and averaged about 40% to 50% alcohol. Eventually, each town of a reasonable size had its own local soju distiller; those distillers sold to their neighbors and had a recipe that was handed down from generation to generation.

In 1965, amid shortages of the staple of the Korean diet, the South Korean government passed a law that forbade rice in the making of soju, so soju makers switched to substitutes like barley, sweet potatoes, wheat and tapioca. To increase profits, they began diluting soju, too, a trend that continues to this day, as well as adding sweeteners and other flavors to make their product more palatable.

Those changes also had unintended consequences in shaking up the South Korean alcohol industry and have been blamed for giving rise to a heavy drinking culture in the country. “It forced a lot of small brewers to close down, and the big conglomerates who could use barley or sweet potato or even imported tapioca to keep the costs down were the only ones to survive,” Kim said.

“Those products made sense at a time when people barely made enough money to bring food to the table and needed to get through the day, and cheap soju still brings nostalgic memories for our fathers’ and grandfathers’ generations, but the tradition of distilled rice wine pretty much disappeared.” In 1999, the government lifted the rice ban, but cheap soju only continued to grow in popularity both inside and outside of South Korea.

Still, artisanal soju makers have started to gain a following by resurrecting the age-old methods and putting out higher-alcohol soju made from rice. Though it’s tempting to compare Korea’s most famous alcoholic beverage to Japan’s most famous alcoholic beverage, sake, that’s a bit of an apples-to-oranges situation.

Sake is a rice wine (though it’s actually brewed like beer), while soju is a distilled beverage. Koreans have their own rice wine, makgeolli, which is an analog to Japanese sake, while Japan has shochu, which is similar to soju. (“Soju” and “shochu” are even written with the same Chinese characters.) Soju is mostly drunk as a shot, downed in a single gulp.

The host will serve the eldest guest first, then everyone else. Instead of “cheers,” say ” geonbae, ” which literally means “dry the glass” and is a sign of respect to the pourer. Always finish what’s in your glass before accepting another pour, and no one should ever fill their glass themselves. Serve and receive pours of soju with both hands—to do otherwise is disrespectful.

There’s a misconception floating around that you have to turn your head to the side and look away from the pourer when you drink, but that’s probably based on a foreigner misreading the fact that eye contact is not common practice in Korean culture—it’s seen as aggressive in a society where polite deference is the default.

Popular soju-based drinks include what’s sometimes referred to as a “yogurt soju cocktail,” which isn’t made with actual yogurt but with Yakult, a sweet, milky Japanese probiotic drink that comes in small plastic bottles. The recipe’s as simple as they get: Mix one bottle of Yakult with one bottle of soju (any inexpensive, “green bottle” soju will do).

Not surprisingly, it’s a cocktail associated with younger drinkers. More broadly popular is somaek, a portmanteau of “soju” and “maekju,” Korean for “beer.” It’s basically a boilermaker—drop a shot of soju in a glass of beer and gulp it down. Soju is an easy substitute for vodka in most recipes.

Im recommends soju in any of the martini family of cocktails, while barley soju, with its spicier grain finish, works well in place of whiskey. If you can find it, a pine-based soju is an excellent stand-in for gin. Look for higher-quality artisanal soju, if possible, as you’ll find it much more complex and intriguing.

Pairing soju with food isn’t a big thing in Korea, as the typical meal doesn’t involve courses but everything on the table at once in a communal setting, so you can’t approach it like you would a wine pairing, where the food and wine get equal billing.

  • It can give a supporting complement to the food rather than, like wine, actualy making the food more complex,” Kim said.
  • The traditional rice-based soju goes well with beef dishes, and there’s barley soju that works nicely with pork belly.” Soju typically lives in the Asian section of your local liquor store, alongside Japanese sake and shochu.

It’s also possible to order soju online in most states. Most of what you’ll find in the States will be the cheaper, mass-market stuff, but it’s worth exploring your better-connected stores for the occasional standouts that have made it across the Pacific.

  1. The company dominates the soju market, accounting for half of South Korea’s soju sales.
  2. It’s reintroduced old-style packaging, specifically a sky-blue bottle with the label “Jinro Is Back,” which contains a clean, neutral soju that is a pleasant, refreshing example of what a modern soju can be.
  3. By The Han, is made from the ripened Asian golden plum and cold-filtered and has a floral aroma with dry aftertaste.

“Seoul Night will take your soju game to the next level, and you will never look back,” Kim said., by Solsonju, is made from an old family recipe with rice, pine needles and spruce tea. Kim described it as “exceptionally nuanced, yet offers a refreshing finish with a hint of juniper and sansho pepper spice.” Considered the most exclusive soju available today, Samhae soju was once served only to Korean aristocracy, and today boasts the Intangible Cultural Heritage stamp from the government.

Does soju get you drunk?

How Much Soju Will Get You Drunk? – Is Soju Alcohol To get intoxicated, it will take about five to seven standard drinks of soju. A glass of soju is typically 50ml, so one bottle of soju can make around seven shots. Generally, the average shots of soju you can take to get drunk are between five to seven, which makes roughly one soju bottle.

But if you’re drinking with friends, you would never stop at a single bottle, right? If you consume two bottles, you might get drunk the moment you finish the second bottle. How about three to four bottles of soju? Well, you can probably pass out and not remember a thing the next day, plus the “unpleasant feeling” of a soju hangover.

But mind you — this won’t apply to everybody, as there are factors of how alcohol affects the body, including your alcohol tolerance, body composition, the way you’re drinking, and the soju type you’re consuming.

Can kids drink soju?

There is no acceptable amount of alcohol that is considered safe for children. Children metabolize alcohol faster than adults. This means that even a small amount of alcohol can lead to higher blood-alcohol concentrations. This can lead to low blood sugar, coma, and problems regulating body temperature.

Is soju low in alcohol?

Soju Is the Low-Alcohol Booze You Need in Your Life There’s a lot to love about soju, the Korean spirit that dunks on the rest of its competition (in 2016 alone, Jinro sold 75.91 million 9-liter cases of its green bottle soju, making it the most-sold spirit on the planet).

It’s smooth and easy to drink, a team player in cocktails that’s a thousand times less basic than vodka. “Soju is the top-selling liquor in the world,” says Taeeun Yoon, bar supervisor of at the Four Seasons in Seoul. “Basically, it is made from any grains, like vodka: traditionally rice, but you can make it with wheat, barley, rye, sweet potato.” It’s less potent than the Russian stuff, too.

Soju is usually about 18-25% ABV compared to vodka’s 40%, or the 25-45% of shōchū, the similarly named Japanese grain spirit. That lower ABV means it’s not going to blow out your palate (or your wits), making soju a solid pick to pair with food. Think of it as your new dinner party go-to.

There are just two soju options to choose from on the menu at, a date-night-able new restaurant in New York where chef and owner Mihyun Han serves traditional and contemporary Korean cuisine. “One is more fruity and floral, the other is more dry,” the server explains of Dae Jang Bu and Hwayo. Both have their own strengths that appeal to different preferences, and both stand up to Han’s delicate and hearty creations.

Soju’s magic that way, a no-brainer to stock in your fridge at home. As the soju market continues to flourish, artisanal options are increasingly available from Korea, Brooklyn, and beyond. To better understand the spirit, we talked to Yoon and other soju experts to catch us up on the basics.

How strong is 1 bottle of soju?

Soju Always Brings the Party – Starch or grain aside, soju’s the go-to booze for Korean celebrations. Its vaguely sweet, milky flavor makes drinking an entire bottle easy. “In a fun way, it’s kind of a dangerous alcohol,” says Max Soh, general manager and beverage director of New York’s intimate and chic Korean restaurant Oiji,

  • On average, soju is about 20% ABV, which is between hard liquor and wine.
  • You’re drinking it and it kind of sneaks up on you.
  • The next thing you know, the bottle is gone.” Soh says the tradition of drinking a bottle of soju is ingrained from a young age.
  • It’s not the best liquor in the world, but it’s a social thing,” he says.

“A little green bottle, shot glasses around. We serve each other and you have to pour it with two hands for older people and you have to receive it with two hands from the older people. There are a lot of little traditions like that.”

Is soju stronger than vodka?

Soju Goes Where Vodka Cannot Tread You can get a mojito, a cosmo and even assorted martinis at Vine, a new fondue restaurant and nightspot in Hollywood. That wouldn’t be unusual at most bars in town, but Vine has only a beer and wine permit. It’s not breaking any laws, so what’s in the cocktails? Soju, a Korean variation on vodka traditionally made from rice but more commonly from sweet potatoes these days.

With 24% alcohol, soju is stronger than beer (4% to 5%) or wine (about 13%) but packs a weaker punch than virtually all vodkas, which are 40% alcohol. A part of traditional Korean cuisine, soju is often enjoyed with meals, but because many Korean mom and pop restaurants had only beer and wine licenses, they were unable to sell it.

(A new “general” or distilled spirits license costs $12,000 or more, according to Dave Gill, a district administrator for the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, and a beer and wine license runs only $548 and often faces far less opposition from neighbors.) After some lobbying by the Korean Restaurant Owners Assn., a bill by Sen.

  • Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) passed in 1998, allowing the sale of soju by establishments previously licensed to sell only beer and wine in California.
  • Soju is served as a traditional drink accompanying spicy Korean meals and used to enhance the meal’s flavor,” reads the analysis of the bill.
  • At first, few bar owners outside the Asian community were aware of the bill, so sales of soju were limited to Korean and a few Japanese places.

(The Japanese version, shochu, is almost identical and also can now be poured legally by establishments with beer and wine licenses.) But sales of soju shot up immediately, says Alex Kim, marketing manager for Jinro America Inc., the largest manufacturer of soju.

  1. We saw a 35% to 40% increase in the first year since the law passed.” And he thinks that’s only the beginning, once the traditional Korean beverage finds new drinkers.
  2. Soju is enormous outside of the United States: Jinro sold 55 million cases around the world in 2001.
  3. We haven’t aggressively marketed it to the mainstream, but we have a plan to do that in 2003,” Kim says.

The company will start where so many national trends are born: in Southern California. David Reiss, proprietor of Sugar in Santa Monica, believes his was the first non-Asian establishment in Los Angeles to take advantage of the law. He inherited a beer and wine license when he took over the club about four years ago but was unable to upgrade to a full liquor license.

  • He assumed that meant serving only beer, wine, champagne and sake.
  • We got our sake from Mutual Trading, and a guy at the warehouse asked why I didn’t also buy soju, since he knew I had a beer and wine license,” Reiss recalls.
  • Once I found out about soju, it made our business completely different.” Sugar offers a menu of cocktails made with Kyungwoul “Green” soju, produced by Doosan Kyungwoul Co.
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in Seoul, which Reiss describes as “pretty neutral in flavor.” Few order shots of the stuff, but soju mixed in Red Bull is popular, as are standards from lemon drops to cosmos, he says-pretty much everything where you’d use vodka.” He said he’s sure other bars and clubs will catch on fast.

In fact, he’s the one who told Vine’s owner, Simon Jones, about soju. “He said, ‘You’re going to make a lot of money with this!’ ” Jones spent a few days experimenting with the stuff and doing research. “We went to some Korean restaurants,” he says, “and saw that they served it straight up, or shaken with lemon or orange-flavored extract.” Servers at Vine don’t go out of their way to explain soju.

“If people ask for vodka-and-tonic or gin-and-tonic, what we serve. We tell them if they don’t like it, they don’t have to drink it,” Jones explains. Vine’s bartenders mix up a variety of soju-based cocktails, many of which are copies of vodka- and other spirits-based classics, as well as a few originals.

As soju contains only about half the alcohol in vodka, it makes cocktails that feel and taste different. Soju straight up is easy to drink, mild and fairly neutral but a bit watery. Unlike vodka, soju doesn’t turn syrupy when left in the freezer. Few serious drinkers would confuse a shot of the stuff with an equal dose of super-premium vodkas like Pearl.

“It tastes like a ‘well’ vodka,” says Reiss. “Like Smirnoff.” It’s in the custom cocktails at Vine that soju shines. Windex may have a less-than-appealing name, but the electric blue libation, concocted from soju, blue curacao, orange juice and ginger, has a pleasant thickness and sweetness.

  • And the sour apple martini smells like fresh sliced apples and has a pleasant puckery quality.
  • Set decorator Ann Shea was eager to try the new drinks when she noticed Vine’s list.
  • The lemon ginger cocktail tasted really good, like a martini, but not as harsh or strong,” she says.”I don’t usually drink hard liquor,” she adds.

“Too much of a buzz too quickly. But I don’t feel that way with soju. I can have three drinks and feel OK.” With its lower alcohol level, soju may be the drink for people who enjoy sipping a few cocktails over the course of an evening but don’t want to get drunk.

  1. But will this newfound ability to pour soju-based drinks without a full liquor license have adverse consequences? “I’ve done some checking with our offices,” says Gill, “and we have not had any problems with the sale or service of soju in our licensed locations.
  2. Most of our licensees want to do a good job, and if this allows them to provide alcoholic beverages that are less intoxicating, that is not a bad thing.” Sugar, 814 Broadway, Santa Monica, (310) 899-1989.

Vine, 1235 N. Vine St., Hollywood, (323) 960-0800. : Soju Goes Where Vodka Cannot Tread

Is 1 bottle of soju too much?

A standard Korean soju glass size is 50ml, thus one bottle is roughly seven shots. The average number of shots that it takes to get a person tipsy drunk is roughly 7 shots or 1 bottle of soju. However, no one ever really stops at one bottle! Once you get to 2, you’re definitely going to be drunk.

Does soju give you a hangover?

No Tylenol Required David Lansing writes about wine and spirits for The Times. You know what gives you a hangover. But do you know why some spirits are worse than others? Congeners, that’s why. Nasty things that drop in, like uninvited guests, during the distillation process.

  1. There are two truths about congeners: that more of them come along for the ride in darker spirits such as rum or whiskey (on the plus side, these impurities give some spirits their taste and smell), and that some can be filtered out through the distillation process.
  2. Which brings us to Korea’s unofficial national drink, soju.

Like vodka, soju can be distilled from any number of grains and is basically tasteless. It also has about half the alcohol content of most vodkas. Does this mean you can drink a lot and not get a hangover? No. Soju is full of impurities, stuff that can leave you with a thumping headache and a bit of an upset tummy in the morning.

But then there’s Jinro Chamjinisulro Soju. Chamisul, as we like to call it, is filtered four times through a secret ingredient: bamboo charcoal. “In Korea, everyone knows that bamboo charcoal is the best way to purify things,” says Alex Kim of Jinro America. In fact, says Kim, his mom used to throw a chunk of bamboo charcoal in the pot when she made rice.

“I asked her why, and she said it cleans your digestive system.” But does bamboo charcoal prevent hangovers? “Definitely,” he says. Which is good enough for me. Now if only brewers would use bamboo charcoal to filter my favorite beer.

*Chamisul Soju sells for $4 to $15 a bottle at Korean markets, including:California Market

450 S. Western Ave. (213) 382-9444 Hannam Chain Super Market 2740 W. Olympic Blvd. (213) 382-2922 Han Kook Super Market 124 N. Western Ave. (323) 469-8935 Get our L.A. Goes Out newsletter, with the week’s best events, to help you explore and experience our city. You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times. : No Tylenol Required

Is it OK to chug soju?

Etiquette and how to drink soju – Is Soju Alcohol Photo: /Shutterstock There are traditional rituals guiding the consumption of soju, and much of it goes back to the fact that people aren’t meant to drink soju alone. The very nature of soju is communal. “People do drink it alone, but I think that there’s really a sense of sharing with friends and family,” says Kim.

Case in point: You’re not supposed to pour your own drinks. Instead, wait for a friend or seatmate to fill your glass when it’s empty. You return the favor when the time is right (whatever you do, don’t drink straight from the bottle). Both the glass that’s being refilled and the bottle being poured should be held with two hands.

If you’re drinking soju straight, which is the most common approach, it’s served in a shot glass. This is slightly misleading. It might be tempting to shoot soju, but it’s more common practice to gradually sip. Kim compares soju pours to small pours of whiskey one would savor rather drink down in one gulp.

  • There is one exception: The first pour of soju should be taken as a shot.
  • If you want to adhere strictly to tradition (which might be appropriate depending on setting) turn your head away from dining companions when taking the shot as a sign of respect.
  • If you’ve been to a Korean restaurant, you may have noticed people shaking the soju bottle before opening it.

This tradition stems from when soju bottles were corked rather than secured with a metal cap. Bits of the cork would crumble into the drink, so you’d have to shake the bottle to get the sediment to rise to the top. Once the cork popped off, you’d tap the base the bottle with your elbow, followed by a swift hit with the webbing between your middle and pointer fingers to release a small splash of liquid, supposedly to release the unwanted chunks of cork from the bottle.

What does soju taste like?

What Does Soju Taste Like? – “In Korea, we have a saying that soju tastes like life — one day it’s sweet, one day it’s bitter, and sometimes it’s just clean and smooth,” says Yoon. “Traditionally, soju is fermented white rice with a crisp flavor, a little apple, and sometimes a touch of burnt rice.” Soju is often called the Korean vodka, since it’s smooth, mild, and mostly neutral, but it clocks in at about half the alcohol content.

What age can Koreans drink soju?

At what age can you drink soju in Korea? – If you are an adult aged 19 or over, you can order this liquor at most Korean food restaurants. And in Korea, many restaurants sell soju because Koreans enjoy having it with their meals, just like wine.

Can you mix soju with Coke?

3. Cojinganmek (Cola + Soju + Beer) – You might have heard of the somaek ( soju + beer), but this one’s an upgrade to try. Meet your new go-to mixture – cojinganmak ! This concoction contains two different shots – soju and coke – stacked inside a cup of beer.

10% Shot of Coke 10% Shot of Soju 90% Cup of Beer

Why is soju so popular?

What is soju? – Soju is a clear spirit that hails from Korea. It’s usually 20% to 24% alcohol by volume, which is very light when compared to vodka, which is typically 40% ABV. Soju is very neutral in flavor, like vodka, but doesn’t come with the harsh alcoholic burn.

While Soju hails from Korea, it is popular in many Asian countries, such as China and Japan. The flavor profile of Soju can vary greatly, as there aren’t harsh laws that stipulate what ingredients can be used to make it. In general, Soju tastes similar to vodka but a little more viscous and slightly sweeter.

Soju is unique because it’s a distilled spirit, but it doesn’t follow the “rules” of a traditional distilled spirit. It’s very low in alcohol, which means that in some states, like New York and California, it can be served in restaurants without a specialty liquor license,

Is soju easy to drink?

Soju — often called ‘Korean vodka’ — is as smooth and catchy as a BTS dance hit. Around 20-25% ABV (40-50 proof, or about half the alcohol of standard vodkas), this traditionally rice-based liquor is easy to drink and mildly sweet, pairing effortlessly with salty ramen, savory pork and spicy seafood stews.

Why doesn’t soju taste like alcohol?

What is soju? – At its most basic, soju is a clear, 20-24 percent alcohol by volume (ABV) spirit. It’s from Korea, and is mostly consumed in Korea, Japan, and China, with being the most popular brand. Soju is neutral-tasting like vodka, but doesn’t have the harsh alcohol burn thanks to having around half the percentage of alcohol.

  • Soju is traditionally consumed straight with food but also mixes well into cocktails.
  • Another thing to know about soju is that the taste can vary considerably, thanks to lax laws regarding the ingredients used to make it.
  • In general, soju resembles a low-alcohol, tasteless version of vodka, but it’s more viscous and a little sweeter.

Get the latest in beer, wine, and cocktail culture sent straight to your inbox. Soju is traditionally made from rice, but that changed during the Korean War, according to Bran Hill, a distiller at Van Brunt Stillhouse who makes a traditional soju called,

  • Distilling rice was banned, so Koreans started making soju with alternative starches like wheat, sweet potatoes, and tapioca, Hill tells VinePair.
  • The ban was lifted in the late 1990s, but many of the best-selling brands in Korea still use alternative starches.
  • Despite the worldwide sales numbers of soju, the spirit isn’t well known in the United States.

With the rise of Korean food, however, that’s starting to change, says Ryan Te, general manager of New York’s Jungsik and former beverage director at Oiji. “In America, soju has been seen as a distilled spirit that doesn’t follow the rules of a distilled spirit,” Te says.

“It’s almost watered down, and it can be served with the same license as a beer and wine license.” Restaurants that want to serve soju don’t have to apply for (or pay for) expensive liquor licenses in New York and California. If a business has a beer and wine license, then it can sell soju. Restaurants can build low-alcohol cocktail lists by using soju as a vodka replacement, in turn boosting its popularity.

“Soju hasn’t received the respect or elegance as sake,” Te says, “but it’s on the cusp. It’s just a matter of time until it breaks out.”

Does soju make you sleepy?

– Anyone who’s ever indulged in a drink or two knows that alcohol can make you real sleepy, real fast. That’s because alcohol depresses the central nervous system. It has a sedative effect that helps you relax and makes you drowsy, so you fall asleep faster.

How many shots of soju gets you drunk?

How Much Soju To Get Drunk – Conclusion – Is Soju Alcohol Soju is much stronger than beer or wine but not nearly as strong as other hard alcohols. Soju is a clear smooth distilled alcohol that is traditionally consumed straight up. The current generally accepted blood alcohol level to be considered drunk is,08.

The average man (198 pounds) can drink around 8 drinks (1.5 oz each) over a two-hour period before becoming drunk. The average woman (166 pounds) can drink around 6 drinks (1.5 oz each) over a two-hour period before becoming drunk. These levels can go up or down based on some of the factors discussed above.

About The Author : How Much Soju To Get Drunk?

Is soju bad for liver?

A study of the awareness of chronic liver diseases among Korean adults 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.6 Publicity and Casting Committee of 8th Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Seoul, Korea.

  • Find articles by 2 Department of Gastroenterology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.6 Publicity and Casting Committee of 8th Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Seoul, Korea.
  • Find articles by 1 Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.6 Publicity and Casting Committee of 8th Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Seoul, Korea.

Find articles by 3 Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.6 Publicity and Casting Committee of 8th Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Seoul, Korea. Find articles by 4 Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.6 Publicity and Casting Committee of 8th Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Seoul, Korea.

1 Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.2 Department of Gastroenterology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.3 Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.4 Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.5 Department of Internal Medicine, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.6 Publicity and Casting Committee of 8th Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Seoul, Korea. Corresponding author.

Corresponding author: Joo Hyun Sohn. Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, 249-1 Gyomun-dong, Guri, Gyeonggi-do 471-701, Korea. Tel. +82-31-560-2225, Fax. +82-31-555-2998, * Dae Won Jun and Yong Kyun Cho have equally contributed to this work. Received 2010 Jul 5; Revised 2011 Jan 5; Accepted 2011 Mar 7. © 2011 by The Korean Association for the Study of the Liver This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License () which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Chronic liver disease is closely associated with lifestyle, and public enlightenment of the lifestyle factors is important in reducing prevalence of chronic liver disease. The KASL (Korean Association for the Study of the Liver) conducted a survey of basic information and epidemiological data regarding chronic liver diseases. A survey of chronic liver disease involving a total of 2,794 respondents was conducted. The respondents included patients and their guardians, visitors for health check-ups, and online pollees who completed a questionnaire on the awareness of fatty liver or chronic liver disease. Of the entire cohort, 854 (39.7%) said they have had or still have fatty liver or an elevated transaminase level (>40 IU/L), but only 23.4% of the respondents had visited a hospital. It was found that 35% of healthy subjects and 45% of patients and their guardians misunderstood hepatitis B as the hereditary disesase. Furthermore, 26% of the subjects responded that patients with inactive hepatitis B do not require regular follow-up. While 17.9% answered that it is not too late to test for liver cancer when symptoms arise, 38.8% believed that liver transplant in liver cancer patients has a low success rate and is thus not recommended. Despite the inundation of information and widespread media advertising, the awareness of chronic liver disease is unsatisfactory among Korean adults. Systematic nationwide studies are needed to obtain data and information regarding the prevalence of chronic liver disease and patterns of use of the health-care system. Keywords: Awareness, Chronic liver disease, Korea Chronic hepatitis B is a major cause of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer in South Korea and is one of the most important factors of chronic liver disease. Vaccination at the national level starting in the late 1980s has decreased successfully the prevalence of hepatitis B. The prevalence of HBs Ag dropped from 6-8% of the total population in the 1980s to 5.7% of adults and 2-3% of children in the 1990s., According to Korea Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1998, the prevalence of HBs Ag recorded 4.5% in the population aged over 10 years and it declined to 3.7% in 2007. However, despite the decrease of the prevalence of hepatitis B the prevalence of chronic liver disease and social cost of total chronic liver disease have not been reduced. The amount of money claimed from National Health Insurance Cooperation due to alcoholic liver disease (K70), liver cirrhosis (K74) and other liver disease (K76) increased by 9-16% every year from 2007 to 2008 (). A reason for the prevalence and the social cost have not been declined despite the decrease of chronic viral hepatitis B, is considered to be caused by the increase of liver disease related with alcohol, obesity, and herb medicines and supplementary health food. In particular, the increase of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is clearly observed., Chronic liver disease is closely related with lifestyle, and national promoting and education are the most important to decrease its prevalence. But only a few studies on its basic prevalence, awareness of the general population and actions to deal with it have been conducted. The Korean Association for the Study of the Liver (KASL) designated 20 th October as “The Day of Liver” in 2000 to promote and to improve public health through nationwide promoting and education about liver disease and it has tried to collect basic and epidemiological data about chronic liver disease. This study aims to investigate and analyze the awareness and the health care utilization of chronic liver disease in the general population, patients and guardians based on the results of questionnaire surveys in 2008 and 2009, to be used for future activities of KASL. The questionnaire survey on the awareness of fatty liver disease was conducted to analyze the awareness of nonalcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease with totally 2,153 patients and guardians visiting hospitals in September 2008. The questionnaire consisting of 15 questions were largely divided into three categories of the awareness, the prevalence of nonalcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver and its correlation with socioeconomic factors. To determine the prevalence, the questionnaire examined frequencies of abnormality in fatty liver and blood tests in other medical institutions, health care utilization of fatty liver disease patients, the awareness of causal factors of fatty liver disease and the natural process of the disease. The questionnaire was conducted with patients and their guardians visiting 16 hospitals, persons visiting them for health screening, and participants recruited through the Internet. Respondents read the questionnaire and answered. To calculate the amount of alcohol intake, types of alcoholic beverages and a frequency of alcohol-drinking per week were investigated. Alcohol consumption was calculated by the concentration and amount of intake of alcohol beverages and converted into bottle of soju (one bottle of soju is equivalent to 72 g alcohol). The questionnaire containing totally 34 questions examined the awareness of chronic liver disease and the current situation of health care utilization. It consisted of the awareness of chronic hepatitis B, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. For chronic hepatitis B, the awareness of the natural process of chronic hepatitis, inactive carriers, the therapies for hepatitis B and their periods, side effects of antiviral agents and viral resistance, were examined. For liver cirrhosis, its natural process, management and examination cycles and liver transplantation for it were investigated. For liver cancer, the awareness of the importance of early detection of liver cancer, diagnostic procedures, screening tests and treatments were examined. In addition, the questionnaire on the awareness of each disease investigated health care utilization along with the awareness. The questionnaire survey was conducted with 641 persons visiting the Gastroenterology department in six tertiary hospitals in September 2009. The respondents of the questionnaire survey on the awareness of fatty liver were totally 2,153 and they consisted of 1,151 (53.5%) males and 1,002 (46.5%) females. Their mean age was 37.7±12.1 years. The participants consisted of visits to hospitals for health screening, patients and their guardians, and internet questionnaire recorded 27.1%, 63.2% and 7.7%, respectively. For the questionnaire on the awareness of chronic liver disease, the respondents included 327 (51%) females and 314 (49%) males and their mean age was 38.6±11.6 years. Out of them, 34% were patients and their family members, and general persons accounted for 66%. In the survey on the awareness of fatty liver, 24.4% of the respondents said that it was a natural phenomenon with getting older, and 57% answered that it was a morbid condition. Out of the total respondents, 31.9% responded that fatty liver was found only in persons drinking alcohol, and 76.3% said that fatty liver could proceed to liver cirrhosis or liver cancer (). Awareness survey for fatty liver disease Among the subjects of the questionnaire survey to investigate their awareness of obesity 46.3%, 24.2%, and 24.1% had a normal weight and were overweight and obese, respectively. Actually 49.5% of the subjects, who were underweight, said that they maintained an appropriate weight while 38.3% of the overweight ones answered that they had a proper weight. So, the awareness of their own weight was found to be distorted (). Out of the total respondents, 854 (39.7%) responded that they had heard to have fatty liver or abnormal results of liver function tests. However, 23.4% visited hospitals or clinics due to these problems. Among the subjects with abnormal results of liver function test, 68.7% visited doctors. Among the subjects with fatty liver, 47.6% visited medical institutions. The participants of the survey drank averagely 1.07 bottles of soju per week. The male and female subjects drank 1.7 and 0.4 bottles per week based on soju, respectively. Thirty percent of the male subjects drank more than two bottles of soju per week, and 7.9% of the female ones did more than one bottle of soju per week. When it was asked whether the current alcohol intake was appropriate, 983 (45.7%) and 658 (30.6%) said that they consumed alcohol properly and much, respectively. However, 24.4% of the subjects drinking over two bottles of soju answered that they took it appropriately. Among those drinking over two bottles of soju, 46.8% and 44.5% had fatty liver and abnormality in liver function test, respectively. When the respondents were recommended to stop drinking alcohol due to alcoholic fatty liver, 77.4% said that they would quit drinking alcohol. However, only 51.9% of the subjects drinking over two bottles per week had an intention to stop drinking alcohol despite the recommendation of doctors. Out of the respondents, 29.9% and 30.8% had heard to have fatty liver and abnormality in liver function test at hospitals, respectively. Association between socioeconomic factors and fatty liver disease and health care utilization were analyzed. Among the subjects, 61 (2.9%), 102 (5.0%), 542 (25.2%), 1098 (51.0%) and 246 (11.4%) graduated an elementary schoo, graduated a middle school, a high school, a college, and a postgraduate school as a final educational background, respectively, and 105 did not respond the background. When the amount of alcohol intake was compared by educational status, the mean alcohol intake recorded the lowest in the subjects graduating an elementary school, while it showed the highest level in those graduating a high school, and it was followed by those graduating a college. Although lower educational background was associated with higher rate of obesity, the difference was not statistically significant. Lower educational background showed higher rates of associating with liver disease and of visiting hospitals due to liver disease (). Sociological analysis of fatty liver disease As 78.2% of the subjects recognized chronic hepatitis B as a chronic disease and said that it needed a long-term follow-up, 21.8% did not perceive the necessity of long-term examinations. For hepatitis B virus carriers, 26.1% responded that it did not need any additional tests. When the knowledge about antiviral agents currently used to deal with chronic hepatitis B was examined, most of the respondents did not know effects and purposes of the use of the antiviral agents. Only 68-75% answered that the use of antiviral agents could prevent or delay the occurrence of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer, and 25-31% did not aware the purpose of the antiviral agents. In addition, 35.9% of the respondents said that a short-term treatment for one to two years was sufficient (). Thirty two percents in the general population and 45% in patients and their guardians considered hepatitis B as a genetic disease. Awareness survey for chronic hepatitis B Out of the respondents 67% answered that liver cirrhosis was not curable by medical treatment (). As much as 62.8% of the subjects thought that there was no specific therapy for the disease, and 45.8% answered that the success rate of liver transplantation was high. Forty five percents responded that folk remedies were helpful for the treatment of liver cirrhosis. Awareness survey for cirrhosis Among the respondents, 86.3% said that liver cancer detected early could be treated well. However, 46.4% answered that liver cancer could be diagnosed only with blood test, and 17.9% did that it was not late to screen liver cancer when there was a symptom. Moreover, 17.6% of the total respondents did not know that chronic liver disease was a high risk factor of liver cancer. Although 69.3% responded that the association of liver cirrhosis and liver cancer could be treated effectively with liver transplantation, 38.8% said that the transplantation was not recommended because of its low success rate in liver cancer patients. In other words, the awareness of liver transplantation varied (). Awareness survey for liver cancer The prevalence of chronic liver disease is high in Korea, However, studies on its management and awareness are limited. In addition, most of them were performed in the 1990s when health care system was not established well, their subjects were medical staffs and they were conducted in specific regions. In other words, there has been nearly no large scale research performed with actual chronic liver disease patients., In 2000, KASL designated October 20 th as the Day of Liver for a national promoting for prevention and management of liver disease. This nationwide survey was conducted with over 2,000 general persons and patients by ‘KASL’. Moreover, it is meaningful as it includes subjects recruited through various routes such as health screening and the internet as well as patients and their guardians visiting hospitals. In the analysis on the awareness of fatty liver, the rate of perceiving fatty liver as a disease was low although nonalcoholic fatty liver patients increased due to a rapid growth of obese population. According to this survey, 24.4% thought that fatty liver was one of aging effects and only less than half of the subjects, who had heard to have fatty liver or abnormality of liver function, visited medical institutions to cope with it. Considering that other survey performed with hepatitis B patients revealed that the rates of following up them and examining their families recorded only 21.4% and 39.3%, respectively, more active promoting and management programs to improve the public awareness of chronic liver disease are necessary. Moreover, as many underweight or overweight persons thought themselves to have a normal weight because of a distorted perception of a normal weight and obesity, education and promoting of obesity should be conducted appropriately. Socioeconomic factors are generally known to affect the prevalence of chronic adult disease like hypertension and diabetes. This study found that the socioeconomic factors influenced not only the morbidity rate of chronic liver disease but also health care utilization. Although educational background, job and income level of the subjects needed to be evaluated to assess the effect of socioeconomic factors. This study examined only educational background to determine a socioeconomic level. The respondents with lower educational background tended to have higher prevalence of liver disease and higher frequency of visiting medical institutions. This finding shows that socioeconomic factors should be considered to understand health care utilization of chronic liver disease patients and to establish a management system for them. With the development of various antiviral agents, hepatologists recognize chronic hepatitis B as a manageable chronic disease. However, ordinary people seem to misunderstand the use of antiviral agents. Many people are reluctant about the long term use of antiviral agent. That is thought to be caused mainly by worry about the resistance and the side effects of antiviral agents. Moreover, an excessive trust in oriental herbs and folk remedies were found to work as obstacles of treatment and management of hepatitis B in South Korea. For the use of antiviral agents, it is necessary to persuade patients and their guardians to understand sufficiently the possibility of long-term use and the reasons for it. In addition, 32% of the patients and 45% of the guardians wrongly perceived hepatitis B as a genetic disease and many respondents wrongly considered that the disease was infected among family members in daily life due to its strong infectivity in many cases. To manage hepatitis B appropriately, more active and systematic promoting is necessary. The current improvement of liver transplantation techniques and the development of immunosuppressants lead to higher success rate of liver transplantation, so it is recognized as a good treatment for liver cancer as well as advanced liver cirrhosis. However, as show in the results of this study, over 60% of the respondents knew that advanced liver cirrhosis and liver cancer could be treated by liver transplantation and surgical methods but more than half of them thought the transplantation negatively because of its low success rate. Therefore, promoting of positive outcomes of liver transplantation to treat liver cirrhosis and liver cancer are needed. One of limitations of this study is that structural validity and internal validity of the questions in the questionnaire are not proven. Some questions are not clear and too difficult to understand of unfamiliar medical terminology, so some answers were shifted to one side. This survey has concerns about a lack of order of the questions. Certain questions provoke positive or negative effects on a following question, but it were not fully considered. So, more systematic and structured questionnaires need to be invented in the future. In conclusion, despite the development of mass media and the continuous promoting of KASL, there is still wrong awareness of chronic liver disease. Systemic nationwide study is consistently required for investigation of the prevalence of chronic liver diseases and health care utilization of the patients. We sincerely appreciate efforts of the members of KASL joining open health lectures, free health screening and this questionnaire surveys conducted on ‘the Day of Liver’ held by KASL in 2008 and 2009. The study was presented in the ceremony of ‘the Day of Liver’ of KASL in 2008 and 2009.1. Joo KR, Bang SJ, Song BC, Youn KH, Joo YH, Yang S, et al. Hepatitis B viral markers of Korean adults in the late 1990s: Survey data of 70,347 health screenees. Korean J Gastroenterol.1999; 33 :642–652.2. Sim JG, Seo JK, Suh SJ. Prevalence and its changes of hepatitis B viral markers from 1988 to 1993 in Korean children. J Korean Pediatr Soc.1995; 38 :1535–1539.3. Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) The Positive Rates of hepatitis B surface antigen. KNHANES Web site (online),,2005.,4. Seo SH, Lee HW, Park HW, Jang BG, Chung WJ, Park KS, et al. Prevalence and associated factors of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the health screen examinees. Korean J Med.2006; 70 :26–32.5. Lee KE, Kim YM, Kang ES, Kim HJ, Chung HW, Lee SH, et al. Metabolic significance of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in non-obese adults. Korean J Med.2002; 63 :488–495.6. Paik JJ, Lee HJ, Lee YH, Lee K, Park TJ. The concept and managemnt of hepatitis B infection-Difference between general practitioners and hepatologists. J Korean Acad Fam Med.1998; 19 :326–336.7. Han JH, Lee DC, Lee HR, Park HW, Jung GC, Park SG. Knowledge of hepatitis B and follow-up test in HBs Ag positive patients. J Korean Acad Fam Med.1997; 18 :706–713.8. Kim IH, Kim OM, Lee CG. Hepatitis B examination and recognition change after 1 year in girls’ high school students. J Korean Acad Fam Med.2001; 22 :1271–1278.9. Disano J, Goulet J, Muhajarine N, Neudorf C, Harvey J. Social-economic status and rates of hospital admission for chronic disease in urban Canada. Can Nurse.2010; 106 :24–29. Articles from The Korean Journal of Hepatology are provided here courtesy of Korean Association for the Study of the Liver : A study of the awareness of chronic liver diseases among Korean adults

See also:  Does Alcohol Cause High Cholesterol?

How much soju do Koreans drink?

There’s South Korea, and then there’s everywhere else. ​ The biggest hard alcohol drinkers on the globe aren’t cuddled up somewhere in sub-zero Siberia; they’re sipping on Soju, in South Korea. South Koreans drink 13.7 shots of liquor per week on average, which is the most in the world,

  • And of 44 other countries analyzed by Euromonitor, none comes anywhere close.
  • The Russians, the second biggest in Euromonitor’s sample, down 6.3 shots per week; Filipinos drink roughly 5.4 shots per week; and Americans consume only 3.3.
  • South Korea’s unparalleled liquor consumption is almost entirely due to the country’s love for a certain fermented rice spirit called Soju.

The South Korean liquor accounts for 97% of the country’s spirits market, Donning the hard alcohol crown can be problematic at times. South Korea’s alarming alcohol consumption has led to outbreaks of drunken violence and prompted its ministry of health and welfare to launch a marketing campaign in 2011 in hopes of steering its citizens clear of heavy drinking.

Can 2 bottle of soju make you drunk?

Can 2 bottles of soju make you drunk? You’d have to DRINK the soju, but yes. Typical soju bottle is 375ml and 20% ABV. Do the math, and its about the same amount of alcohol as 1/4 of a 750 ml bottle of 40% ABV vodka, or 4 drinks.

Is soju drunk in shots?

Download Article Download Article Soju is a traditional Korean spirit that is best served cold and neat (with no ice). It’s also the best selling alcohol in the world. Packaged in a classic green bottle, it has a neutral flavor that is similar to American vodka. If you are in Korea, or in the company of Koreans, you should follow the traditions of the social sharing ritual when drinking soju.

  1. 1 Serve the soju cold and neat for the best flavor. Chill the bottle of soju in the refrigerator for a few hours if you are drinking at home. Don’t add ice to the drink because it is typically served as a small pour and taken as a shot.
    • You won’t need to worry about this if you are ordering drinks in a restaurant—it will be served ice-cold and ready to drink!
  2. 2 Swirl the bottle around to create a whirlpool inside. Hold the soju near the bottom of the bottle in one hand and vigorously swirl it in a circular motion. It should only take about 2-3 seconds of swirling to create a whirlpool effect inside the bottle.
    • This act is said to date back to the old days when sediment was deposited into the bottles during production. Swirling the bottle is meant to bring the sediment to the top of the bottle.
    • Some drinkers opt to shake the bottle instead of swirling.

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  3. 3 Slap the bottom of the bottle with your palm before twisting off the cap. Holding the bottle towards the bottom of the neck in one hand, use your other hand to firmly slap the end of the bottle. After a couple of firm slaps, twist off the cap.
    • You may also bang the bottom of the bottle against your elbow instead of slapping it with your palm.
    • Some say the purpose of this part also has to do with breaking up the sediment in the bottle.
  4. 4 Spread your middle and index finger apart and jab the neck of the bottle. Grip the lower portion of the bottle with one hand to hold it steady, and use the webbed area between your middle finger and index finger on your other hand to sharply jab the neck of the bottle. This should be done with enough force to make a little bit of the soju splash out of the bottle.
    • This portion of the bottle-opening ritual is meant to knock the sediment that was deposited during production out of the bottle so it doesn’t get drank.
    • Modern production of soju filters the alcohol, so sediment is no longer an issue. However, the tradition has remained.
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  1. 1 Have the oldest person in the group pour the first shot of soju. They will pour a shot into each group member’s glass. After everyone has received their pour, another member of the group will use both hands to pour a shot for the server.
    • This is a symbol of respect.
  2. 2 Use both hands to hold the bottle while pouring shots. As members of the group take turns pouring rounds of shots for one another, each should always hold the bottle with both hands. This is another way of showing respect, especially when serving your elders.
    • If you are pouring the shots, do not fill your own glass. After you have filled everyone else’s glass, set the bottle down so someone can fill yours for you.
  3. 3 Hold the shot glass with both hands while receiving the drink. This is also a symbol of respect. Raise your cup in the air and hold it towards the server to make pouring easier. Some people may choose to bow their head when receiving the pour as well.
    • After the first round of drinks has been poured, older people may use one hand when receiving subsequent pours.
  4. 4 Turn your head to avoid eye contact while you drink the first shot. Be sure to still hold the glass with both hands while you take your drink. The first round of drinks should be taken as a shot, not sipped.
    • Using both hands while drinking is a sign of respect, and turning your head away from others is to avoid flashing your teeth—which can be seen as disrespect in traditional Korean culture.
  5. 5 Offer to fill empty glasses as needed. Per tradition, no glass should sit empty and no one should drink alone. If you notice someone’s glass is empty, ask if they would like another drink. After the first round of drinks, anyone can offer to fill glasses.
    • Remember to use both hands while pouring the drinks.
    • Remember not to fill your own glass. After you have poured a round of shots, set the bottle down so another member of the group can fill yours for you. (Remember to hold your glass with both hands while they pour.)
  6. 6 Sip or shoot the drinks taken after the first round. Traditionally, only the first round of drinks needs to be taken as a shot. After that, you can choose to either shoot or sip your drinks.
    • Many people choose to continue to take shots, just because the “rubbing alcohol” flavor of the soju doesn’t make it very pleasant for sipping.
  7. 7 Drink together to show solidarity. In the Korean tradition, no one should drink alone. If you pour another shot for someone, they should pour one for you as well. If someone offers to pour you a shot first, always accept it.
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  1. 1 Play a simple game of “Flick the Cap” after opening a new bottle. This is one of the most popular drinking games. After you remove the cap from the soju bottle, twist the end piece of the seal that’s connected to the cap to make it more stiff. Each person then takes turns flicking the end piece with their fingers.
    • The person who flicks the end piece off of the cap wins; everyone else drinks.
  2. 2 Play a game of Titanic if you want to pass the time. Fill a drinking glass about halfway full of beer. Carefully set the shot glass in the beer so that it floats. Go around the table taking turns pouring soju into the shot glass. The goal is to keep the shot glass floating.
    • The person who sinks the shot glass is the loser, and must drink the beer/soju mixture (called somek).
  3. 3 Play a game of “Noonchi” if you have a group of at least 4 people. The more players you have, the better! At any point during the visit, shout out “noonchi game 1!” to start the game. Then random members take turns counting in sequential order until you get to the number that corresponds with how many people you have in your group.
    • Here’s the tricky part: No one can shout the same number at the same time. For example, if more than one person shouts “2” at the same time, they all have to drink a shot together.
    • If your group is able to get through all the numbers without saying any in unison, the person who says the final number drinks a shot.
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Add New Question

  • Question What can you mix with soju? This answer was written by one of our trained team of researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow Staff Editor Staff Answer
  • Question Is soju good for your health? This answer was written by one of our trained team of researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow Staff Editor Staff Answer Support wikiHow by unlocking this staff-researched answer. Like many alcoholic beverages, soju may have some health benefits if you drink it in moderation. For example, one study published in the journal Neurology found that 1-2 shots per day were associated with a reduced risk of stroke. However, drinking too much of it can lead to health problems, such as liver disease, high blood pressure, or digestive problems.
  • Question Is soju stronger than vodka? This answer was written by one of our trained team of researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow Staff Editor Staff Answer

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  • Soju is made to be paired with food, so be sure to eat while you drink to avoid becoming overly intoxicated.
  • Use soju with a higher alcohol content in place of vodka or gin in your favorite cocktails. Try it in a Bloody Mary or a Screwdriver.

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Because of the nature of the tradition—the constant pouring of rounds to keep glasses full—it is easy to consume a lot of alcohol and become very intoxicated. Drink responsibly and never drink and drive.

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  • Bottle of soju
  • Beer
  • Shot glass
  • Drinking glass

Article Summary X To drink soju, serve it cold and without ice for the best flavor. When you’re ready to serve it, swirl the bottle around for a couple of seconds, then slap the bottom of the bottle with your palm. This will redistribute the sediment at the bottom of the bottle if there is any.

Once you’ve done this, twist off the cap and choose the oldest person in the room to pour shots, which is tradition in Korean culture. If you’re pouring the shots, fill everyone else’s glass, then set the bottle down so someone else may fill yours, which is considered respectful. Make sure to hold your shot glass with both hands while receiving the drink, which is also a sign of respect.

When everyone has a shot, take them together. To learn how to play Soju drinking games, read on! Did this summary help you? Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 272,509 times.

What category of alcohol is soju?

What Does Soju Taste Like? – “In Korea, we have a saying that soju tastes like life — one day it’s sweet, one day it’s bitter, and sometimes it’s just clean and smooth,” says Yoon. “Traditionally, soju is fermented white rice with a crisp flavor, a little apple, and sometimes a touch of burnt rice.” Soju is often called the Korean vodka, since it’s smooth, mild, and mostly neutral, but it clocks in at about half the alcohol content.

What type of alcohol is soju considered?

This week, the 2018 Winter Olympics will kick off in PyeongChang, South Korea, While the athletes probably won’t be among this group (at least not until they’re finished with competition), a good number of people will celebrate meals by knocking back some soju, Is Soju Alcohol Soju is traditionally consumed as shots. Getty Images How is it made? Traditional soju is made from a blend of rice and grains. From the 1960s to the 1990s, using rice was banned in soju production because it was in such short supply, so sojus were made with other starches like sweet potatoes and wheat.

  • Even though the ban is no longer in place, many soju producers look beyond rice for their starches.
  • How is it consumed? In Korean company, soju is typically drunk out of small glasses and imbibers don’t traditionally serve themselves.
  • It’s very interactive,” says Simon Kim, the owner of Cote, a new and buzzy Korean steakhouse in New York City, which serves four premium sojus and uses the liquor in cocktails.

“I pour you a glass, you pour me a glass, we toast, drink, and then do it all over again.” Since it’s about 20-percent ABV, it sits somewhere between wine and harder booze like gin and whiskey in terms of potency. Is Soju Alcohol Soju is known for its green bottles. Getty Images What does it taste like? “Rubbing alcohol,” says Kim. “Watered-down vodka” is another way he describes the flavor. The taste can vary, but in cocktails you’ll see it used as a vodka substitute. How much does it cost? Next to nothing, which probably explains its popularity. Is Soju Alcohol Courtesy Chum Churum Original Soju (375-ml) Buy Now $8.99 Jinro 24 Soju (1.75 L) Buy Now $16.99 Is Soju Alcohol Simon Kim owns Cote, New York City’s first Korean steakhouse. Gary He Is Soju Alcohol Contributing Digital Editor Sam Dangremond is a Contributing Digital Editor at Town & Country, where he covers men’s style, cocktails, travel, and the social scene.

How much soju is considered one drink?

Soju and blood alcoholic content (BAC) Based on this assumption, two cups of soju equals one standard drink. One bottle contains approximately four standard drinks.

What percent alcohol is 40% soju?

Soju’s ABV is between 20-25 percent, which is half of vodka’s ABV (usually around 40 percent).

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